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SS Future Re-Open Plan: Timing, Testing Needs??!!


TLCOhio
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14 hours ago, Randyk47 said:

All I can say in public is  ugh.   Can’t say I didn’t expect the decision but reality sometimes sucks.   

 

Sadly, YES, Randy above does summarize well the current twists-and-turns, long waiting, uncertainty, etc.  Glad that Randy kept it "clean" in his wise comments.    

 

From the London/UK Daily Mail Telegraph this morning, they had this headline: “Spain wrestles with fresh wave of coronavirus as tourists return” with these highlights: “Holiday resorts across Spain are seeing coronavirus cases rise again following the return of British tourists, with Tui, Europe's largest tour operator, warning that it could cancel holiday packages if the situation worsens.Tui has said that it will not take customers on holiday if it cannot guarantee their safety, or if the Spanish government reimposes a 14-day quarantine for UK arrivals.  The announcement follows a sharp increase in new infections along the Costa del Sol.”

 

It's not just Florida and California battling with flare ups of virus infection.  Also, today, American Airlines and Southwest are announcing that their plans and hopes for resuming flights are slowing.  Consumer confidence is just not there for ramping up their schedules and flight options.  

 

Full story at:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/07/23/travel-latest-spain-wrestles-fresh-wave-coronavirus-tourists/

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Barcelona/Med: June 2011, with stops in Villefranche, ports near Pisa and Rome, Naples, Kotor, Venice and Dubrovnik. Great visuals with key highlights, tips, etc. Live/blog now at 251,803 views.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1426474

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Hi Terry, Georgia's cases have gone way up as well...........and don't forget Texas and Arizona........it is all

over the place!☹️

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On 7/23/2020 at 12:13 PM, Lois R said:

Hi Terry, Georgia's cases have gone way up as well...........and don't forget Texas and Arizona........it is all over the place!☹️

 

Agree with Lois above that "it" is "all over the place!"  In some states, like Ohio, the curve was "flattened", but that did not mean it was eliminated.  It just avoided a fast "peak" and lessened the immediate pressure on hospitals.  Has a flatter curve just delayed and stretched out the dangers?   Clearly too many people are getting it now and sadly many younger folks are doing the "bar scenes", adding to the challenges and risks for us "older folks".  Sorry, meant to say it as "seasoned citizens"!!

 

From the experienced travel writer Gene Sloan, he wrote this article with this headline: “Royal Caribbean just figured out how to improve the worst part of cruising”.  Here are some of the story highlights: “There hasn’t been a lot of upbeat news for cruise fans coming out of the world’s cruise lines in recent months. But on Friday, Royal Caribbean Group finally gave them something they could get excited about: A plan to greatly shorten and simplify the safety drill process.  The parent company of Royal Caribbean, Celebrity Cruises, Silversea and Azamara said it had developed new technology, which it is calling eMuster, that will let passengers complete most of the safety drill that is held at the start of every cruise on a mobile device or interactive cabin TV instead of in a big, crowded, unwieldy muster station.  After reviewing the safety information on a mobile device or cabin TV, passengers then will complete the drill by visiting their assigned assembly station, where a crew member will verify that all steps have been completed and answer questions.”  Gene Sloan was the long-time travel/cruise expert who reported for USA Today.  Good news, but not exactly solving the many "BIGGER PICTURE CHALLENGES" and other key questions.  

 

From CNN cable news yesterday, they had this headline: “Cruise fans explain why they can't wait to cruise again” with these highlights: “Christine Beehler was on a two-week cruise voyage around South America when Covid-19 caught up with her ship.  Denied entry in Brazil, the Coral Princess spent two weeks searching for a port before docking in Florida on April 4.  By the time the vessel arrived in US waters, there were 12 confirmed cases of Covid-19 on board and two passengers had died.  When New Hampshire-based Beehler returned home on April 6, she also tested positive for coronavirus.  Beehler is 72, with a partial right lung. She also suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema, which means she sometimes experiences breathing difficulties.  Fortunately, Beehler says she had a relatively mild case of coronavirus and she's since made a full recovery.  Avid cruiser Beehler was looking forward to five further voyages booked through 2020.  They've all since been canceled, but Beehler's not let getting stranded at sea -- or catching Covid-19 -- put her off cruising.  In fact, she's keen to return to the seas as soon as she can.”

 

Yes, many experienced cruisers are ready sail again . . . soon!  But, I have also heard from other seasoned travelers who say . . . "NO.  Not for me!" That is part of the biggest questions, as to how soon, how many will want to sail until a vaccine, testing, airline flights, port openings, etc., will have happened.  Anyone have a crystal ball with those answers?  What other key issues need to be addressed?  

 

Full stories at:

https://thepointsguy.com/news/royal-caribbean-emuster-safety-drill/

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/cruise-fans-looking-forward-return-cruising/index.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Norway Coast/Fjords/Arctic Circle cruise from Copenhagen, July 2010, to the top of Europe. Wonderful scenic visuals with key tips. Live/blog at 239,955

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1227923

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Terry, I read that CNN article the other day.  Quite interesting really. Everyone has their own views/feelings/

opinions that is for sure.

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9 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

 

From the experienced travel writer Gene Sloan: Royal Caribbean Group finally gave them something they could get excited about: A plan to greatly shorten and simplify the safety drill process.

 

Consider me less than excited. 😉  Yes, the muster drill consumes half an hour of time, but in the grand scheme of things, I don't really care if they cut that in half or two-thirds. I'll get excited when there's a way to safely travel without the significant threat of COVID-19, muster drill or not.

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12 hours ago, cruiseej said:

Consider me less than excited. 😉  Yes, the muster drill consumes half an hour of time, but in the grand scheme of things, I don't really care if they cut that in half or two-thirds. I'll get excited when there's a way to safely travel without the significant threat of COVID-19, muster drill or not.

 

Agree above with our neighbor to the east in Pennsylvania that this new muster drill effort is fairly minor.  Maybe saves a little time?  I had noted previously:   "Good news, but not exactly solving the many "BIGGER PICTURE CHALLENGES" and other key questions."

 

From the AP newswire and this Harrisburg, Pa., newspaper this morning, they had this headline: “It’s a start, although not a crowded one, for one German cruise ship’s push to get back on the water” with these highlights: “A German cruise ship is gingerly testing the water amid the coronavirus pandemic, setting sail for the first time since the industry was shut down months ago and using strict precautions to keep passengers and crew as safe as possible. The TUI cruise ship 'Mein Schiff 2'  set sail for a weekend cruise in the North Sea late Friday night, the dpa news agency reported. Occupancy was limited to 60% so passengers could keep their distance from one another, but even that level was not reached. The ship sailed off with 1,200 passengers on board compared to its normal 2,900 capacity. The ship sailed from the northern port of Hamburg toward Norway, and passengers will spend the weekend at sea with no land stops before returning to Germany on Monday.”

 

Sorry, for my interests, a short sailing to "nowhere" does not quite "Float My Boat" for excitement, fun and satisfaction. Or, "value"!!  But, for some, they will view it as a form of initial "Forward Progress"??!!  Is the cup half full or half empty??

 

Full story at:

https://www.pennlive.com/nation-world/2020/07/its-a-start-although-not-a-crowded-one-for-one-german-cruise-ships-push-to-get-back-on-the-water.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Sydney to NZ/Auckland Adventure, live/blog 2014 sampling/details with many exciting visuals and key highlights.  On page 23, post #571, see a complete index for all of the pictures, postings.  Now at 230,672 views.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1974139

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8 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

Agree above with our neighbor to the east in Pennsylvania that this new muster drill effort is fairly minor.  Maybe saves a little time?  I had noted previously:   "Good news, but not exactly solving the many "BIGGER PICTURE CHALLENGES" and other key questions."


I agree too, but it provides hope that smart people are on the case and might come up with ingenious solutions to the various problems to be solved.  

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18 hours ago, CruiserFromMaine said:

I agree too, but it provides hope that smart people are on the case and might come up with ingenious solutions to the various problems to be solved.  

 

Appreciate this above follow-up from our CC friend in Maine.  Agree that we hope smart people can figure out these challenges.  BUT, as I have posted over time, there are many aspects for any cruise line re-opening, including with getting the airline flights, countries being opened back up, cruise lines have proper safety standards/practices, consumer confidence being restored, etc., etc.  Not quick, simple or easy!!??

 

Below are the Wall Street charts for the three major cruise line corporations.  As of mid-day, not a good morning for these companies.  Their values are down 5-7% at a time when the overall Dow Jones average was down only a slight amount.  What does Wall Street know and believe that is important to us if we have deposits and money tied up with these highly-leveraged, foreign corporations?

 

From the experienced former USA Today travel expert Gene Sloan, there was this headline: “Why Holland America was right to shed 29% of its fleet — and may need to cut more” with these highlights: “The news last week for Holland America fans was grim.  The storied, Seattle-based line said it would significantly shrink in size in the coming months.  The line said four of its 14 ships — 29% of the total — would leave its fleet by the fall. A huge number of cruises would be cancelled. Some itineraries would disappear. My initial thought? It’s a good start. But they may need to do more. Holland America is one of a handful of brands in the cruise world that I see as essentially broken in this new era of coronavirus — at least until there’s a COVID-19 vaccine, a surefire treatment for the illness or a significant drop in case counts around the world. Holland America is a line that is all about exploring the world. Its ships are known for traversing the globe on long, multi-port, multi-country trips that appeal to people who want to wander. At last count, its itineraries included 473 different ports from Europe to Asia to Australia.”

 

Many important aspects to consider based from his reporting and the varied details that he cites.  Personally, we love cruise lines that visit such a great variety of interesting and unique ports.  But, could this also affect Silversea as it tries to get back to sailing and what has made them so super attractive for many customers such as us?

 

Full story at

https://thepointsguy.co.uk/guide/holland-america-capacity-cuts/

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Venice: Loving It & Why??!!  Is one of your future desires or past favorites? See these many visual samples for its great history and architecture.  This posting is now at 88,173 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1278226

 

From the Wall Street Journal charting, here is how the trends look in value for the three major cruise companies as of mid-day Monday, July 27.  It's a downward trend this morning and over the past five business days!!  Why and for what reasons?.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see these visuals larger/better!)

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From the FOX Business cable news channel in the past 24 hours, they had two different articles that might be of interest.   One had  this headline: “Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line have 1 big potential blockade” and this sub-head: "Convincing one important group to set sail will be harder than you think".

 

Here are some of the highlights from a Motley Fool summary by an experienced Bain Capital analyst: “Cruise lines have a lot of things to worry about these days. Revenue-generating voyages for Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Royal Caribbean have been suspended for more than four months, and we're at least another two months away from a potential restart. Cancellations keep piling up as the resumption date gets pushed out, and that's going to be a cash-flow headache for the companies trying to stay afloat through the interruption.  The longer that ships aren't sailing will also make it that much harder for the cruise lines to woo back passengers. Cruising industry headlines have been largely negative since the pandemic started, and it's going to take a lot of marketing muscle to reverse the consumer mindset. There's also a recession that will naturally limit the number of people that have the means to take a chance on a luxury cruise. However, before we get the first batch of paying passengers walking up the gangway, the industry will have to figure out how to staff these voyages. Will Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line be ready with the crews they need when the industry gets the green light?  Crews have been through a lot, and if you think wooing potential first-time passengers will be a hard sell in the new normal, just imagine talking seasoned employees back on a ship. The dangers of working on a ship are certainly heightened in the new normal, and now it seems that even the adventure component may be under fire. An MSC Cruises list of new protocols that has been circulating online this month includes a ban on shore leave except for emergencies during the first phase of resumed voyages. Being able to get off at exotic ports of call after working long hours on a ship with cramped crew quarters is a perk. It won't be easy to attract and retain staffing if they are confined to the ship itself, especially after everything that they've been through this year.”  

 

Agree with above as getting good, experienced crew will be an important factor for us as to when we want to sail again.  We have viewed both the service and person interaction with great staff to be a major plus as a vital part of the overall cruising experience.  Agree or disagree?  As a part of this first posting, there was a video report that featured a cruise industry representative stating that cruising was safer than riding in a Uber, being in a hotel room, etc.  

 

Another FOX Business article had this headline: “When are cruises going to resume? CDC seeks public's feedback” with these highlights: “The CDC has extended its no-sail order for cruise ships to Oct. 1 and is inviting interested people and organizations to submit feedback on how the cruise industry can resume operations.  It's looking for input on how cruise ships can conduct COVID-19 diagnostic testing on board, how to deal with seaport closures, whether cruise ship operators should make shorter trips and other issues.  Meanwhile, tourism-heavy communities including Key West, Florida, and Bar Harbor, Maine, are reconsidering if and how they want cruise ships in their ports. Bar Harbor recently voted to block cruise ships for the rest of 2020.    It's not just cruise operators that are feeling the pinch. The American Association of Port Authorities is asking Congress to provide $1.5 billion for ports because of lost revenue due to coronavirus, warning that up to 130,000 jobs at coastal ports could disappear.”


Full stories at:

https://www.foxbusiness.com/money/1-big-potential-roadblock-for-cruise-lines

https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/when-cruise-again-deck-cdc

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Amazon River-Caribbean 2015 adventure live/blog starting in Barbados. Many visuals from this amazing river and Caribbean Islands (Dutch ABC's, St. Barts, Dominica, Grenada, San Juan, etc.).  Now at 66,887 views:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2157696

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Absolutely agree that a great staff that delivers excellent service along with personal interaction is a major part of the cruise experience.   Bad staff can quickly turn a good product   mediocre.  I have confidence that Silversea will continue to attract and retain good staff but it could be a challenge.   I also hope they’ll be able to bring back most of the veteran staff.   I have this nagging fear that some of the vets will decide this is as good as anytime to retire.   

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From the Wall Street Journal air travel expert/columnist this morning, there was this headline: “What Travel Will Look Like After Coronavirus" with this sub-headline regarding his comprehensive analysis: "Eight airline and hotel industry veterans make their predictions about what will change about safety and pricing and whether business travelers will ever return to the road”.

 

Here are some of his column highlights: “When will we be traveling again in large numbers? And what will travel be like in the future?  The first question depends on a medical solution to the coronavirus pandemic. The second is best answered with experience.  I asked eight travel pioneers for predictions on what the future of travel will be—current and former chairmen and chief executives of travel companies and a former secretary of transportation. All have experience from past crises and recoveries.  Most foresee a lasting decline in business travel, but think leisure travel will bounce back robustly. That means airlines and hotels will have to change their business plans, being unable to rely as much on rich revenue from corporate travelers. Expect higher ticket prices and room rates for vacationers to cover the costs with fewer high-dollar customers to subsidize bargain-seekers.  Robert Crandall, the former chief of American Airlines, thinks video technology has matured enough to affect business travel in the future. 'The airline industry is going to have to examine its business plan,' says Crandall.  'You are never going to see the volume of business travel that you’ve seen in the past.'  He estimates one-third to one-half of business travel will go away. More meetings will take place electronically. Trips once thought necessary will be seen as superfluous.”  

 

Here are more details that this experienced industry reporter shared: "Even a tiny uptick at the beginning of the summer faded once Covid-19 cases started to surge in some states. The industry is mired in what has now become a depression. On Tuesday, the International Air Transport Association updated its projection of when travel will return to pre-Covid-19 levels: 2024, a year later than the airline group’s previous forecast.  A significant travel rebound, in whatever form it takes, requires widespread vaccination and an effective treatment or cure. It will take both to assure the masses that they won’t risk serious or fatal illness by traveling, experienced travel hands say.  Medical solutions alone won’t do it, though. Industry veterans say countries are going to have to standardize entry requirements, lest confusion frustrate travelers and encourage them to stay home.  The lack of government coordination and reliability has left potential travelers with a fear of being quarantined or stranded. One area where travelers are likely to see permanent change is at airports. Facial-recognition systems for everything from checking bags to passport control are likely to become far more widely adopted to reduce person-to-person contact. Security, passport and customs lines themselves may get redesigned.  Ray LaHood, U.S. transportation secretary from 2009 to 2013, says right now he wouldn’t get on a plane. Government needs to reassure a worried traveling public by imposing strict safety rules that would help build confidence."  

 

While much of his column focuses on air travel, this key aspect affects so many cruisers.  How do get to start the cruise and/or return home without air flights schedules returning to a reasonable level of service, timing and safety??  Great point as to if and when other countries (ports) are being opened up for cruise stops.  As happened earlier this year, nobody wants to arrive in a country and then be forced into spending two weeks in isolation and not able to get on your cruise ship as planned and hope.  

 

Also, check out this link for a major video conference staged Tuesday by Carnival cruises to highlight their preparation and awareness of these various issues related to Covid-19.  While I did not view all of their different expert speakers, it did not seem to offer that many specifics and details as to how and when the various Carnival lines would operate.  For more information from their group of experts, go to:  

CovidScienceSummit.com

 

Full full WSJ story at:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/what-travel-will-look-like-after-coronavirus-11596026858?mod=hp_lead_pos10

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

AFRICA?!!?: Fun, interesting visuals, plus travel details from this early 2016 live/blog. At 49,836 views. Featuring Cape Town, South Africa’s coast, Mozambique, Victoria Falls/Zambia and Botswana's famed Okavango Delta.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2310337

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19 minutes ago, Randyk47 said:

Absolutely agree that a great staff that delivers excellent service along with personal interaction is a major part of the cruise experience.    I have confidence that Silversea will continue to attract and retain good staff but it could be a challenge.  I have this nagging fear that some of the vets will decide this is as good as anytime to retire.   

 

Very well summarized above by Randy from Texas.  Agree that Silversea will try to keep their excellent, experienced staff members.  But, however, will these key people say YES for sailing again!!  

 

Or, NO??

 

During our six cruises with Silversea, those opportunities to chat with the staff, learn about them, their countries, etc., was such a wonderful joy and excellent experience.  They appreciated the interest we had.  Below are a couple of visual items of evidence and proof for how the communications and connection was positive in both directions. 

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Kotor/Montenegro:  Exciting visual samples, tips, details, etc., for this scenic, historic location. Over 47,758 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1439193

 

From sailings on the Silver Cloud, first is five of the Butlers pictured as we were sailing up the scenic fjords of Norway in July 2010.  Second was 2015 when sailing on the Silver Cloud while navigating up and down the Amazon River.  Both staff members wanted a copy of my picture and appreciated that I posted it on Cruise Critic to highlight the great SS staff members.  Recognize or remember any of these staff members?:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see these visuals larger/better!)

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From the Miami Herald this afternoon, they had this headline: Norwegian Cruise Line cancels cruises until November, one month past CDC ban” with these story highlights: “Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings is canceling cruises until November.  The Miami-based company announced it is canceling cruises worldwide through Oct. 31, a full month after the ban on cruises put in place by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expires. Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings is the world’s third largest cruise company and owner of three cruise lines: Norwegian Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises. The announcement comes as Florida is experiencing a surge in COVID-19 infections and deaths.  The company and its largest competitors, Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean Group and MSC Cruises, continued to sell cruises for the summer, though it was unclear when the industry would be able to restart operations. About half of customers who have canceled cruises are opting for a 'future cruise credit' over a refund, giving the companies cash while they weather the industry’s longest pause.”

 

Although Norwegian Cruise Line is not RCCL or Silversea, this is not a good sign for cruising resuming soon.  

 

Full story at:

https://www.miamiherald.com/article244569397.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Dubrovnik!  Nice visual samples, tips, details, etc., for this super scenic location. Over 47,412 views.    

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1439227

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Terry, just a vote of thanks from this side of the Atlantic for your diligent reporting on developments in the cruise industry and detailed summaries of those articles. Whole they say no news is good news, at this time all news is relevant and valuable. Thanks again. 

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Terry, Thanks for the helpful and detailed updates from the USA on the current Pandemic problems.The staff photos bring back many memories for us as we have sailed with them all in our lengthy SS cruising experience.Do you have any more to help revive past cruising days during a time when future cruising is in so much  doubt?

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On 7/30/2020 at 3:24 AM, Tothesunset said:

Terry, just a vote of thanks from this side of the Atlantic for your diligent reporting on developments in the cruise industry and detailed summaries of those articles. Whole they say no news is good news, at this time all news is relevant and valuable. Thanks again. 

 

Appreciate so much the very kind comments and follow-ups from Tothesunset, brimary and CruiserFromMaine.  Your encouragement is helpful.  THANKS!!   Glad to be able to share and offer more background/insights.  This thread has had over 20,000 views and it is good that many have offered info from their experiences and perspective.  Don't be shy with any questions, comments, news stories you have seen, etc.    

 

As to Silversea, their website was updated two days ago and they currently have most of their cruises to start back around late October or early November.  But, realistically, we know those dates are probably way too optimistic.  Most expect, like happened with Princess cruises, that maybe, if and if, mid-December might be the earliest when sailing from U.S. ports can resume.  Now, Silversea shows their first scheduled cruising to be with the new Silver Origin sailing in the Galapagos Island to start on  September 19, 2020.  Will that shiny new ship start sailing there in mid September??  Strongly doubt it!!  Why??

 

Originally, we were scheduled to sail on the Silver Origin in late January 2021.  But in mid March, we scrubbed this planned Galapagos sailing due to the serious financial and health challenges and uncertainties. Too much money was tied up and at risk.  Could not afford that type of gamble!!  This week I found out that while the Galapagos have been opened up, but that the big hold up is getting flights through the Columbia-based Avianca Airlines from Quito, etc., in  Ecuador, to the Galapagos Islands and back.  Avianca has been trying to operate under challenging bankruptcy conditions and does not want to fly its planes half-full or less.  That's part of the "chicken-and-egg" challenge??!!  Many passengers now do not want to fly on planes too full and excessively crowded, but Avianca and others cannot dig out of its "financial hole" without a healthy level of customer use.  Then for customers such as us who are older and more at risk, the limited and maybe crowds flights from Miami to Quito also concern us, too!!  Many questions and much uncertainty.  We want to see and enjoy the scenic and historic Galapagos Islands.  BUT, only when things are more certain and safe.  

 

Overall, going back to my original post with the excellent details from Silversea's head of operations in the Americas, we are still a long, long way from the needed "tools" for testing, airline flights, port/countires being open, etc.  Am watching now on TV the three top national medical experts testifying before a key Congressional committee as to the various steps being taken and required for the future.  Things are progressing in some areas, but "it" will not be known and solved with certainty by October or November.  December?  January?  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Athens & Greece: Many visuals, details from two visits in a city with great history, culture and architecture.  Now at 35,961 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1101008

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On 7/30/2020 at 6:42 AM, brimary said:

The staff photos bring back many memories for us as we have sailed with them all in our lengthy SS cruising experience.  Do you have any more to help revive past cruising days during a time when future cruising is in so much  doubt?

 

Per the excellent request above from brimary, below is just a small sampling of five visuals from our Amazon River sailing in 2015 to reflect the fun and enjoyment while on the Silver Cloud.  Many more of the crew, food, music, speakers, etc., can be seen via the link below.  That was super enjoyable Silversea experience.  WHY??  On a ship that held 296 passengers and had a crew of 212, there were only 179 of us passengers during this 17-day sailing.  That longer sailing with such a "comfortable" level of people on board made things super great.  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Amazon River-Caribbean 2015 adventure live/blog starting in Barbados. Many visuals from this amazing river and Caribbean Islands (Dutch ABC's, St. Barts, Dominica, Grenada, San Juan, etc.).  Now at 67,233 views:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2157696

 

Below is a sampling from our 2015 Silver Cloud sailing up and back along the amazing Amazon River for the Silversea entertainers, my wife having breakfast and chatting with our DR server, a cooking demonstration by the chefs, a crew recognition program with Cruise Director Allan King, etc.  Look like fun?  Yes, it was!!  Bring back memories??:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see these visuals larger/better!)

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From Barron's, the business publication connected with the Wall Street Journal, had this morning a headline of: “Cruise Lines Test the Waters, Launching Sailings in Europe and Asia With Limited Capacities” with these highlights: “The cruise industry is starting to stir after being shut down by the pandemic since mid-March—albeit slowly and in Europe and Asia.  U.S. ports remain closed under a no-sail order imposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through Sept. 30. And some cruise brands, like Carnival’s Princess Cruises line, have suspended their sailings beyond that date.  But Carnival, the world’s largest cruise operator, hopes to resume cruises out of Germany starting Aug. 5.  Several other cruise companies have already relaunched. They include TUI Cruises, a German company in which Royal Caribbean Cruises holds a stake; Hurtigruten, a private company based in Norway; and Hong Kong-based Genting Cruise Lines.  Hurtigruten, which operates a fleet of 16 smaller cruise ships, resumed sailings in mid-June off the coast of Norway.  Its voyages have been operating with a maximum of 50% passenger capacity. That’s up to 75 passengers for its smallest ship and 250 for its largest ship.”

 

Full story at:

https://www.barrons.com/articles/cruise-lines-test-the-waters-launching-sailings-in-europe-and-asia-with-limited-capacities-51596189601?adobe_mc=MCMID%3D14788742572603009082803826451550298116|MCORGID%3DCB68E4BA55144CAA0A4C98A5%40AdobeOrg|TS%3D1596208395

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Lisbon, NWSpain, Bordeaux/Brittany: Live/blog, June 2017 from Portugal to France along scenic Atlantic Coast on the Silver Spirit.  Now at 30,929 views.  Many interesting pictures, details for history, food, culture, etc.:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2511358

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Sadly, the covid 19 illness has already shown up on a Hurtigruten ship in Tromsø, Norway. Four crew members are in hospital.    Here is the Reuters article:

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-norway-cruiseship/four-crew-members-on-norway-cruise-ship-hospitalised-with-covid-19-idUSKCN24W2BG

 

Let us all think of the crew, the disembarked passengers, the hospital workers and all their friends and family. 
 

This single event,  in a line with apparently exemplary infection control precautions, Is very worrisome.   The epidemiological facts around who got infected, when, how, where will be vital to understand.  

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14 minutes ago, christraveller said:

Sadly, the covid 19 illness has already shown up on a Hurtigruten ship in Tromsø, Norway. Four crew members are in hospital.    Here is the Reuters article:

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-norway-cruiseship/four-crew-members-on-norway-cruise-ship-hospitalised-with-covid-19-idUSKCN24W2BG

 

Let us all think of the crew, the disembarked passengers, the hospital workers and all their friends and family. 
 

This single event,  in a line with apparently exemplary infection control precautions, Is very worrisome.   The epidemiological facts around who got infected, when, how, where will be vital to understand.  

Thanks Chris. This story has a long way to run. The crew members were apparently quarantined on ship when they became ill but did not have covid symptoms. What did the ship suspect the crew members had? In the present climate, even if covid wasn't suspected, why were the passengers allowed to disperse before test results were available? The potential for an event like this to disrupt any widescale return to cruising can't be under-estimated.

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While I appreciate the business clippings that Terry in Ohio posts, I'm going to throw out some of my thoughts on what might actually have to have happen in order for a lot of things to return.

 

Vaccine.  The If is as big as the When.  It could be a RNA type, it could be an Adenovirus type, could be both.  Even with a vaccine, estimates (Americans)  are that 50% say they will not get it.   If countries around the world want and need tourists to come back, they might well indeed make a Yellow Fever Card type requirement for the vaccine for people to be allowed off a ship and to enter their country. To know that it is not being brought in!  And maybe a requirement for cruise ship workers to be immunized as well.  I'm not debating the policy ( ethical or not), but its a possibility. And a requirement for trip insurance.

 

Testing.  There is real possibility that what is needed is a at-home, 15 minute, rapid daily strip type test.  If you are truly interested, watch the vide, posted below,  from a a group of Dr's from UCSF that have a weekly "Rounds" video meeting where they discuss all sorts of incredibly important and interesting subjects.  One of this week's is testing. That catching the Positives, 1, 2, 3 days BEFORE any symptoms. Test before you leave home, test when you arrive, 24 hour required hotel stay, test again.  You get the picture. That seems to be the key.  This type of testing is being developed as we speak. For getting people back to work, school, traveling, think of the possibilities.  You test, get a positive, isolate, and after 14 days, you're good to go. Testing a 2nd grader before they eat breakfast, and you will know right before they leave for school if they are positive or not. 

 

Therapies.  The therapies are getting better, but nothing a sure bet, and still only marginal results. 

 

Can you re-start cruising with only one of these things? Maybe?  The 1st step to me would be focusing time, energy and money on that at home rapid daily test.  But we are currently lacking any sort of focus, sadly.

 

Here is the video.  I urge people to put it on the tv or computer, and fold laundry, or make dinner and watch.  There is also one from last week with different Dr's and scientists. It's well worth it.

 

https://youtu.be/VmorptF8db8 

 

 

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Agree wholeheartedly. Proof of immunity or vaccine will be required at some point by insurers and possibly cruise ports as well. Frequent rapid testing can be a good substitute but there will be cruise customers who are turned away at the door when they get their surprise positive result. Which may be a false positive! 
At this point, it is clear the virus hasn’t been eliminated anywhere, really, and we will have to find ways to adapt. As people have always done! 
I was scheduled to cruise Australia in January 2021. I just had a look at the Australian numbers. Scary. I don’t think there will be travel there for quite a long while.

Thanks for the link!

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36 minutes ago, kimanjo said:

Therapies.  The therapies are getting better, but nothing a sure bet, and still only marginal results.

 

This kind of thinking baffles me.

 

Over 98% of people recover, yet there are only "marginal results"??

 

If therapies had a recovery rate for Ebola or cancer of 98%, no one would be calling them "marginal".

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