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SS Future Re-Open Plan: Timing, Testing Needs??!!


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Yes, much is happening these days medically with the approvals and positive movements as to vaccines in the UK, US, etc.  BUT, as we learn more, there are always added questions.   For me, one of the biggest unknowns relates to how long these vaccines will be effective.  Plus, as shown below, testing before a sailing is good, but it is not always 100% accurate due to the time it takes for Covid to show up in each person's body systems.  Still much to know??!!

 

From the Wall Street Journal yesterday, they had this headline: “Coronavirus Sneaked Past Safeguards to Halt Singapore ‘Cruise to Nowhere’” with these story highlights: “Since coronavirus outbreaks on cruise ships shook the industry earlier this year, operators have tried to win back passenger confidence with options such as 'cruises to nowhere' that circle the seas without making port calls. They have upgraded air filters, lowered capacity, required preboarding Covid-19 tests and enforced physical distancing.  But the virus still found its way on board.  A cruise ship operated by Royal Caribbean International returned to port in Singapore on Wednesday after an 83-year-old passenger tested positive. All of the passenger’s close contacts were isolated and have since tested negative, according to the Singapore Tourism Board. The remaining guests have been instructed to stay in their rooms until they get the all-clear, and meals are being sent directly to the rooms. Royal Caribbean was one of two operators recently allowed to resume sailing from Singapore under safety protocols developed in collaboration with the city-state’s tourism authorities  All passengers will be allowed to disembark after a review of contact tracing is complete and will be tested before leaving the terminal.   Questions remain over how the virus made it onto the ship.  All passengers and crew were required to test negative before boarding, and it isn’t known when or where the virus was contracted. Singapore allowed a cautious restart to the cruise industry in part because it has kept infections low in recent months.”

 

Full story at:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/coronavirus-sneaked-past-safeguards-to-halt-singapore-cruise-to-nowhere-11607504643

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Venice: Loving It & Why??!!  Is one of your future desires or past favorites? See these many visual samples for its great history and architecture.  This posting is now at 89,162 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1278226

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From CBS-TV news and other media sources this morning, they had this new headline: “After 'cruise to nowhere' cut short, Singapore says passenger doesn't have COVID-19” with these highlights: “A Royal Caribbean 'cruise to nowhere' was cut short and the ship returned to Singapore on Wednesday after an elderly passenger was diagnosed with the coronavirus, but the Health Ministry later said new tests on the man were negative.  The 83-year-old passenger on the Quantum of the Seas tested positive for COVID-19 after reporting to the ship’s medical center with diarrhea and was immediately isolated, Royal Caribbean and Singapore's Tourism Board said.”

 

Good news?  Which testing do you believe and trust most?  Is all of this "clear as mud"?

 

Full story at:

https://www.cbs8.com/article/news/nation-world/after-royal-carribean-cruise-to-nowhere-cut-short-singapore-says-passenger-doesnt-have-covid-19/507-7ff63851-5fcb-44ac-ac3c-405ddb65979c

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Amazon River-Caribbean 2015 adventure live/blog starting in Barbados. Many visuals from this amazing river and Caribbean Islands (Dutch ABC's, St. Barts, Dominica, Grenada, San Juan, etc.).  Now at 67,679 views:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2157696

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On 12/7/2020 at 2:12 PM, TLCOhio said:

 

My guess is that if you are an average traveler who made a large deposit or advanced payment with a cruise line, you are going to be at . . . "THE END OF A LONG, LONG LINE".  We would be the very small fish in a giant sea of sharks!!   Right or wrong?  What else are we missing?

 

My Very limited Experience in situations like this is that the little guy, never gets anything.  In a 2007 Bankruptcy of a major investment house, the word was that their Corporate bonds were worth $0.50 on face value.  What we ended up with, to date 13 years later, is ZERO.  Between the major creditors and the lawyers, "Small fish in a giant sea of sharks", is an excellent analogy!

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1 hour ago, crusinbanjo said:

My Very limited Experience in situations like this is that the little guy, never gets anything.  In a 2007 Bankruptcy of a major investment house, the word was that their Corporate bonds were worth $0.50 on face value.  What we ended up with, to date 13 years later, is ZERO.  Between the major creditors and the lawyers, "Small fish in a giant sea of sharks", is an excellent analogy!


As I recall when Renaissance Cruise Line shut down the passengers got nothing.    In fact, the line shut down with ships in the middle of ongoing cruises.  The ships that weren’t docked immediately went to the closest port and the crew and staff literally walked away from them.  The onboard passengers were stuck getting home however they could on they own expense.   

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Appreciate these above great comments and follow-ups.  Much positive happening during recent days with the vaccine approvals in the UK, Canada and US.  But, these vaccines take time and serious efforts to manufacture, distribute, administer and allow the time required to become 90%+ effective.  ALL of this will not happen in just a few weeks. 

 

From the below-connected financial website yesterday afternoon, they had this headline: “Norwegian Cruise Lines Mulls Requiring Passengers Be Vaccinated for COVID Before Boarding Ships” with these column highlights: “Norwegian Cruise Lines is looking at whether it can require passengers to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before allowing them on a cruise ship.  CEO Frank Del Rio told Travel Leaders Group that his company would definitely require ship crews to get the vaccine before returning to work, and said its lawyers were looking into whether it was possible to require a so-called 'immunity passport' from customers, too. The policy is being discussed in many industries as the arrival of multiple effective coronavirus vaccines looks imminent.  Next week, a panel will be convened to weigh a request for Moderna's vaccine candidate.  While there are many reasons why an individual might not want to get the vaccine, prohibiting someone from earning a living or taking a vacation because of that choice is a controversial position to stake out.  Travel Weekly quotes Del Rio as saying, 'We have to build confidence in our customers and among ourselves that it's safe to cruise,' but also acknowledges it might not be legal to do so.”

 

REACTIONS??:  Should cruise lines and/or airlines be able to require passengers to have the vaccine and/or some type of "immunity passport"?  Good or bad idea?  Legal or illegal?  And WHY??

 

Full story at:

https://www.fool.com/investing/2020/12/11/norwegian-cruise-lines-mulls-requiring-passengers/

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

AFRICA?!!?: Fun, interesting visuals, plus travel details from this early 2016 live/blog. At 50,482 views. Featuring Cape Town, South Africa’s coast, Mozambique, Victoria Falls/Zambia and Botswana's famed Okavango Delta.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2310337

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From Health Magazine through MSN News yesterday, they had this headline: “What Is a COVID-19 Immunity Passport—and Who Will Get One? Here's What Experts Say” with these highlights: “Now that a COVID-19 vaccine looks set to start rolling out across the US within weeks, discussion has turned to whether some type of vaccination or immunity "passport" might be required.  An immunity passport could prove a person has been vaccinated, and they might be given more freedom about gathering in public places and traveling. The idea is that once the vaccine is widely available, the passport would be issued to people who have been vaccinated to let them move more freely, is all still speculation. However, the International Air Transport Association (IATA), an airline trade association that represents 290 airlines worldwide, said on November 23 that it was in the final stages of developing a digital vaccine passport for travelers. The IATA Travel Pass will let travelers share their vaccination status and COVID-19 test results with airlines and border authorities, via a contactless passport app.  In Australia, Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce told Network Nine television last month, 'We are looking at changing our terms and conditions to say for international travelers, that we will ask people to have the vaccination before they get on the aircraft.' Some countries already require immunization certificates for diseases like polio and yellow fever to prevent global spread. And decades ago, international travelers carried 'International Certificates of Vaccination' approved by the World Health Organization and sponsored by the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare Public Health Services. 'It worked well—travelers carried the record with them and used it to enter countries that required proof of immunizations,' former hospital CEO, health care advisor, and biomedical ethicist Michael Hunn tells Health.

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/what-is-a-covid-19-immunity-passport-e2-80-94and-who-will-get-one-heres-what-experts-say/ar-BB1bPebR

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Kotor/Montenegro:  Exciting visual samples, tips, details, etc., for this scenic, historic location. Over 47,990 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1439193

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46 minutes ago, TLCOhio said:

From Health Magazine through MSN News yesterday, they had this headline: “What Is a COVID-19 Immunity Passport—and Who Will Get One? Here's What Experts Say” with these highlights: “Now that a COVID-19 vaccine looks set to start rolling out across the US within weeks, discussion has turned to whether some type of vaccination or immunity "passport" might be required.  An immunity passport could prove a person has been vaccinated, and they might be given more freedom about gathering in public places and traveling. The idea is that once the vaccine is widely available, the passport would be issued to people who have been vaccinated to let them move more freely, is all still speculation. However, the International Air Transport Association (IATA), an airline trade association that represents 290 airlines worldwide, said on November 23 that it was in the final stages of developing a digital vaccine passport for travelers. The IATA Travel Pass will let travelers share their vaccination status and COVID-19 test results with airlines and border authorities, via a contactless passport app.  In Australia, Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce told Network Nine television last month, 'We are looking at changing our terms and conditions to say for international travelers, that we will ask people to have the vaccination before they get on the aircraft.' Some countries already require immunization certificates for diseases like polio and yellow fever to prevent global spread. And decades ago, international travelers carried 'International Certificates of Vaccination' approved by the World Health Organization and sponsored by the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare Public Health Services. 'It worked well—travelers carried the record with them and used it to enter countries that required proof of immunizations,' former hospital CEO, health care advisor, and biomedical ethicist Michael Hunn tells Health.

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/what-is-a-covid-19-immunity-passport-e2-80-94and-who-will-get-one-heres-what-experts-say/ar-BB1bPebR

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Kotor/Montenegro:  Exciting visual samples, tips, details, etc., for this scenic, historic location. Over 47,990 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1439193


I still have my International Certificates of Vaccination from when I was a kid.  My father was in the US Air Force and we moved a lot including two overseas assignments in England and Morocco.   Even school districts in the US often asked for my record of vaccinations before they would enroll me.   No little yellow card no travel was pretty much the rule in the 50’s and 60’s.   I took an assignment in Germany in the 80’s and it wasn’t an issue by then.  I fully expect it will be back in some form now.    

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I absolutely agree. We have little yellow booklets which note all our vaccinations from the past 20 years from when we went to Ecuador, Tanzania etc. No problem here with adding COVID vaccine to it. I can't see any issue with it - and those anti-vaccers don't tend to travel do they? Certainly here the pro-Brexit people in England won't be the ones standing for hours at passport controls world-wide as we will now be, sob.

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3 hours ago, Randyk47 said:

No little yellow card no travel was pretty much the rule in the 50’s and 60’s.   I took an assignment in Germany in the 80’s and it wasn’t an issue by then.  I fully expect it will be back in some form now.    

 

Make that three of us who have had that yellow card.  We first used it in connection with our 2015 Amazon River cruise on the Silver Cloud where we needed to have the yellow fever shot etc.  Appreciate these good follow-ups.    Agree that this yellow card will be growing in importance and significance.  

 

From a cruise trade publication today, they had this headline: “What We Know About Royal Caribbean’s Free Test Cruises” with these highlights: “Significant demand was born as a result of Royal Caribbean International’s announcement for the search of volunteers to go on its first test sailings prior to returning to sea in the U.S.  So much that a form has been created to sign up, which saw more than 150,000 hopeful cruise lovers leave their details.  'It's a good feeling knowing that so many people want to get back on ships,' said Vicki Freed, senior vice president for sales, trade support and service at Royal Caribbean International, on Dec. 8 in response to the demand.   The test sailings are part of the new Conditional Framework by the CDC, which came in place of the 'No Sail' order. They will include the company having a number of trial cruises using employees and volunteers as stand-in passengers to test safety and health protocols. When will they take place?  Likely the first quarter of 2021, possibly even January. Here’s a quote from Freed:  'We don't know exactly when the test sailings are going to happen – we think in Q1, and we're hoping for January.'  Industry sources previously stated that they expect the Mariner and Navigator of the Seas, the company's recently-refurbished 'short Caribbean ships, to be the vessels pressed into service.Freed said in November that the first cruises will be short sailings to CocoCay, which would allow the company to operate in a bubble on its own private island.”

 

Free sounds good, but would this type of "cruise to nowhere" and being so short actually interest that many Silversea customers?  Reactions, comments and other questions?

 

Full story at:

https://www.cruiseindustrynews.com/cruise-news/24037-what-we-know-about-royal-caribbean-s-free-test-cruises.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Dubrovnik!  Nice visual samples, tips, details, etc., for this super scenic location. Over 47,639 views.    

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1 hour ago, worldtraveller99 said:

I absolutely agree. We have little yellow booklets which note all our vaccinations from the past 20 years from when we went to Ecuador, Tanzania etc. No problem here with adding COVID vaccine to it. I can't see any issue with it - and those anti-vaccers don't tend to travel do they? Certainly here the pro-Brexit people in England won't be the ones standing for hours at passport controls world-wide as we will now be, sob.


We too will have no problem adding a Covid vaccine to the yellow booklet or an endorsement to our passport or whatever.   I do wonder about those who cannot for medical reasons take the vaccine since my wife may be in that group.   Hopefully the World Health Organization will come with a hopefully universal solution for those folks.  
 

As an aside I am sorry to see some of the news coming out of England and the EU about Brexit.   I have read some of the articles about travel and the hurdles.  Distressing to say the least.  Then I read an article about patrol boats hunting down now what will be illegal French fishing boats.  Have we gone mad?    I’m sure there are many, many more equally distressing aspects and impacts.    

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19 minutes ago, TLCOhio said:

 

 

Free sounds good, but would this type of "cruise to nowhere" and being so short actually interest that many Silversea customers?  Reactions, comments and other questions?

 


We are absolutely, empathetically not interested in any “cruise to nowhere” on any cruise line.    We have to fly, sometimes great distances, to catch a cruise and are not willing to do that just to do an island, country, or continent “cruise by”.     

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3 hours ago, Randyk47 said:


We are absolutely, empathetically not interested in any “cruise to nowhere” on any cruise line.    We have to fly, sometimes great distances, to catch a cruise and are not willing to do that just to do an island, country, or continent “cruise by”.     

 

And you're not the type of people the cruise lines will look for for these test cruises. 😉 They are test cruises, to prove they can embark, sail, and disembark passengers without transmission of the virus. A cruise line like SS might not even go through this exercise, unless it's deemed something needed to sail in other countries.

 

And I feel pretty sure that if SS offered a short cruise to nowhere from Florida, they'd be able to find a few hundred interested passengers who would be happy to go anywhere (including an all sea days trip to nowhere) on an all-inclusive luxury ship for free.

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On 12/12/2020 at 5:52 PM, Randyk47 said:

We are absolutely, empathetically not interested in any “cruise to nowhere” on any cruise line.    We have to fly, sometimes great distances, to catch a cruise and are not willing to do that just to do an island, country, or continent “cruise by”.     

 

Appreciate these very good comments and follow-ups from Randy and our neighbor in Philadelphia.  Great point about needing to deal with airports and airlines if flying to a "free" cruise.  Not worth it for us!!  

 

From the Wall Street Journal this morning, they had this headline: Cruises and Covid-19: When U.S. Sailings Could Restart and What Safety Precautions Are Expected"  with this sub-headline: "Carnival, other operators are looking to resume trips next year, but health officials say cruises are high risk and require changes first”.

 

Her are some of the key story highlights: “The coronavirus pandemic has halted cruises in much of the world and idled the fleets of Carnival Corp. , Royal Caribbean Group and Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings.  The operators are promising to resume sailing in the U.S. in 2021, but health officials want them to clear certain requirements first. Here is what you need to know:  When will cruise ships sail again in the U.S.?  Major cruise lines keep pushing back their restart dates as coronavirus cases continue rising in the U.S.  Royal Caribbean: It has suspended U.S. and most global sailings through Feb. 28. Certain sailings have been pushed further into 2021. The timing for U.S. voyages ultimately depends on receiving a permit from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is requiring operators to conduct mock sailings and apply for a certificate at least 60 days before offering passenger cruises.  Is it safe to go on a cruise?  The CDC discourages cruise travel, including river cruises, around the world. In November, the agency raised its assessment of the risk of cruise travel to 'very high' as the U.S. and other parts of the world saw a resurgence in Covid-19 cases.  The risk of contracting the coronavirus on cruise ships remains higher than on other settings—such as airplanes—because of the longer duration, cohabitation and demographics, Martin Cetron, director of the CDC’s division of global migration and quarantine, said in October. Passengers on cruise ships tend to skew older, Mr. Cetron said.”

 

Here is more from their reporting: "Some overseas cruises have tested the waters since the summer, only to be disrupted by coronavirus concerns, even with precautionary measures such as pre-board testing of passengers and crew.   The CDC said initial itineraries can’t be longer than seven days.  Reduced Capacity: Executives have said early sailings will be at reduced capacity. The Singapore trip in December operated at less than half capacity. Expect socially distanced seating on pool decks and in restaurants.  Limited Itineraries: Cross-border regulations remain a challenge for cruise operators, whose ships were left stranded at sea throughout the pandemic because ports wouldn’t let passengers and crew disembark. Companies will make the most out of their private islands in the Caribbean, destinations that offer controlled settings.  No Buffets: The CDC requires ships to modify meal service and entertainment venues to facilitate physical distancing. That could mean no buffets in dining rooms for the first ships to restart operations.  Testing: Covid-19 testing, like in other travel settings, will also be a fixture. All passengers and crew members must be laboratory tested for the disease when arriving at and leaving the ship, the CDC said. Masks: The trade group for cruise lines has proposed to require the wearing of masks on board as well as when physical distancing can’t be maintained during outside excursions.  One of the CDC’s goals in setting the path for a restart to cruises is to avoid overburdening local authorities in dealing with the Covid-19 risk on ships. Ahead of sailings, cruise operators must strike agreements with health-care entities to prepare for evacuation to onshore hospitals, shoreside facilities for isolation and quarantine, and ports to decide the number of ships allowed at a single port."

 

Among the comments by WSJ readers to this story were:  "Until masks and social distancing policies are no longer required, cruising is out for me; Same with Vegas"  "Vaccination certificate mandatory from now on."  "What we learned with ample news reporting earlier this year is that lines were lackadaisical and mostly unthinking and uncaring about their crews.   They cheaped out on everything, including medical treatment.   They stranded crew.  They made refunds very hard.  Most likely, they will not have changed."  "we have two cruises booked.  Can't wait to get on board as soon as CDC says so."   "It's probably safe to say that CDC believes cruising is a non-essential activity.  It's apparent that CDC (and many Americans) believe that avoiding the virus is the pre-eminent objective.  Too many value safety over all else."  "We will not cruise again as long as CDC mandates the masking and social distancing protocols.   All the emphasis is on 'safety' and none on 'enjoyment'.  We will not spend thousands to wear our masks while cowering in our cabin."   "I have no intention on getting on a cruise ship whether it is one of the ocean ships or a river ship until this whole world has tackled this virus.   The US could rid the country of the virus, but what about other countries?  Getting on a cruise ship is akin to spending a layover in a crowded airport.  Very dangerous."

 

Interesting range of comments and concerns as the cruise lines, maybe, in a few months, if and if, seek to resume sailings.  Your comments and reactions??

 

Full story at:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/cruises-and-covid-19-when-u-s-sailings-could-restart-and-what-safety-precautions-are-expected-11607941801

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Athens & Greece: Many visuals, details from two visits in a city with great history, culture and architecture.  Now at 36,970 views.

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Hey Terry, Columbus has been in the news all morning.......CNN has a reporter there following

one of the vaccine deliveries going to one of your major hospitals. Oh,

they are at Ohio State!

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24 minutes ago, Lois R said:

Hey Terry, Columbus has been in the news all morning.......CNN has a reporter there following one of the vaccine deliveries going to one of your major hospitals. Oh, they are at Ohio State!

 

Great follow-up sharing from Lois.  Was watching NBC Today and another cable news network this morning, so I did not see this CNN story.  That Ohio State hospital is only about a mile and a half from our home and is where our son was born in 1977.  Glad that the vaccines are ramping up.  BUT, it will be a number of months before we are high enough up on the priority list to qualify for the shots.  

 

From Bloomberg News through an Arkansas newspaper yesterday, they had this headline: “Case of covid scuttles bid to revive cruise ship travel, enliven tourism” with these highlights: “The optimism on display just two months ago when Singapore Transport Minister Ong Ye Kung pledged to reopen the city-state and its tourism-reliant economy.  Last week the 1,680 passengers on Quantum of the Seas -- enjoying day three of a four-day cruise to nowhere -- and 1,148 crew were alerted to an announcement that a suspected case of covid-19 had been discovered.  The 83-year-old male who tested positive was found to be negative in subsequent tests.  By midweek, all passengers had disembarked. They were tested before being allowed to leave the terminal.
'Even in the early days of the pandemic, cruise ships posed a high risk of outbreaks, and these in turn can spill over into communities,' said Raina MacIntyre, a professor of global biosecurity at the University of New South Wales in Australia. 'The pandemic today is far, far worse than it was in May, when cruising stopped. This means the risk of an infected passenger boarding or an infected staff member being on board is higher now.'  Singapore's ill-fated attempts to enliven tourism underscore the difficulties of getting any sort of travel up and running even in a nation where community cases have been close to zero for several weeks. The cruises were also required to sail at a reduced passenger capacity of 50%. All 2,828 people on Quantum of the Seas had tested negative when the ship departed Dec. 7. There was also increased sanitization and improved fresh air circulation.  Ultimately, those measures plus others that included mask-wearing at all times, social distancing and buffets staffed by servers in protective gear may have proven insufficient to combat a virus that's still raging in Europe and the U.S.  Scares like this incident and previous outbreaks on ships that stranded thousands of passengers have affected sentiment for consumers who have never cruised before. New York-based SpringOwl Asset Management has conducted surveys that show 80% of respondents who have never cruised say they would avoid getting on a cruise.  'There's reputational damage for the industry,' SpringOwl Chief Executive Officer Jason Ader said. 'People don't want to get stuck out on a ship and not be able to get off. That memory of people stuck on a ship because of an outbreak is still fresh, and it's going to take time to fade.'  Despite cruise ships mandating that passengers take coronavirus tests before boarding, the risk of disease transmission exists because of its long incubation period, which can be as long as 12 days.”

 

Full story at:

https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2020/dec/13/case-of-covid-scuttles-bid-to-revive-cruise-ship/?business

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Lisbon, NWSpain, Bordeaux/Brittany: Live/blog, June 2017 from Portugal to France along scenic Atlantic Coast on the Silver Spirit.  Now at 31,319 views.  Many interesting pictures, details for history, food, culture, etc.:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2511358

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From a top Washington Post columnist this past week, they had this headline: “How will the covid-19 vaccines affect your travel? with these highlights: “The news about coronavirus vaccines has given travelers hope that the pandemic will end in the foreseeable future and they’ll be able to hit the road. But how will the vaccines affect your travel next year?  In the short term, experts say, not much. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged Americans to avoid traveling for the holidays. Quarantines and other restrictions will probably last through the middle of next year as the vaccine is distributed. Leisure travel might resume later in 2021, and even then it is unlikely to return to normal.  Still, travelers are optimistic.  'The promising reports about two early covid-19 vaccines are music to travelers’ ears,' says Lisa Lee, a research professor in Virginia Tech’s Department of Population Health Sciences and a former CDC official. But she doesn’t expect authorities to have fully distributed the vaccine until mid-2021 at the absolute earliest. Public health experts say his timeline is about right. Karl Minges, who directs the University of New Haven’s master of public health program, warns travelers against booking a trip too soon. Although officials have suggested that some groups could receive a vaccine as early as December, he says, large-scale availability is unlikely before the second or third quarter of next year. Expect strict mask requirements to remain on planes and in hotels and other public spaces, even for people who have been inoculated. Quarantines and similar restrictions are also likely to stay in place for months, until there’s widespread confidence in the new immune therapies. And that could take a while."

 

Full story at:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/travel/how-will-vaccine-affect-travel/2020/12/09/d47328b0-3576-11eb-8d38-6aea1adb3839_story.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Panama Canal? Early 2017, Fort Lauderdale to San Francisco adventure through Panama Canal.  Our first stops in Colombia, Central America and Mexico, plus added time in the great Golden Gate City. Now at 30,268 views.

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From the Wall Street Journal late last week, they had this headline: “Shutting Borders Helped Australia Contain Covid-19. Now Reopening Them Is Proving Difficult” with this sub-headline: "The country wants to roll back some of the strictest domestic travel restrictions in the world, but many people wish they would stay in place."

 

Here are some of their story highlights: “Health officials and lawmakers in Australia say they are convinced that the country’s success in suppressing the coronavirus owes much to a series of border controls that are among the strictest in the Western world, although it has come at a cost to businesses.

Now, as Australia and other governments prepare to roll out vaccines and reopen their economies, deciding when to let people travel freely is proving difficult.Australia’s controls not only limit international arrivals to Australian citizens and permanent residents, or New Zealand residents living in Australia, but in many cases they also restrict people’s ability to move around the country.  Australia has recorded about 28,000 coronavirus cases, mostly among quarantined travelers from overseas, compared with more than 15 million cases in the U.S. Still, pandemic restrictions tipped Australia into its first recession in 29 years, illustrating the trade-off between the economy and health.  Australia is starting to roll back restrictions, the culmination of monthslong and often fractious talks between leaders of Australia’s states and territories, who are responsible for internal borders.”

 

Any reactions and/or added information from those who live downing these areas??

 

Full story at:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/shutting-borders-helped-australia-contain-covid-19-now-reopening-them-is-proving-difficult-11607781600?page=1

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

From late 2018, see “Holy Lands, Egypt, Jordan, Oman, Dubai, Greece, etc.”, with many visuals, details and ideas for the historic and scenic Middle East. Now at 19,206 views.  Connect at:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2607054-livenautica-greece-holy-lands-egypt-dubai-terrypix’s/

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 I perceive that there was almost unanimous support for the original lockdowns and border controls.

 As a nation,  we were and remain , united and accepting of the physical and financial discomfort.

I hear little real angst about continuing travel restrictions, although we are truly  "chomping at the bit" to be free...

We look at other places and are grateful for our unity and the good management of all tiers of government regardless of their left or right philosophy.

United we stood…Amen...

 

 

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On 12/10/2020 at 9:29 AM, TLCOhio said:

From CBS-TV news and other media sources this morning, they had this new headline: “After 'cruise to nowhere' cut short, Singapore says passenger doesn't have COVID-19” with these highlights: “A Royal Caribbean 'cruise to nowhere' was cut short and the ship returned to Singapore on Wednesday after an elderly passenger was diagnosed with the coronavirus, but the Health Ministry later said new tests on the man were negative.  The 83-year-old passenger on the Quantum of the Seas tested positive for COVID-19 after reporting to the ship’s medical center with diarrhea and was immediately isolated, Royal Caribbean and Singapore's Tourism Board said.”

 

Good news?  Which testing do you believe and trust most?  Is all of this "clear as mud"?

 

Full story at:

https://www.cbs8.com/article/news/nation-world/after-royal-carribean-cruise-to-nowhere-cut-short-singapore-says-passenger-doesnt-have-covid-19/507-7ff63851-5fcb-44ac-ac3c-405ddb65979c

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Amazon River-Caribbean 2015 adventure live/blog starting in Barbados. Many visuals from this amazing river and Caribbean Islands (Dutch ABC's, St. Barts, Dominica, Grenada, San Juan, etc.).  Now at 67,679 views:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2157696

False positive. As was the Alaska cruise that was canceled several months ago. Testing is not infallible for sure. Need a rapid backup test.

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15 hours ago, tgh said:

 I perceive that there was almost unanimous support for the original lockdowns and border controls.   As a nation,  we were and remain , united and accepting of the physical and financial discomfort.  I hear little real angst about continuing travel restrictions, although we are truly  "chomping at the bit" to be free...We look at other places and are grateful for our unity and the good management of all tiers of government regardless of their left or right philosophy.  United we stood…Amen...

 

Appreciate this above information and background from from tgh about your experiences in Australia.  Even with your sprawling and large country being equal in size to the USA's 48 states, your population is much, much smaller and maybe not as diverse as what we have here.  In the U.S., there have been a wide, wide range of opinions, impacts and governmental approaches.  Plus, with 335 million people here, it is harder to reach uniform agreement.  Does "one size fit all" work effectively here?  Per the NY Times this morning, the death totals on a per 100,000 population basis reflects part of this divide here.  On this deaths per 100K population, the top four states with those who died, in order, are New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts and  Connecticut.  The Covid-19 deaths in these four states have totaled 69,895, per the NY Times' comprehensive data.  These other states, however, in order, Vermont, Hawaii, Maine,  Alaska, Oregon, Utah and Washington, have been the lowest in deaths per 100K population.  Good news for those living there.  These six lowest states have had death rates at about one/eighth compared the top four highest states.  Clearly, population density has made a difference as to the impacts of Covid in our fifty different states.  Our state, Ohio, fortunately, is down at 34th on that deaths per 100K population listing.  Better here than being in the top five, but different states have been hit with varied timings, spikes ups more lately, etc. Did "flattening the curve" merely delay the problem?  Many factors have been involved as to the impacts, death rates, hospitalizations, etc.  More specific details and data is available at: 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/coronavirus-us-cases.html

 

From the Houston Business Journal, they had this headline: “Cruise industry's Covid shutdown costs billions of dollars, hundreds of thousands of jobs, CLIA says” with these highlights: “By the time cruises resume in the U.S., the industry will have been shutdown for about a year — if not longer.  Operations were suspended in March 2020 after the World Health Organization declared Covid-19 a pandemic, and the largest cruise companies aim to resume sailings in February and March 2021. That's resulting in a loss of billions of dollars of economic impact and hundreds of thousands of jobs, according to Cruise Lines International Association.  CLIA estimates that $14.1 billion of direct expenditures linked to the cruise industry and $32.7 billion in total expenditures created by the industry will have been lost by the end of 2020. By March 2021, those figures will reach $17.1 billion and $39 billion, respectively.  In 2019, the U.S. cruise industry created a $55.5 billion economic impact, up 5.3% from 2018. The 13.79 million U.S. passenger embarkations in 2019 — up nearly 8% from 2018 — created $25.14 billion in direct spending and supported 436,600 jobs, up 3.5% from 2018.”

 

Full story at:

https://www.bizjournals.com/birmingham/bizwomen/news/latest-news/2020/12/cruise-covid-shutdown-jobs-economic-impact.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Completed last summer Calgary, Jasper/Banff National Parks, Western Canada Rocky Mountaineer rail adventure, Vancouver, sailing up to Alaska, post-cruise excursion to Denali, etc.  Many visuals and details from our first in these scenic areas!  Live/blog at: 

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2682584-live-terryohio-silver-muse-alaska-canadarockies-pix’s/

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4 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

These other states, however, in order, Vermont, Hawaii, Maine,  Alaska, Oregon, Utah and Washington, have been the lowest in deaths per 100K population.  Good news for those living there.

Those are also the most physically isolated states (except for maybe Utah), which may also have something to do with it.

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46 minutes ago, taxatty said:

Those are also the most physically isolated states (except for maybe Utah), which may also have something to do with it.


Physically isolation plus a low number of dense population centers certainly have helped.  Oregon and Washington both have high density cities west of the Cascades but the eastern parts of both states are for the most part sparsely populated and relatively wide spread.  Alaska kind of speaks for itself in terms of isolation and sparse population.  Utah with a couple exceptions is sparsely populated and wide spread.  Can’t speak for Vermont and Maine as I’m not familiar with them and in fact the only two states I’ve never been to.  

 

 Hawaii is interesting as they probably were the first to literally, and maybe only state, to close the state to outside visitors when the pandemic started.  Hawaii loosen up a bit but you must have an approved Covid-19 PRC or spend 14 days in a state approved quarantine facility.   My son lives on Kauai and they are even stricter than the rest of the state and require the 14 days quarantine regardless of the PRC test results for even visitors from the other islands.  That hasn’t come without economic repercussions as my son says some of the hotels and resorts on Kauai may have already gone under.      

Edited by Randyk47
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