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flyingshoes

Restart cruise protocols

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Posted (edited)

https://www.traveloffpath.com/cruise-lines-reopening-dates-of-sailings-and-what-you-need-to-know/?fbclid=IwAR3KFyiMMq86rUUVkCDQHTVIMBhs7LRrPDp_UHaGo-juCT89oCcNBfyyOlY

 

Regent in particular seems to have decided their onboard experience measures upon restart (click on sub links within article).  They seem manageable and even positive (reducing passenger capacity, dining separation, no mention of masking, etc).   Silversea implies that nothing much will change from the past, enhancing physical separation.

 

Crystal still in progress.  We won't book if we don't know what to expect.

Edited by flyingshoes

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Posted (edited)

Based on what I’m seeing in event management, with procedures changing and evolving weekly, I strongly suspect Regent may have jumped the gun if they’re promising what they have announced will be their actual protocols on relaunching.  If anything, CLIA’s delay shows the industry’s challenge in balancing everyone’s desire for a pre-COVID cruise experience and still control people spreading their droplets presymptomatically and asymptomatically.  
 

For US-based lines like Crystal, with 20+ states showing sharply rising infection rates and other alarming indicators, it was way too early for any line to promise that masks will not be needed in a few months.

 

[Edited to add, 29 states with averages rising, as of this morning.  Yikes!]

 

Vince

Edited by BWIVince

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I agree with Vince.  I remember early on some cruise lines were listing their new procedures but to me it seemed premature until everything gets finalized and it has not been finalized across the cruise line industry.

 

Yes I agree it would be nice to know the changes that Crystal will implement.  When Crystal announced the new itineraries they noted that the new procedures and policies were being developed and will be announced soon.

 

My understanding is that a meeting is set with the cruise lines to discuss new requirements which I believe is either later this month or in early July so I am sure that is a pre-requisite to Crystal finalizing and also making available their new procedures/protocols.

 

What Regent shows is nice but I suspect the final requirements will go a lot further than this as I don't believe it lists (I took a quick look so I might have missed some of this) it doesn't list several things that come to mind.  

 

For example, elevators.  Will they be in use.  How many people can go in.  For example, Hilton Hotel will only allow one person at a time.  

 

Will staff wear masks?

 

Will there be changes to door handles?  I know my son's company is working on something along these lines.  Just saying.

 

How about the laundry rooms?  Changes?  Will they be open?  

 

How will tender service work?

 

Procedure if someone gets COVID including where they will be quarantined.  

 

Will guests entering the ships and crew go through a special entry which sanitizes them?  I know this is being contemplated by at least some cruise lines and seems logical for all.  

 

Personally there were many more things that I would want to know which Regent hasn't listed.  

 

Keith

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Posted (edited)

Keith, yes, some details missing.  Except for masks for staff (deal killer), laundry rooms (provide free or reduced rate central laundry), and elevators (perhaps provide an operator for each one - we seldom use them but know many require them) could be managed on a reduced capacity ship, ditto tender loading.  Not sure if Regent could be profitable without significantly raising fares though.  The ship fogging thing was news to me but sounds good on the surface (helps with noro as well presumably).

 

Regardless, Crystal is pushing sales heavily (I receive emails daily) but we won't book if the experience to be received is unknown.  

Edited by flyingshoes

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9 hours ago, flyingshoes said:

https://www.traveloffpath.com/cruise-lines-reopening-dates-of-sailings-and-what-you-need-to-know/?fbclid=IwAR3KFyiMMq86rUUVkCDQHTVIMBhs7LRrPDp_UHaGo-juCT89oCcNBfyyOlY

 

Regent in particular seems to have decided their onboard experience measures upon restart (click on sub links within article).  They seem manageable and even positive (reducing passenger capacity, dining separation, no mention of masking, etc).   Silversea implies that nothing much will change from the past, enhancing physical separation.

 

Crystal still in progress.  We won't book if we don't know what to expect.


I believe the regent protocols were announced on June 1st.  As they are several weeks old and so much changes on a daily basis, I suspect they will be heavily revised by the time regent sails..someday,

 

Nancy

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1 hour ago, flyingshoes said:

Keith, yes, some details missing.  Except for masks for staff (deal killer), laundry rooms (provide free or reduced rate central laundry), and elevators (perhaps provide an operator for each one - we seldom use them but know many require them) could be managed on a reduced capacity ship, ditto tender loading.  Not sure if Regent could be profitable without significantly raising fares though.  The ship fogging thing was news to me but sounds good on the surface (helps with noro as well presumably).

 

Regardless, Crystal is pushing sales heavily (I receive emails daily) but we won't book if the experience to be received is unknown.  

Short terms costs will be higher.  No doubt about that.

 

I was watching the other day on the National News plans that Hilton has and some of them adds to cost.  Some does not.  For example, when someone checks out of a room it will stay vacant for 72 hours.  That certainly is a hit to cost.

 

Some changes will add to costs for the cruise lines.  Some changes will not.

 

But right now there is a cost and no revenue.  Cruise lines might lose money for awhile but this will not be the first time this has happened.  

 

My only point is that although Regent published something a lot of details need to be filled in.  A lot can change in just a few days.

 

There is so much out there that we will see on land and at sea.  My son has gone through with me so many changes they are implementing in large food areas on land and yes they will have benefits that go well beyond this specific virus.  Will this raise costs?  Yes.  How this will be made up time will tell.  Take dental practices.  Many have added new components to the well being of the staff and of the patients and in many practices this raised costs and this has been passed on in many cases to the consumer with a higher cost to them.  Some salons have raised cost in cases where they have increased their costs.  

 

As I said I know there is a meeting with the cruise lines on all of this and while they all have started to put in plans to deal with sailing again I suspect they will all change to some extent.

 

I am reminded they will be under the radar screen more than most places so the expectations will be high.  Ironically I believe ships have offered a safer environment versus airlines and hotels when it comes to health but because people are on them for a much longer time and because of all of the reporting requirements they end up being under a microscope.  I know the requirements will be more stringent for them than other places.  Just think about the airlines.  In the USA no one has made any requirements of them such as masks, distancing, cleansing procedures, etc.  They are doing it on their own which means inconsistencies and IMHO it means they are likely not doing all they can do to provide the safest environment in terms of the virus.

 

Keith

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I had a friend who recently stayed at the Wynn.  He had to travel out to Las Vegas to help wind up a family member's estate.  He was very reluctant to take the trip but he decided to go.  He went in part because the Wynn was very upfront what measures it was taking to mitigate Covid-19.  I think he indicated that the Wynn posted a 150+  pages of guidelines that detailed said measures.  During his visit he indicated that the measures were being followed and the Wynn was not paying just lip service.  On his last day, he walked to some other resorts and it was evident that many of the basic protocols were not being followed.  His take away was that being proactive and provide the guidelines is important but also is the follow through.  His visit to the Wynn created a level of trust.  If he went back to Las Vegas, this is where he would stay.  While it is important for the cruise lines to publish their protocols and measures, the actual implementation is just as important.   Those that deliver will create a level of trust.     

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1 hour ago, Keith1010 said:

 Ironically I believe ships have offered a safer environment versus airlines and hotels when it comes to health but because people are on them for a much longer time and because of all of the reporting requirements they end up being under a microscope.

The other thing that puts them under the microscope is traceability.  There's a huge difference between airplanes and ships with ships more like nursing homes.  If you get on an airplane and get COVID, it's pretty much impossible to link the infection to the airplane; was it the plane, the restaurant, the taxi, hotel, or what.  If you pass all the tests getting on the ship and then several people get sick 10 days into the cruise, it's pretty easy to connect the sickness with the cruise.

 

That's not a situation a lot of travel providers are faced with.

 

Roy

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31 minutes ago, rafinmd said:

The other thing that puts them under the microscope is traceability.  There's a huge difference between airplanes and ships with ships more like nursing homes.  If you get on an airplane and get COVID, it's pretty much impossible to link the infection to the airplane; was it the plane, the restaurant, the taxi, hotel, or what.  If you pass all the tests getting on the ship and then several people get sick 10 days into the cruise, it's pretty easy to connect the sickness with the cruise.

 

That's not a situation a lot of travel providers are faced with.

 

Roy

Roy, I agree with most of your points.  I say most because I would not have used nursing homes to describe ships but I understand what you were getting at.

 

With ships being under a microscope they are more identified with things like Norovirus whereas in reality the vast majority of the incidents likely  originate on land with some in flight.

 

Keith

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I am currently staying at a Hilton and there are no signs limiting people in the lifts nor are rooms left vacant for 72 hours.  The hotel was at 100% occupancy on Saturday night and yet I was able to change to a new room last night which had been vacated earlier yesterday.

 

They have a security seal on the door, indicating it has been thoroughly cleaned.  Even the remote control was wrapped up.  I ran my alcohol wipes over all the services I would be touching, just in case, and then used my hand sanitizer.

 

Masks are required in all public areas.  Don’t know where the National News you were watching @Keith1010 but in this case it was fake news.  Marriott is adding a cleaning surcharge but there is no such thing now at the Hilton I am in and I asked the Hotel manager about this and he said he has not heard anything about it.
 

Cruise lines I think are much more problematic and CLIA, CDC and cruiselines all have to hammer out the many details which will take a while.  Cruising before next year, whilst something we would like to see, is most likely magical thinking.

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Here's a thought about the Hilton Hotels - there is a difference between company run and franchisee run hotels. There are things that the company can require the franchisee to do as spelled out in their agreement. Since this is all "new", I'd think that at least at this point there are things that the company can not mandate that the franchisee do, because no one ever thought of them before. See my comment about "new".

 

Patty

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31 minutes ago, cruisr said:

I am currently staying at a Hilton and there are no signs limiting people in the lifts nor are rooms left vacant for 72 hours.  The hotel was at 100% occupancy on Saturday night and yet I was able to change to a new room last night which had been vacated earlier yesterday.

 

They have a security seal on the door, indicating it has been thoroughly cleaned.  Even the remote control was wrapped up.  I ran my alcohol wipes over all the services I would be touching, just in case, and then used my hand sanitizer.

 

Masks are required in all public areas.  Don’t know where the National News you were watching @Keith1010 but in this case it was fake news.  Marriott is adding a cleaning surcharge but there is no such thing now at the Hilton I am in and I asked the Hotel manager about this and he said he has not heard anything about it.
 

Cruise lines I think are much more problematic and CLIA, CDC and cruiselines all have to hammer out the many details which will take a while.  Cruising before next year, whilst something we would like to see, is most likely magical thinking.

Cruisr the program is rolling out later this month. 

 

This is when you will see changes.

 

This includes:


One person in an elevator at one time.

 

Keeping room vacant 72 hours after the room has been vacated.

 

No TV remote controls.  You will be able to use a smart device as the TV control.

 

No in room dining.

 

Placing a room seal on the door after the room has been cleaned so guests will know no one has entered the room.

 

Contactless Check In

 

New disenfection procedures and cleaning products.

 

Cleaning Fitness Centers several times and closing them down during these times and reducing number of people who can use them at any given time.

 

Yes, the national news had this right.  As an FYI I am not a subscriber to the term fake news.  I do realize that news like many things has/can have inaccuracies.  Often it is because someone didn't take the time to get the information down right or just misunderstood or the person who told them something was wrong.  At the same time I see the glass as half full. 

 

Keith

 

Keith

 

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I guess time will tell 🙂

Right now the Hilton I am at has not been advised on anything of this nature.  Not saying its not happening just the frontline hotel employees have not heard anything yet.  Maybe Hilton telling the news before they tell the hotels.  Who knows.

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I stayed at a high tier Hilton last week and none of the above were in place.  Masks were worn by all staff and there were only prepackaged snacks in the amenity area. There were self-hand sanitation stations throughout.  The pool was not limited -which I never use anyway- however, the fitness center was closed.  I felt comfortable and do not see any more drastic measures needed at the time.

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27 minutes ago, MsCrystalina said:

I stayed at a high tier Hilton last week and none of the above were in place.  Masks were worn by all staff and there were only prepackaged snacks in the amenity area. There were self-hand sanitation stations throughout.  The pool was not limited -which I never use anyway- however, the fitness center was closed.  I felt comfortable and do not see any more drastic measures needed at the time.

Again they noted it would be end of June.

 

In the meantime it makes sense what they are doing until they get the other things in place.

 

Not sure at that point if it will be a phased rollout or how it will work but it's not just reported on the national news.  Hilton themselves issued an extensive press release on this which I saw on their website.

 

Keith

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I must say I’m amazed that a hotel, any hotel, any place, was at 100% occupancy! Wise for them to make hay while the sun is shining for them, that’s for sure.

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To follow up as this may be something that cruise lines may have to do.  After the Hilton I checked into a luxury Hyatt that just reopened and on a weekday, they were at 75% occupancy.  Both the Hilton and Hyatt were waterfront properties in desirable resort areas.

 

At check in at the Hyatt I was advised that no staff will be allowed to enter my room during the stay.  That meant no maid service, no room service, etc.  If you wanted more towels, or the trash emptied you were to call guest services and they would leave what you needed outside the door.  If you wanted trash pick up you would leave that at the door and the staff would empty it, sanitize it, and return to you outside your door.  No room service but takeaway was available to dining in one of the two restaurants in the hotel.

 

Can you imagine if one has to leave trash outside the door on Crystal?  It would look interesting walking the halls.  Or, it could be like pick up of trash in my town.  My neighborhood day is Monday.  Deck 5 can be Monday, Deck 8 on Tuesday, etc.   No maid service but you can have towels dropped at your door.  
 

Interesting times.

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Interestingly enough, both programs were things hotel chains have been doing for years, and gaining in guest acceptance.  The no-housekeeping option (supply drop on demand) was something the big chains previously offered for a credit, and was getting some real traction in the past couple of years.  Similarly, I stayed in two of Hyatt's full service (Hyatt Regency brand) properties last year that also offered takeaway in lieu of actual room service, though they did have a contactless door-drop option for an extra fee where they would hang the bag on the door handle.

 

I wouldn't rule out such things for ships, but I think the guest acceptance rate being well-tracked and known by this point made both services an easy option and a quick pivot for hotels.

 

Vince

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21 minutes ago, BWIVince said:

Interestingly enough, both programs were things hotel chains have been doing for years, and gaining in guest acceptance.  The no-housekeeping option (supply drop on demand) was something the big chains previously offered for a credit, and was getting some real traction in the past couple of years.  Similarly, I stayed in two of Hyatt's full service (Hyatt Regency brand) properties last year that also offered takeaway in lieu of actual room service, though they did have a contactless door-drop option for an extra fee where they would hang the bag on the door handle.

 

I wouldn't rule out such things for ships, but I think the guest acceptance rate being well-tracked and known by this point made both services an easy option and a quick pivot for hotels.

 

Vince

i had no problem at all with any of the restrictions.  I always “Make a Green Choice” to quote Stariott or Marriwood (officially Marriott) and would do so even if no points were offered.  I also stayed for “free” by utilizing Chase UR points and Hyatt free night certificates that come with CC renewal.  I always tell my room stewardess to skip nightly service so I can give her time off and only have them to the morning service every other day.  So, that was not a problem though Hilton was doing housekeeping every day I kept the DND sign on whilst staying there.

 

Masks were of course required in all public areas.  If cruises go to that, that is a deal breaker for me.  In a hotel I am fine wearing my mask as I transit the lobby and go to the lifts, or take the stairs to my room.  The great majority of my time at the above mentioned resorts were not in public areas.  Wearing a mask all day on a cruise ship, whilst at sea or wearing one all night onboard in all public places is a no go.

 

 

 

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Like most things people will have to decide what requirements will result or prevent them from Cruising.

 

Speaking for myself it wasn't that long ago when I would not have considered wearing a mask gong out.  Now I feel naked without having a mask with me.

 

If someone said you needed to wear a mask to board the ship, I would and regardless of what happens with the virus going forward our new norm will be to bring with us a set of masks when we travel whether later this year, next year or as long as we are healthy to travel and that includes car trips, land trips involving flights and cruises.

 

Let's just see how things unfold and then each person can decide for themselves and I expect like most things adjustments will be made based on experience and also based on the circumstances during the respective time frames of the cruises.

 

Keith

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Masks are nothing new on a cruise ship, I was in Dubrovnik a few years back and a Japanese cruise ship ( I think it was the Asuka II former Crystal Harmony) came in and most of the passengers debarked with masks.

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3 hours ago, resistk said:

Masks are nothing new on a cruise ship, I was in Dubrovnik a few years back and a Japanese cruise ship ( I think it was the Asuka II former Crystal Harmony) came in and most of the passengers debarked with masks.

They walk around Tokyo that way.  

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There is a difference (and happening here in the US) between people wanting and wearing and being required to wear masks.   What does a ship do if required and a passenger refuses to wear a mask?

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55 minutes ago, ctjon said:

There is a difference (and happening here in the US) between people wanting and wearing and being required to wear masks.   What does a ship do if required and a passenger refuses to wear a mask?

I would say like refusing to attend muster.  Sent home from the next port of call.

 

Roy

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I agree with Roy...  Originally in the travel industry, we were trying to include carve-outs for people who found masks medically uncomfortable because of other conditions, but now with mounting evidence about the effectiveness of the masks, and lack of effectiveness of other techniques without masks, it's really being treated as a safety risk to have guests around other guests without face coverings.  Initially we thought this may be medically protected, but for my clients that have run the issue by their legal teams (and I know this is open to interpretation, which is why I say it that way), the safety risk of having someone not wearing a face covering outweigh's a person's "right" not to wear one -- especially since it's the only physical tool we have at this point to limit the spread of droplets from potentially infected guests in the same room.

 

Vince

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