Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
ellie1145

Come sail with me on a virtual cruise on Majestic Princess to Fiji!

Recommended Posts

7 minutes ago, AF-1 said:

So if this is the Gov't house; when did the govt move to Canberra from Sydney? 

 

Although it is called Government House it was only used by the first 10 Governors, between 1800 and 1847, basically as their country residence.  It was safer and more pleasant than Sydney at the time. 

 

Governor Phillips had a small cottage built in 1790 by convict labour. It was not built of stone or brick, but it had extensive gardens. It was 44ft X 16ft so not huge. It fell into disrepair and was replaced in 1899 by a proper building made of brick, measuring about 60ft x 24 ft.

 

Governor Fitzroy was the last to use it, and he stopped visiting it when his wife was tragically killed in a carriage accident, when he was the driver. After that it was leased, and at one time was a school.

 

So it was really only technically used by the governor in the very early days of the colony, and was not really a Government building such as you would find in Canberra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the history lesson.  I flew into Canberra with the President' s and knew that was the capital.  Thanks for the update

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Wow AF-1. That must be quite a story! 

 

Which president? 

 

OMG. is AF-1 short for Air Force 1??? 

I’m speechless (and that doesn’t happen often).

 

Did you get to see much of Canberra? I’m guessing it’s a pretty modern city? 

 

Id love to see more of Australia but guess that could be a long time coming. 

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

 

We walk round the outside of the house and enter the oldest part of the building, where we are shown the three rooms which formed the original building, used by Governor John Hunter in 1799.

 

I have always been fascinated by the stories of how Australia was colonised, so it is amazing to be walking round a building which was used by the first Governors of this land. 

 

It was the first governor of Sydney, Governor Phillip, who discovered the fertile land in Parramatta. George III had ordered him to begin cultivation as soon as he arrived in Sydney, but much of the seed they carried had been destroyed by weevils, and this, combined with the high temperatures of the Australian summer, and the poor sandy soil, meant that their survival was in doubt.

 

He decided to explore further and discovered this beautiful area, with what appeared to be thousands of fertile acres,  a flat plain, and a river to provide plenty of fresh water. It must have seemed ideal and it became known as ‘Rose Hill.’ It was essential for the survival of the colony to find a place where they could grow crops, and farm animals. Without that the colony would undoubtedly perish.

 

Thus is was that a settlement was planned out, and small houses, or huts, were built to accommodate the families of convicts of good character, who would be encouraged to farm their own piece of land. Governor Phillip had a small cottage built on the hill, just 44ft x 16ft (approx 14m x 5m). It was quite primitive, being built of mud and wattle, but it must have had a wonderful view, and it was certainly better than living in Sydney. 

 

Compared to the government buildings of today, it was very small, but it must have been a relief to escape the growing settlement of Sydney, with its rising crime and unsanitary conditions. 

 

The original house was not of good construction, and by the time of Governor John Hunter it had fallen into disrepair, so a new residence was built, of more substantial materials such as bricks, made by the convicts. The house was larger, being 60ft x 24ft (18m x 7m) and now had an upstairs suite of rooms, and cellars.

 

It is extraordinary to think that everything had to be made by the convicts, from the 20,000 nails manufactured by the smiths, to the cedar planks and bricks. 

 

 The house was extended in 1815 to provide a two storey block, with two single storey end pavilions. This extended building was used by Governor Macquarie, whose name we see all over Sydney. He came in for some criticism for his use of scarce convict labour to build public works, including the Old Government House.

 

FF232F65-9F0C-48E4-A236-57415E7CD821.thumb.jpeg.1ebcc88fa87528ff7411158bb65dd0b7.jpeg

It is cool inside which is a relief from the rapidly rising outside temperatures, and we walk along the corridors into the first three rooms.

 

We are thrilled to see that the rooms are furnished with colonial furniture and textiles. Many of the fabrics have been copied from originals, and they add to the sense of history.

 

It’s very atmospheric, and I can imagine what it must have been like for those pioneering men and women who lived there, and faced the hardships of being so far from home.

BB55B22E-4378-4614-B843-E1091B0262B4.thumb.jpeg.610b813a8a3c44d916792211792890fb.jpeg

 

B329EE5A-4C46-4157-8542-1752EBEF388E.thumb.jpeg.684baa940151fda6e3052a3133412875.jpeg

 

There are some lovely fireplaces and we stop to examine the beautiful china displayed on a sideboard.

 

46A09311-5DD8-43BF-AFA4-EB5A84A34C9D.thumb.jpeg.8e9f029a4ded769040f2d4b0978f0f47.jpeg

 

EE585605-44EE-4204-97D1-133365041391.thumb.jpeg.3cdaec4eb5f250411a9a4f3c4c3fb94c.jpeg

 

BFDA3FBA-BF03-4EDF-8475-6460B65B20D5.thumb.jpeg.e9ffdce172325a7460866a02f2139931.jpeg

 

We move to another room, where there is even a piano which would have been shipped from England. It must have been a comfort to have such familiar items around them, and one can imagine the Governor’s wife playing music on the piano, maybe with a touch of homesickness.

 

FE733EA9-2540-4EDA-BA4C-F2BE57AE097D.thumb.jpeg.7fff947606fea4573545129890edc132.jpeg

 

FDA93B3B-4373-4C94-8B43-4250996C77F4.thumb.jpeg.443e5380f19ee983d677f106f2676138.jpeg

 

134BACBD-B724-46B2-8EB9-C5630AE8E8F9.thumb.jpeg.9f7550d6e6bad4bd69e804c8e4cf3f68.jpeg

 

B9AEDDEC-3D11-4617-8322-35D00740FB3C.thumb.jpeg.cfb6780536430f825dcefa6b5b80bbd9.jpeg

 

How hard life must have been when  England was so far away, and communication impossible. There must have been a constant feat of crops failing, or of falling ill to disease. 

 

However, compared to the living conditions of those in the township, this house must have seemed palatial.

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

 

FB3940B5-33DA-46B0-97C1-4D378C8CC74A.thumb.jpeg.47cdcee309a5d82bde7b3ba9e4c7a239.jpeg

 

We emerge into a corridor and are shown a Grandfather clock which was made by a skilled convict who was later given his freedom. Many of these men had committed very minimal ‘crimes’ and yet they were torn from all they knew and held dear, to be transported to this new and unforgiving land. 

 

In this room the governor would have sat and carried out the day to day business of governing this growing colony, when he visited the house. He planned improvements to the house and the township and reclaimed the grounds surrounding the house.

 

6F5DDCE9-4F33-4BFB-989B-D69641FC3257.thumb.jpeg.1258e5029e655c9f829bdbb3aca94c62.jpeg

 

2699D39B-C5B0-4A7C-AA56-7966C4D13FB0.thumb.jpeg.d6b75143bdfc12be45a2560b367eeb90.jpeg

 

60E7F171-5770-4030-8705-D16B118D060D.thumb.jpeg.a3842fec4daae09cad6eb537a3abd234.jpeg

 

EAC4DDE9-ED8F-423D-AF39-156CE4992E6F.thumb.jpeg.24ef8068b705af26a0c2643bf71bfb2b.jpeg

 

In this room we are shown a glass panel in the floor which reveals the original stone floor.

 

EE0A07FC-CF3A-4B59-ABD2-EF29A37AE8D2.thumb.jpeg.c0afcddfeaca765dbf537b1f613cd5c3.jpeg

 

 

12DBE5F3-1174-4381-9A16-EDA5DA282EDD.thumb.jpeg.4fb3d27abbf4921c6f172b6bbc339336.jpeg

 

Later on in the tour we are able to see some of the original bricks, made by the convicts, which have been exposed and covered in glass.

 

3D3AFD87-1E47-4085-9C78-37846E71CCCC.thumb.jpeg.2fa94bd301b78245aba6e97a8dd4aa8f.jpeg

 

The bricks are revealed to be of pretty poor construction.

 

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

Elizabeth Macquarie, the governor’s wife, would have had much influence in the extending of the house into the elegant Palladian style country house we now see. She had an interest in architecture, and had brought with her from England an architectural pattern book. 

 

Additional rooms were added, as well as servants’ quarters, officers’ quarters, and even a pigeon house. By 1821 it boasted a ‘water closet.’ The gardens were also landscaped, and, as they no longer needed to be used for food production, exotic species of trees, such as mulberries, oranges, English oaks and elms were planted. It must have been a pretty idyllic setting compared to the colony in Sydney.

 

Just as we finish the first few rooms another guide arrives and takes over from Hannah. This gentleman is very knowledgeable and gives us a fascinating insight into the history of the house.

 

6B4D0FC6-67FB-48DA-B592-A388EBB5E75B.thumb.jpeg.a8999268e97f45ebd3f8175c4682cc7a.jpeg

 

CD1F978B-07B4-4C0D-A3AD-5C22804041A2.thumb.jpeg.cdd9a4865b0db89f42a5d31f9e7b80da.jpeg

 

DD44A595-0CC5-4641-8CDF-FA896B1D2815.thumb.jpeg.a79cdee7b9465545800a9a62e7ca3496.jpeg

We walk into a large drawing room and he points out that one of the two doors  on either side of the fireplace is actually false, but it was added to balance the symmetry, which was aesthetically very important at that time.

DF88B72E-7805-45F3-AB3C-F07FE07EE8F5.thumb.jpeg.93c5128be6e85e0e9c96745b72cc33f7.jpeg

 

237C439A-82A1-4547-84EA-0E70CF1DD106.thumb.jpeg.1074bdad0dbacda52678d283faea6d6f.jpeg

 

We move into another room which is a bedroom, and which has a large four poster bed with a canopy over it.

 

18644683-B8DA-4281-9DA9-7F75593822A9.thumb.jpeg.812f9fca2bd3bbfc5b3f8f89654db295.jpeg

 

In those days, bedrooms were used for entertaining as well as sleeping, and the governor would have received visitors in his bedroom  as well as in the parlour. What an odd thought that is!

DE22D1B4-129D-4BD4-82DD-A7404EED8EBF.thumb.jpeg.be8c71d60092b2d9812042a53d47f70c.jpeg

An exquisitely inlaid box sits on a table at the foot of the bed.

 

7A8310AE-BD05-494F-9469-7D87ADDDF886.thumb.jpeg.96e52b12640eb554fa2577b28aa4ac8e.jpeg

 

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We explore the room, which is very well furnished. We do not feel hurried and we are able to ask questions, as we are the only people visiting the house. 

49C3FB5B-7D85-4D73-A145-F79A1AEBA774.thumb.jpeg.f7d7f884eca7852771dc775dd781611f.jpeg

 

53B71503-F726-4A33-BCC5-CDC34F311214.thumb.jpeg.c5cc9e07316581721e5cdafdb4379126.jpeg

 

C3791CBD-02A4-45C8-B024-5347FFA81CAC.thumb.jpeg.8d73c4302eaabc0cd8ff8001d301f805.jpeg

 

167C9567-E5F8-44B8-8CC2-9BB190D68C14.thumb.jpeg.c5d2d31f1555546e7b61693dec26aa07.jpeg

 

A commode.

119638D4-A09A-41D3-9026-AE1BA1381930.thumb.jpeg.16f79f9d4d34271647261a6205e158e9.jpeg

 

Next door there is another room with a small bed in it.

21B730A1-8F17-4CEC-9D1B-697017A0BF8D.thumb.jpeg.db37d218fb5d6b7b721566dce7036de0.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

We move into a long hallway. The black and white tiles on the floor are not real, they are actually painted. This view gives an idea of the spaciousness of this beautiful house.

 

3758898D-A5DC-4FBD-AAA9-27BDC0F6F36C.thumb.jpeg.f9a8cf59938b10c15e6edd4ed0ac688a.jpeg

 

893107A3-EC75-4085-91AE-B2A8C81623B1.thumb.jpeg.78734eeba3c9df16d0ab1c4cc5fdf758.jpeg

 

957B8ECC-6470-45B1-B1B5-3893EE7A1659.thumb.jpeg.c4d4c3ba7ba0fcaef79c3b4ca896698f.jpeg

 

DF2A9C03-A258-4B53-919D-EFAF2E2D2E30.thumb.jpeg.74e3a1a4a446590a3490e1cdb172786e.jpeg

 

We are shown a menu which was used at the Farewell Dinner given by Governor Macquarie for Colonel and Mrs Patterson.

 

It could have been served in any great house in England, and contains such things as turkey and roast beef, as well as wild duck and stewed oysters. 

 

Amusingly, and appropriately, the cook appears to be called Mrs Ovens, and the Butler, Mr Fopp.

 

C6A5745D-22DE-405A-827E-03FE3197F4AB.thumb.jpeg.b80d02b29098dd4d74c6157be76c1af0.jpeg

 

D3765F66-6594-45DA-AC7F-98E3F2C21147.thumb.jpeg.44ec8b8c5b609c75c06d284afad578b6.jpeg

 

FED02410-46BC-4159-9AD0-92072AC275E7.thumb.jpeg.b1c8242079f3cd15947e354f55efad5a.jpeg

 

46EB8F38-BB02-42FD-83C2-9C5A8F1194ED.thumb.jpeg.ced5d42b51c4f90871adca808ba880d9.jpeg

 

The bells which would have been used to summon servants.

 

722F8084-9AC8-4385-8087-0159F9809E3A.jpeg

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

0111AB56-6112-4113-9C3D-BABEDC75EBB3.thumb.jpeg.28734f4aafb3ce534717a8e38f5c9003.jpeg

We see more evidence of the bricks which were made by convict labour, and which appear to be quite primitive.

 

 Governor Macquarie and his family used the house a lot before his return to England in 1822. His successor, Governor Brisbane, also enjoyed the house and even built an Observatory there. His wife continued the planting of the park which Elizabeth Macquarie had begun. A Bath House was added with a shower bath. 

 

However, the next governor, Governor Darling, relocated to Sydney, using the Old Government House as a winter retreat. In 1828 the British Treasury decided that in future, all building maintenance and furniture costs should be borne by the NSW Colonial Treasury. This resulted in the decline of the OGH as it was felt to be ‘indulgent’ to have two houses for the governor.

 

Governor Burke, enjoyed escaping to the house as much as possible, but once it was decided to build a new Government House in Sydney, it became difficult to fund the OGH.

 

By the time of the next Governor, Governor Cripps, it was agreed that in future the governor, himself, would be responsible for the upkeep of the house. It was duly leased out. 

 

Governor Fitzroy’s wife was sadly killed in a carriage accident in 1847, and following that tragedy the house was boarded up.

 

Over the next 50 or so years, the house was leased to a variety of people, and in 1909 it was leased to a school. The King’s School is the oldest independent school in Australia, and many important people were educated there. 

 

We have really enjoyed our tour so far, but now we reach the school room, which we find fascinating.

 

It is laid out with desk and benches, and on the wall are some salutary lessons in how to behave.....

 

54C7236C-F53D-4FD2-B648-A35FDEB4CB7F.thumb.jpeg.aec52c35a40fec4f2f8bdeb8c0f76ab7.jpeg

 

5728489E-94BF-4863-B30D-B6ED9999B0E8.thumb.jpeg.0204674deb125ec1305aa56a6db8c467.jpeg

 

0BC2F64F-5B6B-458A-A94E-E5CE9B0CD8EE.thumb.jpeg.aa130046ccd17cd50be38380ab6ab8ec.jpeg

 

909FC13F-AD05-45B0-933E-1D2953DDE3E2.thumb.jpeg.f29b8be01c334821e8ddad3f80432e26.jpeg

 

2D3856F4-1B07-46D1-A62E-A036DC57F2FA.thumb.jpeg.afd085d749834d1d715835b8269e978c.jpeg

 

040500EF-3F7B-4A00-B423-6F777A5F95BE.thumb.jpeg.be1d3374d39625e2ff83eff30c4e7289.jpeg

 

F54E6108-1333-4803-97FD-270D3FA53930.thumb.jpeg.ff91c65b6f0924329773f8080eb362bb.jpeg

 

FF67BB2C-D19F-4331-B092-87E1A3988369.thumb.jpeg.7610e31464790ef43f7579c7b82fa6ce.jpeg

Children would have used slates to write on, and on the table are the common means of punishment for those boys who failed to live up to the exacting standards of behaviour. 

 

We also see a beautiful sampler, which must have been sewed by a child, Mary Johnson, in 1807. It is exquisitely embroidered.  

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

We walk through the kitchens which are full of artefacts, and we spend some time with our guide looking at all the items. Although our own National Trust houses are wonderful, many of the ones we have visited in the U.K. do not have as many artefacts available to look at, so it’s brilliant to see that the OGH has been so lovingly restored by the placing of items which would have been in use at the time.

 

068DE6BB-7564-47B4-900C-7FBC6D37FB56.thumb.jpeg.0a6cf99cd76df747c71ff82e35cd24e4.jpeg

 

There is an oven and a big fireplace with a saucepan hanging over what would have been an open fire. There is a range of copper saucepans over the mantle piece.

 

2481C791-C50A-4C59-93E3-5BAA31CE7E1B.thumb.jpeg.2d09957b4fa88e6bf1912802c07f82b6.jpeg

 

Our guide tells us that at the time of Governor Macquarie, curries were a popular dinner party dish for the wealthy, and that included rabbit curry as well as beef, poultry or veal.

 

Trade had begun between India and New South Wales in 1790, when it became obvious that they needed to supplement the very limited and inadequate rations that were available to the colony.

 

Spices were important in cooking throughout the British Empire, so they became an important part of the diet of these early colonists. They probably made food taste better as, of course, they didn’t have the benefit of refrigeration, and food was often ‘on the turn.’  

 

92433F26-F9B1-4126-900D-65E3A418B79B.thumb.jpeg.3c2545312bde87d131a3ac76090f2088.jpeg

 

In front of the bread oven is an old iron which would have had to be heated on the fire.

 

DFBDC56F-FAAE-4BF2-B505-A2BF9D6C7ADD.thumb.jpeg.425c4faff64be72baa9634fe85e3a028.jpeg

The fire would have been kept alive by the use of bellows, seen here at the bottom of the picture.

 

C9A55E6F-1DEC-4B52-99E1-363FF76A7026.thumb.jpeg.9931a825be344ad3c506b8a52835bf69.jpeg

At the bottom of the picture is a pair of butter pats. As I am, unfortunately rather ancient (though I don’t date to 1845) I do remember seeing these in Sainsburys as a child, back in the 50s. This food store had long marble counters and butter was kept on them in a block. You asked for the amount you required, and a lump would be cut off, and the butter pats would be used to mould the lump into a small block, with the ridges making a pattern on the sides of the butter. This was then wrapped in grease proof paper. No doubt these butter pats performed the same function, as butter would probably have been made onsite from cream. 

 

9A413666-6184-41DB-A914-F9B8AA1255B4.thumb.jpeg.5dced13f384e3a2f6175d46516c8b4ca.jpeg

On the right of the picture you can see two large cones, which would have been of sugar. The black tongs beside them are sugar nips, and would have been used to ‘nip’ off a piece of sugar for cooking purposes. Granulated sugar or sugar lumps were not common until much later.

 

8A87E99C-B165-47AD-B688-9843CF9312C2.thumb.jpeg.a41d2587931b954c328ca6d4a17590a0.jpeg

Our guide asks me what these metal implements would have been used for and he is surprised when I give him the correct answer....curling tongs! None of your electric GHDs in those days!

 

79BC957D-91FA-41F8-9CEF-7E49AAD5979F.thumb.jpeg.b905094c348d3f27b4ea5bc5868f34b5.jpeg

 

A set of scales with weights.

 

D5B3C06A-1D7A-48AA-807B-6FC5F61E8268.thumb.jpeg.4313804ec82218fdefa6f29ac3dda713.jpeg

 

188C42E8-76A4-4CF3-B2DA-A481D2D95A0A.thumb.jpeg.82fa0a05cb071099885a214b7accaba4.jpeg

 

The cone shaped implement near the top of the photo, is of course, a candle snuffer.

 

I’m so pleased to have had the opportunity of exploring this house, especially seeing where Elizabeth Macquarie lived. Evidence of her existence is seen everywhere, and indeed our hotel is located on Macquarie St. 

 

She must have been an amazing, brave lady. She met her husband, 43, and a distant cousin, when she was just 26, and soon after their marriage he was appointed Governor of New South Wales. She, of course, followed him to the colony. He had been married before, and sadly his first wife died, but he made her a solemn promise to her never to marry in India or take a wife there.

 

Elizabeth was a great support to her husband, and despite ill health, she followed him on several arduous journeys, such as one to Tasmania. She showed herself to be, in her husband’s words,  ‘a most excellent, brave sailor.’

 

Imagine giving up what would have been a comfortable life in Scotland to sail halfway across the world, to an unknown continent with all its hardships, diseases and dangers, not to mention the long and uncomfortable 7 month sea voyage, with all its associated perils.

 

They had two children, a daughter, Jane, who sadly died in infancy, and a son, Lachlan.

 

By all accounts she took an interest in the welfare of women convicts and indigenous people, and was, of course, instrumental in the design of the Old Government House. She also worked with Elizabeth MacArthur to introduce hay making to NSW. She supported her husband in his efforts to change the penal colony into a thriving settler colony. 

 

She returned to Scotland with her husband in 1823, and continued to be a devoted wife. When she died at the age of 56, she was given a posthumous grant of land in New South Wales.

 

 

So ends our exploration of the ground floor of this amazing house. But now we can go upstairs to see an exhibition of ‘Women of Distinction.’

 

CE189DA0-5AB7-4A9B-B424-3AB832B46017.thumb.jpeg.f8127ec43c3d16efd1d861c440973c93.jpeg

 

 

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love seeing old houses that have some or all of the orginal furniture;  if not original, then good replica's.  Give me a chance to see what life was like back in those days. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, ellie1145 said:

Wow AF-1. That must be quite a story! 

 

Which president? 

 

OMG. is AF-1 short for Air Force 1??? 

I’m speechless (and that doesn’t happen often).

 

Did you get to see much of Canberra? I’m guessing it’s a pretty modern city? 

 

Id love to see more of Australia but guess that could be a long time coming. 

Ellie1145;  yes you are correct the initials in my name are exactly what you think.  I flew both President Bush 41, and Clinton. President Clinton went to Australia and New Zealand; and Bush just visited Australia.  We visited Sydney, Canberra, Port Douglas(for the great barrier reef visit), Melbourne, Aukland, Queenstown, and ChristChurch.  I also flew to Australia a lot back in the 70's.  Visited Woomera, Perth, Melbourne, Alice Springs, Sydney, Canberra. 

ps.  I was Chief Flight Attendant, served Reagan, Bush, and Clinton.  So to answer your question, (which I know you were going to ask), I have been to London many, many times with all three Presidents, and on vacation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, AF-1 said:

Ellie1145;  yes you are correct the initials in my name are exactly what you think.  I flew both President Bush 41, and Clinton. President Clinton went to Australia and New Zealand; and Bush just visited Australia.  We visited Sydney, Canberra, Port Douglas(for the great barrier reef visit), Melbourne, Aukland, Queenstown, and ChristChurch.  I also flew to Australia a lot back in the 70's.  Visited Woomera, Perth, Melbourne, Alice Springs, Sydney, Canberra. 

ps.  I was Chief Flight Attendant, served Reagan, Bush, and Clinton.  So to answer your question, (which I know you were going to ask), I have been to London many, many times with all three Presidents, and on vacation. 

Wow, my brother was a Navy Videographer (Combat Camera) and was assigned to White House Communications Agency during part of POTUS Clinton's term. I wonder if you two were on AF-1 at the same time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rmf11699;  well as Chief Flight Attendant on AF-1; I was on every trip unless I was sick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, AF-1 said:

I love seeing old houses that have some or all of the orginal furniture;  if not original, then good replica's.  Give me a chance to see what life was like back in those days. 

 

Me, too, AF-1. We love seeing the Flagler mansion in Florida, it’s another one that is fully furnished. We always try to visit it when we are in Florida. Not sure when we will ever return. 

 

Thank you so much for the fascinating article about the queen. I had no idea she’d been to California. I believe she got on well with President Reagan. He seemed a gentle giant of a man. He also got on well with our Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher.

 

 

 

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, AF-1 said:

Ellie1145;  yes you are correct the initials in my name are exactly what you think.  I flew both President Bush 41, and Clinton. President Clinton went to Australia and New Zealand; and Bush just visited Australia.  We visited Sydney, Canberra, Port Douglas(for the great barrier reef visit), Melbourne, Aukland, Queenstown, and ChristChurch.  I also flew to Australia a lot back in the 70's.  Visited Woomera, Perth, Melbourne, Alice Springs, Sydney, Canberra. 

ps.  I was Chief Flight Attendant, served Reagan, Bush, and Clinton.  So to answer your question, (which I know you were going to ask), I have been to London many, many times with all three Presidents, and on vacation. 

 

My goodness, you must have a lot of interesting tales to tell. Have you ever thought of writing a book about your experiences?  What an experience.

 

I have always had a soft spot for Ronald Reagan. Seemed a really lovely man. (Not that I know any of the politics of course). I always remember the photos of our lovely Princess Diana dancing so beautifully with John Travolta in that iconic gown at one of Ronald Reagan’s dinners. 

 

Thank you for telling us about your time as Chief Flight Attendant. Fascinating. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rmf11699 said:

Wow, my brother was a Navy Videographer (Combat Camera) and was assigned to White House Communications Agency during part of POTUS Clinton's term. I wonder if you two were on AF-1 at the same time?

 

Small world eh? How fascinating. 

 

(I’ve even managed to work out what POTUS means, too!👍)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, AF-1 said:

rmf11699;  well as Chief Flight Attendant on AF-1; I was on every trip unless I was sick.

AF-1, would you mind sharing your first name and I can ask my brother if he remembers you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Women of Distinction

 

E48C3EEC-CD55-4F25-BB68-6716F4A59775.thumb.jpeg.a9db136a217a2c320d3b9f75dc4e0294.jpeg

 

DIEU ET MON DROIT

 

We say goodbye to our guide and thank him for his most interesting tour.

 

Upstairs we find an exhibition called “Women of Distinction,’ which chronicles the women who lived or worked in the Old Government House. Some of these were well known, and some were unknown, and they include the wives of governors and their servants.

 

At the foot of the stairs there is a light box and a box of hats etc, and we are invited to use the accessories to make our own silhouette, but we don’t have time.

 

B6F4215D-3B0C-4943-8A17-733EC87C1230.thumb.jpeg.2ac6ca65f45518685aeabd90d8ad6707.jpeg

 

1EB03955-7E4E-40AB-B58D-6227AFC4B1DE.thumb.jpeg.8c063fbcff5f297c03d5e905e9e6cc69.jpeg

 

The Old Government House provided the backdrop for the governors’ wives to entertain and host dinners and afternoon teas, whilst their husbands carried out colonial business or entertained.

 

 

It became accommodation for junior boarders and their housemasters and matrons from the Kings School in 1910, and that continued until 1965.

 

The National Trust took the house over in 1967 and our own Queen Elizabeth II opened it as a museum in April 1970.

 

27E9AD1F-BBA6-4ABD-BF7F-8085339C4CA8.thumb.jpeg.2bb3e32599a489f60e8dabe9121d4de7.jpeg

 

There is more furniture to see, and portraits of many of these ladies.

 

ED9C812C-0DF1-415E-83AB-0634A83C9651.thumb.jpeg.c26b30a7f5847f346e34ee49555c894e.jpeg

 

20704222-F995-4085-A65D-EFA568A20DEF.thumb.jpeg.af51045de2d3e7bdece8b24fe2898d73.jpeg

 

D8C1B78A-E2A0-48B4-8BF1-63C5D1F3DADC.thumb.jpeg.42b0588bea77f2979d9ce3691bc555ce.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Women of Distinction

 

Elizabeth MacArthur

 

31F0C7A6-DC6D-445D-9D1B-40C863596A36.thumb.jpeg.b1385af0da7e934b455432d91e96025d.jpeg

One such woman of distinction was Elizabeth MacArthur, who married her husband in 1788 and sailed with him to Sydney in 1789. She was pregnant at the time but sadly went into premature labour on the ship and her baby daughter died.

 

She was the first educated woman to settle in the colony, and went on to have 4 sons and 3 daughters.  The family later lived in their property, Elizabeth Farm in Parramatta.

 

She loved living at the OGH and wrote.

 

“We enjoy one of the finest climates in the world. The necessaries of life are abundant, and a fruitful soil affords us many luxuries. Nothing induces me to wish for a change but the difficulty of educating our children.”

 

Emily Phillips

 

92D5B194-C5B7-4965-AA69-E52BF5FC6F7D.thumb.jpeg.6ddd789dfc1bf3d16276e17fd5c7ac8c.jpeg

Another fascinating story is that of Emily Phillips who had 11 children, three of whom died. When her husband died in England in 1847, she sold his business and emigrated to New South Wales. She took 8 of her children, plus her sister and brother-in-law, and settled in Parramatta. She opened a private school for girls. What a tough cookie she must have been, and how brave to have left the security of her home and travel to the other side of the world.

 

Mrs Anna King

Anna King married Philip Gidley King, the third governor, and established an orphanage. Her charitable work earned her the title of ‘Queen Josepha.’

 

Elizabeth Clarke

Elizabeth Clarke was convicted in England of stealing goods to the value of £60. She was sentenced to 7 years transportation to New South Wales. She was one of 97 female convicts who sailed on the vessel Speke. She became a servant at the OGH and later married and had three children

 

Mary Caroline Stewart

E69E1454-9EBC-420E-9419-1342895D0520.thumb.jpeg.32777886c564b59a0a5ab0c58e79ec1f.jpeg

Mary was the daughter of governor Sir Charles Augustus Fitzroy, and the wife of a naval Officer. She went on to have at least 9 children.

 

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We wander through the various rooms and see more furniture.

 

45C49D57-1E3A-4330-A811-C2121D2D84D2.thumb.jpeg.1b62684bec7aa80af5ad022359f21015.jpeg

 

45ADD4FA-2FFD-427F-81F5-8CFD8FA2C4F6.thumb.jpeg.d79cd50b53aea38e7ecb8dd6b32cc614.jpeg

 

F0789635-46A4-4832-BC0E-19D17A4731B0.thumb.jpeg.5e5c1e446e21698b764f6c64637ef9f4.jpeg

 

8193871A-D253-479B-8FC2-B68A4B833897.thumb.jpeg.aa753bd758a275b1cc35080aad26f62d.jpeg

 

253DEC42-D7A6-4E1F-832A-C97033A36F56.thumb.jpeg.6c3464391041bf2d36de86757830d3c0.jpeg

On the table are examples of children’s toys.

56B99372-3155-4203-8BEE-DD7A171F0F1A.thumb.jpeg.2a1ff695512c7fe08bfa370c50230a58.jpeg

 

80E5E520-2B49-484F-80D3-0CBA56C85CCA.thumb.jpeg.5619d9079f0abd538ba82c8fbd80b0e7.jpeg

 

16B38E0E-BCD0-4F74-9F6D-EB920542C059.thumb.jpeg.1d6b8f7996b3d3edda050d17ad2ee889.jpeg

 

A didgeridoo 

1F48F935-A070-4F12-848C-FA19FFADA398.thumb.jpeg.0b270a1f100058884550bf25bab3a0d7.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Back to Sydney

 

The tour is over, and we make our way back to the lockers to retrieve our bags.

 

We’ve had a wonderful time here at this National Trust property. We certainly count it as one of the best set up, and most interesting house we have visited. The Australian NT have done a superb job of restoring the house to its former glory. It is most atmospheric. 

 

2CC59D99-523B-423E-BBD7-6D5B2BDBE252.thumb.jpeg.eebe878fc899b1783951ca9a0b9cd1bc.jpeg

 

ED82F7BD-F29E-4174-A003-657E6461FF7F.thumb.jpeg.fdbe2ea6c7b8f0be739a84c2bb03ac48.jpeg

 

Then we walk back along the Main Street to the station where we catch a train back to Sydney, but this time we decide to get off at the top of the city so we can explore a little more.

 

We really like Parramatta, it seems a lovely place to visit. There are modern skyscrapers together with historic houses. It’s blisteringly hot but we enjoy our walk back to the station.

 

FB4EA480-DFD9-413D-8632-9C79B6015CC9.thumb.jpeg.05c44060eadb81b421f07de7f99e46c7.jpeg

 

82601F0F-95C1-4EAC-BCC0-A7144B2525C9.thumb.jpeg.6d43083722d2fab27a805d6dc9429357.jpeg

 

8AA3D45E-CC4C-47E6-89B0-35D31AB9EC97.thumb.jpeg.def3dabbc513f343354ef469a8da9d40.jpeg

We walk past the Western Sydney University Campus and walk past this beautiful statue.

75ADE533-095C-475B-9BF0-ACE2AE2A748F.thumb.jpeg.5c5065e593747c710253239913545404.jpeg

 

This lovely bronze statue Is of a local Parramatta boy who made good in a very big way.

 

The story behind this statue is that, as a boy in the 1830s, Sir James Martin walked 20km to Sydney to a prestigious school near Hyde Park each day.

 

He was the son of a servant who worked at the Old Government House. His thirst for knowledge was so great that he studied and eventually became a journalist, a barrister and a politician, becoming the Premier, and Chief Justice, of New South Wales.

 

123A26FF-9114-4608-BABE-37172256DECE.thumb.jpeg.c3a48c8b9f4cab146e493a98243538a1.jpeg

 

He came from humble beginnings, and when he was 18 months old his parents left County Cork in Ireland to sail to Australia.

 

His father took up the post of private groom to the Governor of NSW, Sir Thomas Brisbane, who preferred to live at the Old Government House, rather than in Sydney.

 

James and his family lived in a cottage on the estate, beside the stables. 

 

James showed great talent as a student, and when he was offered a place at one of Sydney’s finest schools, Cape Academy, his father was unable to find a job or lodgings in Sydney, so it seemed as if James would have to forgo this wonderful opportunity.

 

Instead he refused to let this stop him going, and insisted he would walk to school each day. 

 

From these humble beginning he built up a thriving law practice and entered politics, He married Isabella Long, the daughter of a wealthy wine merchant, and together they had eight sons and seven daughters.

 

B10DCA01-B94D-4F87-AB9D-34CF234CED4D.thumb.jpeg.90f79bb646766fd107379564c1bf93eb.jpeg

The square in Sydney’s CBD has been named Martin Place in his honour.

Edited by ellie1145

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning, all you Cruising Adventurers!

 

I hope you enjoyed our trip to Parramatta as much as we did, and that you are not suffering from history overload.

 

I’m afraid I’m really fascinated by how people lived in the past, and learning about this relatively young country and the brave people who settled there, is an endless source of pleasure. Their courage and fortitude, in the face of so many perils, is inspirational.

 

But the time is coming when we must leave this green and pleasant land and embark on our next and final adventure, our cruise to Fiji onboard the beautiful Majestic Princess. 

 

We just have a final look at Sydney city before we pack our suitcases and get ready to see our beautiful ship as she arrives in the morning.

 

So gird up your loins, walk with us through Sydney, back to the hotel, and then get yourselves ready to board Majestic Princess!

 

Are you excited? Are you actually still there?

 

(I’m sure many of you will be saying, ‘At Last!’) 🤣

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, ellie1145 said:

Good morning, all you Cruising Adventurers!

 

So gird up your loins, walk with us through Sydney, back to the hotel, and then get yourselves ready to board Majestic Princess!

 

Are you excited? Are you actually still there?

 

(I’m sure many of you will be saying, ‘At Last!’) 🤣

 

Still here Ellie! And so ready and excited to board Majestic Princess again! We have fixed our luggage tags to our suitcases and have all our cruise docs ready! Let's go!

 

Sandra

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...