Jump to content

Should you still arrive a day or two early?


Recommended Posts

When cruising resumes do you think it is still wise to arrive a day or two early or does that just increase your risk of contracting Covid in many of the departure cities?  Many of the departure cities have a large number of Covid cases.  Perhaps it's better just to go directly to the ship where the cruise lines will have procedures and policies to protect the passengers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The risks of traveling in at the last minute, like flight delays or traffic, don't magically go away because there is something else going on in the world.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to throw my two cents in, no matter if we cruise again or not, at some point we will.

It's always, always, ALWAYS, a good habit to arrive at port at least a day prior.

You never know what could happen if you arrive the day of.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, m8zenblue said:

Just to throw my two cents in, no matter if we cruise again or not, at some point we will.

It's always, always, ALWAYS, a good habit to arrive at port at least a day prior.

You never know what could happen if you arrive the day of.

Seems like it's more of an American thing though. I had this whole debate last year on this board regarding flying into Rome for our Suez Canal cruise and other European passengers on our cruise though it very odd that we would fly in a day or more earlier. European cruisers thought it was odd even if they were coming to Florida for a cruise. It seems for them they always fly in the same day as embarkation. I even had indignant responses when I explained that it's nice to tour what the embarkation city has to offer. I had more than one reply they have no interest in sightseeing at the embarkation point and other responses that American based airlines must not be very good if we can't trust the flight scheduling. I gave up on explaining the benefits.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, kwokpot said:

Seems like it's more of an American thing though. I had this whole debate last year on this board regarding flying into Rome for our Suez Canal cruise and other European passengers on our cruise though it very odd that we would fly in a day or more earlier. European cruisers thought it was odd even if they were coming to Florida for a cruise. It seems for them they always fly in the same day as embarkation. I even had indignant responses when I explained that it's nice to tour what the embarkation city has to offer. I had more than one reply they have no interest in sightseeing at the embarkation point and other responses that American based airlines must not be very good if we can't trust the flight scheduling. I gave up on explaining the benefits.

We always fly out a couple of days early and stay two or three days afterwards when flying to the states. Ok in summer it’s unlikely you would lose a day flying out but it does happen.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, yorky said:

We always fly out a couple of days early and stay two or three days afterwards when flying to the states. Ok in summer it’s unlikely you would lose a day flying out but it does happen.

That's good to know. It also seems many more people in the UK book their cruises as total packages from a tour company than in The States.That was pretty evident last year when Thomas Cook went bankrupt and the UK had to repatriate Thomas Cook customers stuck abroad. That's not GENERALLY how the majority of Americans book their holidays.

Edited by kwokpot
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, kwokpot said:

That's good to know. It also seems many more people in the UK book their cruises as total packages from a tour company than in The States.That was pretty evident last year when Thomas Cook went bankrupt and the UK had to repatriate Thomas Cook customers stuck abroad. That's not GENERALLY how the majority of Americans book their holidays.

Yes it’s still very popular to book a package over here especially the older generation who feel more secure doing it that way. Personally we book everything independently and have done for years, we find it always comes out cheaper. We also tend to use our air miles to book some of our hotels.

Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, kwokpot said:

Seems like it's more of an American thing though. I had this whole debate last year on this board regarding flying into Rome for our Suez Canal cruise and other European passengers on our cruise though it very odd that we would fly in a day or more earlier. European cruisers thought it was odd even if they were coming to Florida for a cruise. It seems for them they always fly in the same day as embarkation. I even had indignant responses when I explained that it's nice to tour what the embarkation city has to offer. I had more than one reply they have no interest in sightseeing at the embarkation point and other responses that American based airlines must not be very good if we can't trust the flight scheduling. I gave up on explaining the benefits.

You know its kinda funny, the first thought I had when I saw this was that the weather in Europe, in general, is much more stable than our weather in the US and Canada - between tornadoes and big thunderstorms 6-8 months out of year in my area and blizzards elsewhere in winter - we've learned the hard way that arriving a day early if possible is just one less thing to worry about. But, you know, I really don't know that. What is the rate of delays and cancelled flights in Europe, at least in the pre-Covid days? I remember being on a small bus tour in Scotland in early spring, and the driver pointed out some serious tree damage to some  large old oaks from a storm a few weeks earlier - looked like a tornado to me, and I've seen a few!

Edited by cangelmd
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, cangelmd said:

You know its kinda funny, the first thought I had when I saw this was that the weather in Europe, in general, is much more stable than our weather in the US and Canada - between tornadoes and big thunderstorms 6-8 months out of year in my area and blizzards elsewhere in winter - we've learned the hard way that arriving a day early if possible is just one less thing to worry about. But, you know, I really don't know that. What is the rate of delays and cancelled flights in Europe, at least in the pre-Covid days? I remember being on a small bus tour in Scotland in early spring, and the driver pointed out some serious tree damage to some  large old oaks from a storm a few weeks earlier - looked like a tornado to me, and I've seen a few!

 

The snag in the U.K. is we are not used to ‘serious’ weather so if we do have a bit more snow/wind/rain/leaf fall than usual it becomes a major event and services struggle to cope.

 

In addition to the weather remember U.K. and many European roads are small so a route that may be listed as 3 hours can be significantly more if there is heavy traffic, road works or an accident.

 

Also of concern are ‘lightening strikes’ not a weather but a people phenomenon where suddenly France or Italy or the U.K.  air space/rail lines stop working for a fixed period.

 

We travel independently worldwide and generally like a minimum of a two day buffer...Even when traveling from Southampton (a 4 hour drive away) we invariably go down the day before...with the cost of cruising so high why take risks?

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, cangelmd said:

You know its kinda funny, the first thought I had when I saw this was that the weather in Europe, in general, is much more stable than our weather in the US and Canada

Last June we flew into Amsterdam on the tail of a major storm that snapped or uprooted many of the trees along the canals. Most were cleared up quickly, but there were still some partially blocking the canals a couple of days later. Had we been flying in on embarkation day and the storm been a few hours later, we wouldn't have made the cruise. So it's not just North American weather.

 

DSC_0442.thumb.jpeg.884c103fadfd4223d4553943aa64df97.jpeg

 

On the question of airlines and their punctuality, for whatever reason, I looked at this a year or so ago and there wasn't a single North American airline in the top 15 other than Hawaiian Airlines, which placed #4. We will continue to stick with our arrivals a minimum of a day in advance.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We live in Estero (Fort Myers) FLorida.

We can drive to the port in 2 hours.

Even with the above we ALWAYS arrive in Fort Lauderdale or Miami the day before ship sails.

An accident on Alligator Alley could close the highway and result in arriving late to the port if we try to drive and day ship sails.

If fact we usually go 2 days early to help ease into cruise mood.

Drinking can start early!!! This helps me with attitude adjustment.

Isn't cruising wonderful.

Everyone stay safe.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good question!  We like to arrive a day early but seldom can due to work schedules.  Fortunately, we are a short, direct flight to MIA so traveling the day of embarkation has never been an issue in the past.  Post COVID, I would likely continue to fly in the day of embarkation to lessen the chances of exposure.  That always makes me a little nervous because anything can happen...like flight delays and lost luggage.  International flights are a whole different matter, of course.  I guess not being able to embark trumps all of that.  Maybe we will just drive...guess we can sort that out when cruising resumes.

Edited by Georgia_Peaches
Link to post
Share on other sites

One time,  we arrived in Seattle pre cruise and NONE of our luggage arrived, ( it was never loaded on the plane in NY)

 

  Luckily, we went a day early so there was time for the luggage to be located and sent out.    It arrived by Taxi in the middle of the night!  Whew,.otherwise we would have had to go speed shopping  the day of the cruise.,,

 

Now we pack alot of stuff in our carry  ons .just in case the nightmare strikes again!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t even risk the 4 hour drive to Galveston when we cruise from there. There’s no way I’d fly in the day of a cruise.

Besides, we enjoy getting in early, having a relaxing afternoon, and a nice dinner someplace. On Embarcation day we take care of any last minute detail and arrive at the ship ready for our vacation. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Seems like it's more of an American thing though. I had this whole debate last year on this board regarding flying into Rome for our Suez Canal cruise and other European passengers on our cruise though it very odd that we would fly in a day or more earlier. European cruisers thought it was odd even if they were coming to Florida for a cruise. It seems for them they always fly in the same day as embarkation. I even had indignant responses when I explained that it's nice to tour what the embarkation city has to offer. I had more than one reply they have no interest in sightseeing at the embarkation point and other responses that American based airlines must not be very good if we can't trust the flight scheduling. I gave up on explaining the benefits.

We are from the UK and we always arrive a day , sometimes days early whether we are catching a plane, train , ship or automobile!! Its part of our holiday

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most folks we have met on cruises arrive at the port at least 24 hours ahead of embarking.    Many reasons for this including catching up from jet lag, ensuring you have your suitcases and being able to arrive onboard without stress.   Traveling with masks will keep those of us who are healthy safe.   It is certainly unwise to travel now if you are overweight, diabetic, have lung problems, have compromised immune systems, high blood pressure, kidney problems or heart disease.   In the next year travel may only be for the truly healthy amount us.    Anyone with a concern about traveling should stay home.    Florida get you act together, enough of this spread!

Link to post
Share on other sites

My port is a two or three hour drive, still prefer to go down a day before and stay the night. I have seen too many delays on the freeway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We always fly in a day or two ahead also.  There's something very magical about having arrived in the port city and relaxing, knowing you are boarding a cruise ship the next day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its always better to arrive early. When we travel, we always manage to arrive early before boarding (or excursions) in order to relax after a drive or a flight. walk around the city, just chill and relax. Its always better to start your trip refreshed and with an eager mood 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with most of you, it's always better to arrive a couple of days early.   But is it worth the risk?   Is it more of a risk to miss the ship or to contract the virus in one of the departure cities.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow.  delete-arama here.

 

Reposting here:  Anyway, always, and I mean always, arrive at least a day early.  A hell of a lot less stress.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • Q&A with Chris Prelog, President of Windstar Cruises!
      • Register Now for Cruise Critic Live Special Event: Royal Caribbean
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...