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If Royal Requires A Covid-19 Vaccine Before Cruising Will You Get It???


If Royal Requires A Covid-19 Vaccine Before Cruising Will You Get It???  

1,014 members have voted

  1. 1. If Royal Requires A Covid-19 Vaccine Before Cruising Will You Get It So You Can Cruise Again?

    • YES
      795
    • NO
      220


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3 minutes ago, loman said:

Well  you said ... if people dont get a flu shot  their time is coming.

Wishing a sickness on someone is ... pretty arrogant .

Seriously? That's not arrogant, that's reality.  If you haven't had the flu, eventually you will.  I don't know anyone who hasn't ever had the flu at some point in their life.  Do you?

 

Arrogant is saying "I've never".

Edited by BND
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18 minutes ago, BND said:

Seriously? That's not arrogant, that's reality.  If you haven't had the flu, eventually you will.  I don't know anyone who hasn't ever had the flu at some point in their life.  Do you?

 

Arrogant is saying "I've never".

I dont poll people to find out their ailments ,  im just not that interested .

 

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I am going to get one anyway, but I will be even more inclined to get the vaccine, at least the Oxford/AstraZeneca one, if Oxford can get around the ethical issues and is allowed to proceed with their challenge trial.


And it looks like those hurdles are being overcome and they are good to go on the trial. The tens of thousands who have already volunteered for the challenge trial are true heroes!

 

 

Edited by cured
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On 7/21/2020 at 6:13 PM, RETNAVY1996 said:

I voted no because I will wait until we really know the vaccine is safe.  This fast track stuff worries me about other things the cure could cause.   Give it a few years and I will get one, but even then we will not know of any long term issues.  
 

Thank goodness there are volunteers who agree to receive the vaccine in trials. Without them, there will be no vaccine for anyone.

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I will definitely get the vaccine as soon as it is available to me.  Middle DD and I have signed up to volunteer for testing vaccine.

It's important to us since her DH is cancer survivor with reduced immunity and my youngest DD has an autoimmune disorder which causes blood clotting.  It's worth taking the risk so that they can have hopes of a living a "normal" life instead of limited contacts. A welcomed side effect would be the ability to cruise again🤩

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On 7/22/2020 at 7:56 AM, PhillyFan33579 said:


Keep in mind no vaccine currently being developed is going to eliminate the possibility of getting COVID-19. 

I would hope getting the vaccine will lessen the effects and duration of the virus. Better yet, hope the  vaccine will eliminate any symptoms and after effects. Even better would be that the vaccinated person would not be contagious by keeping the viral load very low. I will take any of those outcomes with the vaccine.

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On 8/5/2020 at 9:15 PM, sea shepherd said:

It will take me a few years after seeing how people are responding to these vaccines.  I am in no hurry to do anything right now. 

Covid may get you by then. I guess you are willing to take your chances?

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1 hour ago, coffeebean said:

Thank goodness there are volunteers who agree to receive the vaccine in trials. Without them, there will be no vaccine for anyone.

I agree. And it takes a special volunteer to sign up for the additional challenge trials. Most of the trials happening right now are double blind where the half receive the placebo and half receive the vaccine and then sent on their way to live their normal life. However, with mask wearing and other protective measures, there is still some question whether the vaccinated person was ever exposed to Covid-19.

 

This is oversimplified, but Oxford's challenge trial is taking a smaller group and everyone gets the vaccine.  Then after a certain amount of time, everyone inhales a measured amount of the corona virus so that there is no doubt the volunteers were exposed.  Then they can really see the effectiveness of the vaccine.

 

There are ethical questions about deliberately exposing healthy people to a known disease that has no treatment or cure.  But this is a global pandemic, a war against a debilitating virus, and the volunteers are fully informed. So it seems like the challenge trial is a go. 

 

Those volunteers are definitely risking their lives to save the rest of us! And I would feel quite safe taking this extensively tested vaccine. 

Edited by cured
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1 hour ago, coffeebean said:

I would hope getting the vaccine will lessen the effects and duration of the virus. Better yet, hope the  vaccine will eliminate any symptoms and after effects. Even better would be that the vaccinated person would not be contagious by keeping the viral load very low. I will take any of those outcomes with the vaccine.

Agree with your post.  Good points.  

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20 hours ago, Mallefiscent said:

 

Someone already gave an example of a vaccine that went bad. The dangers of thalidomide are more well known than the dangers of vaccines.  If you cannot see that these are examples that medicine doesn't always know what it is doing and that fact gives people pause to just blindly follow it, then I don't know what to tell you.  There are plenty of examples out there.  Do a little research.  If you still choose to get the vaccine, that is your choice.  If people choose to wait and see if any significant events happen from a possible vaccine, that is their choice too.   I can see both points of view.  Apparently a lot of people on here are incapable of that. 

You can't compare thalidomide with the testing process of a vaccine.

 

First of all, thalidomide was only tested on animals. It was never tested on whether it could cause birth defects. 

 

Also, in the 60's there was not the knowledge of today of what could hurt a fetus. There were little if no regulations on medications that could be given to pregnant people.

 

70 years later, knowledge is much better, and testing protocols are much more advanced, for instance 3 phased trials to test for safety and efficacy.

 

If you want to compare thalidomide to something, it would be closer to using hydroxycloroquine off brand without any kind of testing to treat covid-19.

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23 minutes ago, Lady Chew said:

The poster was not comparing thalidomide to a vaccine, but was using it as an example of medicine gone wrong.

and has mentioned by others above, you cannot compare the use of a medicine going wrong to the current process of vetting a vaccine.  Apples to Oranges.

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3 hours ago, coffeebean said:

I would hope getting the vaccine will lessen the effects and duration of the virus. Better yet, hope the  vaccine will eliminate any symptoms and after effects. Even better would be that the vaccinated person would not be contagious by keeping the viral load very low. I will take any of those outcomes with the vaccine.

That's the expectation.  So, instead of getting really sick, you might just have cold symptoms.  That is what was explained this morning on the news by a Dr who was discussing this very thing.  And, in that situation the person infected probably wouldn't be as contagious.  Like when I had the flu earlier this year (wasn't tested but two days before were with two people, one who tested positive for type A and one for type B) and because I get the vaccine every year I had a very mild case.  They both had gotten the vaccine this year and a few years previous, but obviously I had either had this type in the past or had had a vaccine against it and still had some immunity as I've been getting the shot for over 20 years.  I had a 100 deg temp and they both had 102, I had a mild cough, a runny nose and was sick for 3 days and had no body aches.  They both had full blown flu symptoms for a week.

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7 hours ago, johnjen said:

Another comment: Whenever a vaccine becomes available, I think we will wait at least two months just to see how people are reacting to it. If adversely, we will hold off until it gets fixed.

What do you think the current trials are doing?  They are testing people currently and starting the trials where they actually expose people to the virus to see how they react.  That will take a couple of months.  They are at the point they aren't just testing young healthy people.  

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When this whole Covid event started it really caught my attention now that I have entered the retirement phase of  my life        ( I was able to retire at an early age).

 

I have worked in the medical field since 1977 and retired at my last position of being a Nurse Anesthetist for over 30 years.

 

I have seen many changes in health care.

 

So many advances to save lives.

 

So many preventative measures to prolong life.

 

Some  still shed no hope for life ending diseases, but medical breakthroughs have delayed death.

 

Could it be my age that has made me more receptive to being able to enjoy this phase of my life?

 

When a tested vaccine to boost antibodies is made available to lessen the chance of acquiring a disease, I will get it.

 

Over the years I have gotten the hepatitis vaccine, Pneumovax, boosters on all my DTP and soon to get the Shingles vaccine.

 

Now this being yet another vaccine, and yes, I am not aware of any long term undesirable effects, no one will til the long term gets here.

 

But even though I am retired, my husband is front line in caring for COVID patients and I hear his frustration.  And that is enough to hope for a vaccine to lessen the seriousness of this plague that some get so sick with.

 

I do not know what the correct answer is, but the answer for me is when the vaccine is made available, I will get it.

 

Not so much to just cruise, but moreover to avoid this illness.

 

Thanks for letting me ramble.

 

 

Stay healthy

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You can't compare thalidomide with the testing process of a vaccine.
 
First of all, thalidomide was only tested on animals. It was never tested on whether it could cause birth defects. 
 
Also, in the 60's there was not the knowledge of today of what could hurt a fetus. There were little if no regulations on medications that could be given to pregnant people.
 


All true. And Thalidomide is back in use today and considered a very safe and effective medicine. Just not to be taken during pregnancy. A lot has been learned since the 60’s about testing medications.


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On 8/6/2020 at 10:08 PM, time4u2go said:

You have to take a covid test to buy an airplane ticket?

The airline I work for requires a recent negative PCR covid-19 test before acceptance on a flight, and another for return.  Private clinics are charging between £120 and £150 per test. 

Edited by sgmn
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I found an interesting article this morning, and this part is what I've been wondering about since February when I got off the Majesty with pneumonia.  I may find out much later if it was COVID19, but if it was I wondered why I didn't have a much worse time with it.  I had been told by health providers in the past that viral illnesses combined with vaccines do help to build immunities against future viruses.  This was explained as the "base" virus might have mutated, but the antibodies from having the virus previously, plus vaccines, helps a person have a milder case of the mutated version.  That's one of the reasons I've been getting vaccines for everything recommended :

 

"When we looked in the setting of Covid disease, we found that people who had prior vaccinations with a variety of vaccines -- for pneumococcus, influenza, hepatitis and others -- appeared to have a lower risk of getting Covid disease," Dr. Andrew Badley, an infectious disease specialist at Mayo Clinic told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday night.
It's what immunologists call immune training: how your immune system creates an effective response to fight off infections, Badley says.
"A good analogy is to think of your immune system as being a muscle," he said. "The more you exercise that muscle, the stronger it will be when you need it."
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I’m about as pro vaccine as they get. I suspect our ancestors would think we are nuts for rejecting life saving medicine. That said, once we have a vaccine it’s going to take 3-6 months to vaccinate everyone who is willing.  I’ll be at the front of the line. But if somebody wants to be at the back of the line for some extra caution, I totally understand. 

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Thousands of people will never get this virus, just like thousands have never had the flu (knock on wood), or any other major illnesses.  As a healthy individual who isn’t overweight, doesn’t smoke, moderate drinker, and does very little public socializing, I don’t worry to much about getting sick. Will I get the vaccine? Probably after it’s been out a while and there is proof it works. I’ve been cruising for 40 years, so if I can’t cruise, it’s really not a big deal to me.

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