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What will cruising look and feel like post-COVID?


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With NCL/RCCL combining forces by putting together a very impressive panel of experts to help craft policy for the potential resumption of cruising during (more likely after) COVID, I am curious to know what innovative changes people may believe are in store for Celebrity/cruising.

 

If I had to guess, I'd say ships will be sailing at reduced capacity initially, along with some kind of face covering requirement. I also wouldn't be surprised if cruise lines take a Hawaii approach, and require proof of a negative COVID test within 72 hrs of sailing, though I think this would be hard to implement. Ideally, they can source the rapid COVID breath tests that are in testing now that can provide results in just a few seconds, and just test at the terminal;  I don't really see any other way to massively screen people in a rapid manner.

 

Do you think cruise lines will invest in more sophisticated HVAC systems to better filter air on the ships? Electrostatic sprayers to protect surfaces from viruses for up to 30 days?

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There are dozens of current threads that address your questions. While waiting for replies, there's lots of information for you to  to go through. The bottom line, however, is that all of it is guesswork at this point, as no one has concrete answers.

 

Happy reading.

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I see elevators being a problem.  I was at a resort hotel in Fla a couple of weeks ago and one of the social distance requirements was no more than 2 people could ride at a time.  Families, of course were allowed.  This hotel had only 2 elevators, 5 floors and I'm guessing less than 200 guests.  Riding the elevator was an adventure.

 

On a ship with 16 elevators and 3,000 passengers and maybe 15 decks will be far more challenging.Add to that the average age difference in my example.  Not sure exactly what the ave age on a ship would be but far older than the ave age at this Reddington Beach hotel.   This means more walkers and scooters and fewer stair climbers.

 

I can't picture how this issue gets addressed.

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51 minutes ago, Edinburghgirl1 said:

this is what Costa (Carnival Group) are proposing.

 

http://www.sailcosta.com/8115_Safety/8115.03_FAQs.pdf

 

i would think most cruise lines will adopt similar practices. 

Very interesting! About what I would expect; seems to me that RCCL will have the buffet open in some capacity, however.  It'll be interesting to see how Europe handles it first. Should be a good indicator of what works here in the US and elsewhere as cruising returns. Surprised they aren't requiring face coverings outside, but I suppose they figure people will know not to congregate near one another.

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7 hours ago, frankdp said:

I see elevators being a problem.  I was at a resort hotel in Fla a couple of weeks ago and one of the social distance requirements was no more than 2 people could ride at a time.  Families, of course were allowed.  This hotel had only 2 elevators, 5 floors and I'm guessing less than 200 guests.  Riding the elevator was an adventure.

 

On a ship with 16 elevators and 3,000 passengers and maybe 15 decks will be far more challenging.Add to that the average age difference in my example.  Not sure exactly what the ave age on a ship would be but far older than the ave age at this Reddington Beach hotel.   This means more walkers and scooters and fewer stair climbers.

 

I can't picture how this issue gets addressed.

Very good point. My guess is reduced capacity will address this somewhat; I would also imagine that they would need to figure out a way to more efficiently and precisely stagger dining/entertainment to prevent any kind of 'rushes.' Even then, it's hard to imagine limiting elevator capacity considering how essential they are. Overall, I really don't see the appeal in cruising until after a vaccine is distributed, but there could be some incredibly innovative solutions we haven't thought of that are being worked on. I really doubt it, though.

 

Hard to justify dropping thousands of dollars on a half-baked vacation experience, at least for now.

Edited by Ben100014
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If I take your question at face value then post-COVID (in my mind anyway) means no COVID.  There is a vaccine and/or the virus has disappeared worldwide to a point where cruising is safe.  In that scenario we would not need masks or reduced ship capacities.  Back to normal cruising hopefully.  If you mean instead limited cruising with COVID still lurking about, then plenty of threads are speculating on this.  I am not.  I just will not cruise again until COVID has been conquered.  Best bet is a vaccine or very effective drug.

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I actually like the idea of a Negative Covid-19 test 48 hours prior to boarding as a requirement, as well as flu vaccine and if there is one a Covid vaccine (instead of Negative testing).  It's not difficult to implement.   I'm a nurse who teaches, and my students must have a negative Covid-19 test 48 hours prior to clinical, (as well as negative TB and a flu vaccine), and they easily obtain what they need.  It's a choice, get the required shots and tests, or don't go.  

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It is taking weeks to get test results back for the same reason it is taking months to get back refunds back from Celebrity. Demand outstripping capacity to respond. I know that there is a rapid test either just starting up or under development...but it takes time to produce...especially if components need to be produced as well. I don’t think we will be going anywhere until such a rapid test is readily available and is as simple as a pregnancy test to administer...and it has to be accurate...not just close. So between a truly rapid test and a vaccine and a therapy that is effective and easy for ships medical team to administer (vs say ventilator)....it could be a very long time before cruising is “fun”

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On 7/23/2020 at 3:57 PM, Fouremco said:

There are dozens of current threads that address your questions. While waiting for replies, there's lots of information for you to  to go through. The bottom line, however, is that all of it is guesswork at this point, as no one has concrete answers.

 

Happy reading.

Excellent point mon amie ( my friend ). I've read the "same old, same old " for weeks and have become  "weak "  reading it.

Can't we discuss Gratuities , Buffets , Chair Hogs , or What does the Guest Relations Manager do other than reply " Sorry 'bout that "  to everything a " Customer "  complains about ? 

 

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On 7/24/2020 at 2:03 AM, Ben100014 said:

 

 

Hard to justify dropping thousands of dollars on a half-baked vacation experience, at least for now.

Exactly.  We've shifted everything and our next cruise is October 2021.  Not even optimistic that it will be an experience we're interested in then.  Time will tell.

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56 minutes ago, Pinboy said:

Excellent point mon amie ( my friend ). I've read the "same old, same old " for weeks and have become  "weak "  reading it.

Can't we discuss Gratuities , Buffets , Chair Hogs , or What does the Guest Relations Manager do other than reply " Sorry 'bout that "  to everything a " Customer "  complains about ? 

 

Oooooh, a teachable moment!  "Mon amie" refers to a female friend.  A male friend would be "mon ami".

 

At least we have the Mein Schiff 2 sailing to bring back a bit of positivity to CC and the cruise world generally. It also serves to show some of the adjustments that we may face once other lines are prepared to sail.

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On 7/24/2020 at 10:12 AM, Wine-O said:

You can't get a COVID-19 test 48 hours prior to anything.  It's been taking up to a week for results to come back.  🍷

Maybe where you live. My wife had a small medical test last week. It required a Covid 19 test beforehand. She had results in about 36 hours. 

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Just now, ORV said:

Maybe where you live. My wife had a small medical test last week. It required a Covid 19 test beforehand. She had results in about 36 hours. 

DW and I were both tested this past Saturday after she suffered a high fever that came on very suddenly. She had her result in a few minutes over 26 hours while mine took a little bit longer at 37 hours;  I'd displayed no symptoms and was not considered a priority. Both were negative and both well under 48 hours.

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23 minutes ago, ORV said:

Maybe where you live. My wife had a small medical test last week. It required a Covid 19 test beforehand. She had results in about 36 hours. 

In many (but not all) states in the US one can get a COVID-19 nasal swab (PCR) test at CVS Minute Clinics.  Results within 48 hours I believe.  Or at a state-run or county-run testing site (typically not rapid turn-around).  Also if your state has LabCorp (some are now in Walgreens) you can get a COVID-19 Antibody test with results in 24 hours for $10.  The swab test is better for knowing if you are infected currently.  The antibody test is limited in that it might take up to two weeks for COVID antibodies to develop after infection.  So it is better if you just want to see if you previously were infected (in last 1-4 months).

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A Covid test 48 hours before you board doesn’t mean you don’t have the virus. Also doesn’t mean you won’t pick up the virus in port, in embarkation city, or traveling to the port. Has some value but it’s so limited not sure it will be implemented. The problem isn’t whether the cruise will let you on. But what happens when you embark from Tampa on Saturday, want to get off at st Martin on Monday, jamaica on Tuesday, and the Bahamas on Thursday, and they all require a test 48 hours ahead. Are you going to get testing every day throughout the cruise? That’s unreasonable.

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1 hour ago, sanger727 said:

But what happens when you embark from Tampa on Saturday,......

Simple. Cruises just won't be happening under those conditions. As long as those restrictions exist, ships just won't be able to dock there. Or even sail (from a US port) in the first place

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8 hours ago, TeeRick said:

In many (but not all) states in the US one can get a COVID-19 nasal swab (PCR) test at CVS Minute Clinics.  Results within 48 hours I believe.  Or at a state-run or county-run testing site (typically not rapid turn-around).  Also if your state has LabCorp (some are now in Walgreens) you can get a COVID-19 Antibody test with results in 24 hours for $10.  The swab test is better for knowing if you are infected currently.  The antibody test is limited in that it might take up to two weeks for COVID antibodies to develop after infection.  So it is better if you just want to see if you previously were infected (in last 1-4 months).

 

@TeeRick - I stumbled into this thread by accident and glad to have read your post. I'm likely not going to need a test any time soon because my company sent most office based employees home on 12 March 2020 to work. We are not likely returning to the office in 2020. I will check out my local pharmacy chains (some of the ones you mentioned are in my area) to see what are the test timeframes. Thank you!

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On 7/24/2020 at 8:20 AM, TeeRick said:

If I take your question at face value then post-COVID (in my mind anyway) means no COVID.  There is a vaccine and/or the virus has disappeared worldwide to a point where cruising is safe.  In that scenario we would not need masks or reduced ship capacities.  Back to normal cruising hopefully.  If you mean instead limited cruising with COVID still lurking about, then plenty of threads are speculating on this.  I am not.  I just will not cruise again until COVID has been conquered.  Best bet is a vaccine or very effective drug.

 

MY guess, and of course that's all it is, is that all cruise lines will require all passengers to have been vaccinated. As far as I'm concerned, this is no different than requiring specific inoculations to visit a specific foreign country.  And believe me, I know many people will rail against this (I'm fully expecting more than a few nasty comments to my post), but IMO it's all about public safety.

 

Regardless, once we're allowed to cruise again and my wife and I can do so safely, we'll be on board!

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On 7/24/2020 at 2:03 AM, Ben100014 said:

Very good point. My guess is reduced capacity will address this somewhat; I would also imagine that they would need to figure out a way to more efficiently and precisely stagger dining/entertainment to prevent any kind of 'rushes.' Even then, it's hard to imagine limiting elevator capacity considering how essential they are. Overall, I really don't see the appeal in cruising until after a vaccine is distributed, but there could be some incredibly innovative solutions we haven't thought of that are being worked on. I really doubt it, though.

 

Hard to justify dropping thousands of dollars on a half-baked vacation experience, at least for now.

Agree. This is the essential dilemma.   How is this enjoyable?  

 

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On 7/29/2020 at 8:56 AM, TeeRick said:

In many (but not all) states in the US one can get a COVID-19 nasal swab (PCR) test at CVS Minute Clinics.  Results within 48 hours I believe.  Or at a state-run or county-run testing site (typically not rapid turn-around).  Also if your state has LabCorp (some are now in Walgreens) you can get a COVID-19 Antibody test with results in 24 hours for $10.  The swab test is better for knowing if you are infected currently.  The antibody test is limited in that it might take up to two weeks for COVID antibodies to develop after infection.  So it is better if you just want to see if you previously were infected (in last 1-4 months).

 

Testing in the US is currently hit-or-miss, and it is because the demand is far outstripping the supply.  It mostly depends if the lab that your sample gets sent to was allocated enough reagents or not.  Not many labs are turning down tests, so instead they pile up and get done at a FIFO basis, so sometimes you can have a turn around of 24 hours, and some busy places have like 7+ day turn around, which also destroys sensitivity of the assay since the RNA you are testing for is pretty fragile.

 

"The average time to receive results is now more than two days for top priority patients, which include hospital patients, some pre-operative patients and symptomatic health-care workers, Quest Diagnostics said late Monday. The company added that for all others, testing turnaround time is more than seven days."

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/07/28/bill-gates-says-delays-in-coronavirus-test-results-make-them-a-complete-waste-insane.html

 

I believe CVS uses Quest.

 

 

Edited by UnorigionalName
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