Jump to content

MSC Starts Back Aug 16 - Good or Bad?


Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, resistk said:

All they did was lose money.  It was done for other reasons perhaps to show viability.

They did more than lose money. They gave some hope by showing viability.

 

No one says that even with those measures the Virus is not going to strike again. Even now, they have started the second cruise with the Grandiosa under similar circumstances. There is a lot to learn from their efforts.

 

Ivi

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, resistk said:

All they did was lose money.  It was done for other reasons perhaps to show viability.

 

What does "lose money" mean?

Is MSC “losing” additional money by resuming operations rather than remaining on standby?  Right now, they are paying standby expenses and not recovering any of their sunk costs. 

Clearly, there will be one-time startup costs to reposition and prep a ship.  If their voyage-related variable operating costs (sales commissions, utilities, fuel, staff, supplies, port charges, etc) are higher than their voyages’ revenue, then they are “losing more money”.   If the their voyages' expenses are covered, then money is available to cover one-time startup and standby costs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Glass half full

Good news -- it is possible to cruise and not get sick or spread the virus throughout the ship.

Bad news -- the restrictions imposed (which I do not blame them for imposing) are not likely to attract most of us to return to cruising.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, bitob said:

Glass half full

Good news -- it is possible to cruise and not get sick or spread the virus throughout the ship.

Bad news -- the restrictions imposed (which I do not blame them for imposing) are not likely to attract most of us to return to cruising.

 

 

 

Other Bad News is due to the length of the incubation period they won't be able to say definitively that no on contracted the virus on that cruise for another week!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Roland4 said:

 

Other Bad News is due to the length of the incubation period they won't be able to say definitively that no on contracted the virus on that cruise for another week!

Yes, and unfortunately since no one is going in quarantine after the cruises, it is not accurate to say that, who ever turns out to be positive, got the disease during the cruise. Many people, who have made up their minds about not cruising will say for sure it was during the cruise, but actually it could be after it. For example on the train home, which at the moment appear to be more risky than the MSC Grandiosa.

 

Not easy at all...
 

Ivi
 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.cruiseindustrynews.com/cruise-news/23417-msc-forced-to-delay-msc-magnifica-program.html

MSC Cruises announced today it will postpone the restart of MSC Magnifica until September 26, 2020 despite just having completed a first successful cruise with the MSC Grandiosa.

MSC cited the recent introduction of additional testing measures for residents of Italy having traveled to Greece.

"We are seeing cancellations and a softening in demand since the ship’s itinerary includes as many as three ports in that country. This has led to the decision to delay the restart of the ship by four weeks," the company said.

MSC added that it believes that reservations will start to pick up again in the coming weeks due to the appeal of the itinerary.

MSC Magnifica’s sales are open to residents of the Schengen area, at the same time in this early phase of restart the majority of guests are expected to be Italian nationals and residents.

As a result, MSC Magnifica cruise departures from August 29 to September 19 have been cancelled. The first cruise will depart from Bari, Italy with an unchanged itinerary on September 26.

The MSC Grandiosa is currently offering seven-night cruises with embarkation in the Italian ports of Genoa, Civitavecchia, Naples and Palermo and also calling at Valletta, Malta.

Link to post
Share on other sites

More news on MSC Grandiosa from cruise news. This is already the second cruise under the new Health protocols:

 

“MSC Cruises' host of new health and safety protocols are already working, as the cruise line has denied boarding to a group of guests following COVID-19 testing, according to a statement.

The Grandiosa was back in Genoa for her turnaround call on Sunday, and while MSC disinfected the ship, guests in the terminal underwent testing. 

MSC said that during embarkation, a young man tested positive for both an antigen test and a second molecular level test. As a result, MSC denied boarding to both the young ma his family, 15 people in total who had traveled to Genoa for the cruise by van.

In addition, last Saturday while the ship was on her way back to Genoa from Valletta, all guests who went ashore in Malta took the mandatory testing required by the Italian authorities prior to re-entering Italy. All tested negative.

"Other than that, life on board during the first and the early phases of the next cruise ran smoothly, with guests enjoying every bit of the specialty restaurants, cafés and shops that our flagship has to offer. Similarly, many of the shore excursions on offer – we call them protected ashore visits, were sold out," MSC said, in a statement. 

Edited by travelberlin
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

My TA - he is not selling MSC - heard  some guests were sent away because they left the  "organised tours " and were walking to terraces ashore for drinks 

i do not know if it is true -

but are those the future cruises on mega ships ?

tours or staying on board ? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, vistaman said:

but are those the future cruises on mega ships ?

tours or staying on board ? 

 

Should be great for those three and four day "booze cruises".  (Where is the Big Red Boat when we need it.)

 

Buy that Carnival stock!!!

Edited by FlyerTalker
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://thepointsguy.com/news/msc-cruises-ship-grandiosa-covid-free/

 

Has MSC Cruises cracked the code for a safe return of cruising?

 

Just a few months ago, with COVID-19 raging, it seemed like the shutdown of cruising might go on forever — or at least until the world had developed widespread immunity to the illness.

But in recent weeks, something big has happened that has raised the possibility that cruising might be able to come back in a significant way much sooner than some people think.

One of the world’s biggest cruise ships, the 4,842-passenger MSC Grandiosa, has resumed sailing with paying passengers in the Mediterranean, stopping at ports in Italy and Malta, without recording a single case of COVID-19 on board.

 

“It’s working, and our protocol is doing what it’s meant to do,” one of the top MSC Cruises executives in North America, Ken Muskat, told The Points Guy on Friday in an exclusive interview. “There are no reported cases (of COVID-19), no issues on board, and guest satisfaction is high.”

In what is turning into something of a test case for the entire cruise industry, MSC Grandiosa resumed operations on Aug. 16 out of the port of Genoa, Italy, with two big innovations that some industry watchers think could be the key to keeping the new coronavirus off ships: A requirement that all passengers test negative for COVID-19 in the moments before boarding, and a rule that passengers can only leave the ship in ports when on a cruise-line organized shore excursion.

The supervised tours, which are taking place in such ports as Naples and Palermo, Italy, are carefully designed for social distancing and led by guides who have tested negative for the illness. Buses used for the tours are regularly sanitized.

“We’ve created sort of this bubble,” said Muskat, who is EVP and chief operating officer at MSC Cruises USA, the U.S.-arm of Switzerland-based MSC Cruises.

The idea, he suggested, was to give the new coronavirus no way to sneak on board.

 

MSC Grandiosa wasn’t the first cruise ship around the world to resume service. Since late June, several small- to medium-size oceangoing vessels have restarted a small number of sailings out of ports in Germany, Norway and a handful of other countries. Quite a few small river ships in Europe also have resumed sailings. But none of the vessels have been of the size or significance of MSC Grandiosa — the world’s seventh-biggest cruise ship.

Loaded with restaurants, bars, showrooms and deck-top attractions, including a giant waterpark, MSC Grandiosa represents the sort of megaship cruising that is favored by large swaths of the cruising public. Along with Royal Caribbean, Norwegian Cruise Line, Carnival Cruise Line and Princess Cruises, MSC Cruises dominates the world of big-ship cruising.

 

In addition to being the only line to relaunch a megaship in this new age of coronavirus, MSC Cruises has been the most aggressive about creating a coronavirus-free bubble on its ships.

That’s significant, as several of the lines that have restarted trips already have run into trouble.

One of the first cruise ships to resume operations since the industry shut down, Hurtigruten’s 535-passenger Roald Amundsen, experienced a major outbreak of COVID-19 in late July, within days of restarting service. Dozens of crew and passengers became ill, with more than a half-dozen requiring hospitalization. The line ended up canceling all sailings until further notice.

Three other small vessels that restarted service in July also have had to cancel voyages after a single passenger on each ship received positive test results midway during a sailing. One of the lines, UnCruise Adventures, subsequently canceled all trips for the rest of the year.

None of the lines that experienced COVID-19 scares, however, were testing passengers for the illness as they arrived at the pier.

“That was a critical decision,” Muskat said of the testing at the cruise terminal, which was a major commitment from the line.

Already, the testing has kept one passenger with COVID-19 off MSC Grandiosa. A passenger tested positive during the check-in process for the ship’s second sailing out of Genoa, Italy, on Aug. 23. He was sent home along with his family and several other people who had shared a van transfer to the ship. There were 15 passengers in all who were not allowed to board.

 

“Of course, we’re not happy about turning people away. But in this environment, you don’t want to risk (the health of) a few thousand people who are on board the ship,” Muskat said.

Muskat said MSC Cruises started planning for the pre-cruise testing months in advance by lining up testing equipment and materials. The testing itself is a major logistical operation, and an expensive undertaking, he said. While MSC Grandiosa is sailing at a reduced capacity to allow for social distancing, there still are a couple of thousand passengers a week boarding the vessel in various ports who need to be tested as quickly as possible as they arrive.

The restriction on passengers leaving the ship in ports — passengers can’t just walk off vessels on their own; they have to be on an organized tour — comes with its own challenges. But Muskat said the port restriction also is a key element of the line’s comeback plan.

It’s “all part of that bubble experience making sure we are controlling the exposure that our guests have and that everybody is adhering to our policies,” he said.

MSC Cruises is being strict about the new rule. A family traveling on the first sailing of the vessel was sent home after sneaking away from a tour in Naples, Italy, to explore the city on their own.

“They broke the bubble, and we don’t know where they went, so you can’t let them back on board,” Muskat explained. “Our CEO has made it very clear that there is no way around that. If somebody doesn’t follow the rules, they don’t get on board.”

Muskat said the safety of passengers and crew is the line’s number one priority. In addition to COVID testing at the pier and port touring restrictions, the line has implemented several other measures to ensure that passengers on MSC Grandiosa remain healthy, including social distancing and mask-wearing requirements on board the vessel, and a reduction of the capacity of some onboard venues.

MSC Cruises also has set aside cabins on MSC Grandiosa to isolate any passengers or crew who become ill, and arranged with port towns and their hospitals to take in such passengers and crew.

It’s a strategy that other cruise companies already are noticing. In the wake of MSC Cruises’ initial success, Costa Cruises has announced that it, too, will require day-of-departure testing for passengers in advance of sailings. The line, which plans to restart cruises later this month in Italy, initially had said it wouldn’t do such testing.

Costa Cruises also recently announced plans to only allow passengers to tour ports as part of a cruise-line organized tour.

A top Royal Caribbean Group executive also recently said that the company’s multiple brands were likely to test all incoming passengers for COVID-19, too.

Muskat said that, so far, cruisers were taking the new requirements in stride.

“We’re getting no complaints about it,” he said. “I think people realize that this is the new world we’re in right now. Things aren’t the same as they used to be, and the guests understand that.”

That said, Muskat said the cruising experience on MSC Grandiosa wasn’t as different now as some people might think, despite all the new rules and procedures.

“The pools are open, the entertainment is open, the bars and lounges are open,” he noted. “We’re very closely practicing social distancing, (but) we have great signage on board telling people where to sit or where to walk, just like you would see in many places today.”

While passengers can’t get off in ports on their own, those who have previously received a voucher because of the cancellation of a cruise who book a new Welcome Back cruise-only fare will receive up to three complimentary shore excursions. For all new bookings, three shore excursions can be added to the Welcome Back offer for 100 euros (about $119).

 

MSC Cruises also has added a COVID-19 insurance plan — currently only available to residents from Schengen area countries — that will reimburse passengers if they have to cancel a cruise due to developing the illness or fall ill during or soon after a cruise. For passengers from Italy — the majority of passengers currently booking the ship — the insurance is included in the fare. For all other passengers, it can be purchased for 18 euros (about $21).

For now, only residents of Europe’s Schengen countries are allowed to book the new MSC Grandiosa sailings.

So, has MSC Cruises cracked the code for a wider resumption of cruising? Muskat said he was hesitant to put it that way, given the potential for setbacks. But he was upbeat about the first few weeks of MSC Grandiosa’s return to service.

“I don’t think anybody is declaring 100% victory,” he said. “Have we cracked the code? I don’t know. Is what we’re doing right now working? Yes. Are we making continued enhancements and tweaks to it? Yes, and we learn every day.”

When asked if the procedures in place for the sailings of MSC Cruises were scalable to hundreds of cruise vessels across the globe, Muskat said that remained to be seen.

“So far, it’s gone very smoothly, but we’re also not filling a ship of 5,000 people,” he said, noting MSC Grandiosa was operating at significantly reduced capacity. “And, so far, we’re not sailing our ships all over the world as we’re reintroducing our ships in a phased approach.”

Muskat noted that a second MSC Cruises ships, MSC Magnifica, would start sailing out of Italy at the end of September, and the line would go from there.

“We’ll have to see how scalable it is,” he said. “I think it’s going to be a while until the industry is sailing at 100%.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting and encouraging.  Does anyone know at what capacity MSC is sailing?  It would also be interesting to know how they are doing the ship sponsored shore excursions i.e. are they filling the tour busses, is the tour simply a bus ride or are there opportunities to get off the bus under controlled conditions, etc.  We generally like to tour on our own but on the other hand in some ports we have toured a city using hop on/hop off busses without getting off the bus. The downside being not to be able to explore a port as much as we would like. In some ports we have not gotten off the ship at all.  If MSC's efforts to create a "bubble" actually work, this may be a way to get back to cruising without having to sacrifice too much.

 

Also, does anyone know how MSC is handling the passengers it has had to refuse embarkation?  Do they get a refund, will travel insurance cover any unrefunded expenses like air fare, etc.?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jssabs said:

Interesting and encouraging.  Does anyone know at what capacity MSC is sailing?  It would also be interesting to know how they are doing the ship sponsored shore excursions i.e. are they filling the tour busses, is the tour simply a bus ride or are there opportunities to get off the bus under controlled conditions, etc.  We generally like to tour on our own but on the other hand in some ports we have toured a city using hop on/hop off busses without getting off the bus. The downside being not to be able to explore a port as much as we would like. In some ports we have not gotten off the ship at all.  If MSC's efforts to create a "bubble" actually work, this may be a way to get back to cruising without having to sacrifice too much.

 

Also, does anyone know how MSC is handling the passengers it has had to refuse embarkation?  Do they get a refund, will travel insurance cover any unrefunded expenses like air fare, etc.?

 

There were 4,000 guests on the first sailings, about two-thirds of Grandiosa's 6,440 double occupancy capacity.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is really encouraging, they are now on their third seven-day sailing with (so far) no incidents. If Crystal were to implement these protocols I would be happy to sail again. The Covid insurance is also a great selling point. My main concern remains the travel to and from the cruise, I'm just so scared of air travel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember this cruise goes to the same ports over and over (where they have agreements on the tour logistics) and is restricted to clients who can (theoretically, for the most part) arrive by car, embarking at different cities.

 

I don’t know if this is a model for Crystal or not. ??

Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, claudiaYVR said:

It is really encouraging, they are now on their third seven-day sailing with (so far) no incidents. If Crystal were to implement these protocols I would be happy to sail again. The Covid insurance is also a great selling point. My main concern remains the travel to and from the cruise, I'm just so scared of air travel.

Air travel is not as bad as one thinks. Every body wears a mask and this is strictly enforced.  If you fly on business class, you are not so close to others. In Europe in business class they leave the middle seat free. Of course there is still a risk, specially on very long flights. 
At the moment the MSC cruises are for Europeans. They are short cruises. The flights are also not very long from one country to the other. It is not worth it to fly from one continent to the other for a short cruise. But if Crystal could do this start from USA or Canada, it could be interesting for people living in those countries.
MSC has issued in August new terms and conditions for new bookings. Apparently they will accept people coming from high risk areas if they provide a negative COVID-19 test PCR at the moment of check in. I wonder how will that work. 
I would like to have more information on the cruises which are being operated by Dream Cruises in Asia (company which also belongs to Genting Hongkong). I have read that they started with a 50% occupancy in July and that they have in August an occupancy of more than 90%. How are they managing embarkation, life on board....

Ivi

Edited by travelberlin
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Roland4 said:

 

There were 4,000 guests on the first sailings, about two-thirds of Grandiosa's 6,440 double occupancy capacity.


2/3 capacity isn’t too much different from what our local restaurants and hotels are running at here right now — without almost any of the other safety precautions aside from masks.  I might be comfortable with that level and the above list of precautions, in an early phase.  🤷🏻‍♂️
 

Vince

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, travelberlin said:


MSC has issued in August new terms and conditions for new bookings. Apparently they will accept people coming from high risk areas if they provide a negative COVID-19 test PCR at the moment of check in. I wonder how will that work. 
 

Need they be reminded of asymptomatic passengers? Especially for those of us from COVID19 hot spots? That test at check in means nothing,  really.. You have no idea who any given passenger has been around whom or where he or she has been 😞  we(those of us from those hot spots) would need to quarantine for 2 weeks before sailing.. and the only two countries I would be willing to self quarantine will not be letting us yanks in any time soon 😞

Edited by wearesiamese
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, wearesiamese said:

Need they be reminded of asymptomatic passengers? Especially for those of us from COVID19 hot spots? That test at check in means nothing,  really.. You have no idea who any given passenger has been around whom or where he or she has been 😞  we(those of us from those hot spots) would need to quarantine for 2 weeks before sailing.. and the only two countries I would be willing to self quarantine will not be letting us yanks in any time soon 😞

I understand that asymptomatic also show if they have COVID-19 when they are tested. So I guess tests at check in are the only way to identify who is carrying the disease. 
What does not seem to bring much are temperature checks at check in. 
Ivi

Edited by travelberlin
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, travelberlin said:

I understand that asymptomatic also show if they have COVID-19 when they are tested.

Yes, but it usually takes at least a couple of days after exposure before the test is positive, regardless of whether or not they will become symptomatic.  Plus, the test is not perfect.  I do think that MSC seems to have a great protocol in place, but people could still get on board with covid if the timing is right (wrong?).  This would be of much greater concern for anyone arriving via public transportation than those driving themselves to the port.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, travelberlin said:

I understand that asymptomatic also show if they have COVID-19 when they are tested. So I guess tests at check in are the only way to identify who is carrying the disease. 
What does not seem to bring much are temperature checks at check in. 
Ivi

 

4 hours ago, SusieQft said:

Yes, but it usually takes at least a couple of days after exposure before the test is positive, regardless of whether or not they will become symptomatic.  Plus, the test is not perfect.  I do think that MSC seems to have a great protocol in place, but people could still get on board with covid if the timing is right (wrong?).  This would be of much greater concern for anyone arriving via public transportation than those driving themselves to the port.


I’ll be really glad when we can move past temperature checks as a check overall.  In one sense they’re doing a good job of catching passengers with other potentially contagious conditions, but we all know asymptotic and presymptomatic transmission are a big issue with this virus.  I think (looking at this from my operations perspective with no medical education whatsoever)  self-contained rapid tests will be the next major key for cruise lines, and eventually hopefully saliva tests, but those would seem to have that same initial lag.

 

We’re never going to catch everyone, there will be people onboard with COVID the same way there are people onboard with other communicable diseases no matter what the screening processes are.  Eventually — hopefully — the risk of that will be so low that we can drop the other precautions, but in the meantime, that’s where the other precautions come in to help reduce that elevated risk.

 

Vince

Link to post
Share on other sites

A report of a short cruise on the third sailing of the Grandiosa.

 

“Live From MSC Cruises' MSC Grandiosa: What's it Like Sailing on a Big Ship in the COVID Era?

For the past five months I had just been reading all the (mostly negative) news related to cruises, writing articles while waiting for the restart, cheered on the ships and followed the decisions of the Italian government -- until the announcement that MSC would restart cruising in the Mediterranean.On August 16, MSC Grandiosa got back to operations. I saw it from afar: a colleague from Genoa, looking out from the balcony overlooking the harbor, sent me the video of the ship that was finally returning to sail.Then on August 31 it was my turn for the third itinerary. A very welcome invitation: I wanted to personally try the new protocols and experience this new era of cruises. I live in Rome and I arrived at the port of Civitavecchia with a transfer organized by Msc, with masks and spaced seats. I had just two days on board, sailing to Palermo. Here are my thoughts from my brief voyage onboard MSC Grandiosa.

 

Taking the Covid Test

 

I have never taken the test before, and I must say it is a relief to know that every person who will board must do the test. You travel with a light heart when you feel safe. We waited for an hour approximately after the test (a swab), and then the result: negative for me and for the group I was travelling with.It's time to walk down the gangway and finally get on the ship. I'm excited. Steps that seem new, even if I had already been on Grandiosa. There are about 2,000 passengers on board, on a ship that can accommodate more than 6,000. The distancing is, in fact, ensured.

 

Health is the Priority
 

The departure is heart-pounding, more so even than a christening, while the port of Civitavecchia is slowly moving away. It seems light years have passed since the last time I was sailing.That the shipboard experience has changed is immediately clear. There are sanitizing gel stations distributed throughout the common areas. As I walk along the promenade I meet other guests: they all wear a mask, even when the distances would allow them not to wear it. And even on the outdoor decks I see more masks than I expected. Perhaps we all share a desire to feel safe.On the other hand, the strength of the maritime sector -- always -- also lies in its system of rules and in the ability of those who go to sea to respect them. Even when they change our habitual behaviors.There is the staff who supervise the ship to ensure that the new rules are respected. But in two days I have not come across a single person who broke them.The cabins are sanitized and every day equipped with protective devices available to the occupants. A maximum of four can enter the large elevators at a time; on the floor are indicated the four stations, also these suitably spaced.Like everyone else, I wear the MSC for Me bracelet. It's like having another cruise card, I can also open the door to my cabin. And above all, while respecting privacy, it is able to locate and trace the contacts with the other guests on the ship.Before meals, whether at the restaurant or at the buffet, it is mandatory to wash your hands in the special stations and the staff measures the body temperature at the entrance. So you sit down more lightly, while choosing what to eat.

 

What is the Buffet Experience Like?
 

It takes a few minutes to get used to the buffet served by the staff. But it doesn't take much, given the always abundant offer and the quality of the dishes that hasn't changed. The waiters, in addition to face masks, wear gloves while preparing the dishes. An additional guarantee.Indeed, in my opinion the new system teaches us to choose in a better way. Without filling the plate more than we would be able to eat.

 

We Still Have Fun

 

With or without masks, we have fun. After dinner, theatre shows, live music, and for those who want to play, there is the 4D cinema where you can shoot zombies or bandits, the Formula 1 simulator or the casino. And the face mask doesn't stop us from socializing and laughing. And it doesn't excuse anyone from making jokes when for the fourth consecutive time I don't hit a pin with the bowling ball. Sanitized too, of course.Is half face covered? It does not matter. I enjoy imagining the hidden half, I pay more attention to the eyes.And even the days go by as before: outdoor and indoor pools (with capacity restrictions), the thermal suite (also with capacity restrictions, and the sauna or steam room are open only for single use) massages, whirlpools, entertainment. For children and teenagers, in addition to the play areas and the mini club, the water slides and the adventure park are open (though not every day, and with capacity restrictions).

 

Excursions in a Bubble
 

But you don't necessarily have to stay aboard the ship during the day. For me, the stop in Naples has become an opportunity to visit Capri for the first time. But how does a protected excursion work? Transfer only for MSC Grandiosa passengers, reserved and sanitized. Obligation to wear masks on board the hydrofoil and buses. The tour guide also becomes a bit of our babysitter. Agostino, the tour guide is always with us and he knows every corner of the island. We have headphones to listen to him, but we don't go far from him. We know that he has an important task to ensure safety and compliance with procedures. We joke with him a little, good-naturedly, but we all follow the rules.

 

First Time Cruisers

 

With the restart of the cruises, you expect the first to book are the repeaters, yet this is not the case: on board there are many guests who are new to cruise. They chose it for the safety guarantee it offers and once on board they are discovering its infinite possibilities.But then there are the true aficionados, those who make you smile instantly. There is a couple, he is 96, she is 83. They have already done about 180 cruises and couldn't wait to get back on board. "We want to have fun and we are not afraid," they tell me. "We have already booked another cruise for November."

 

The Arrival in Palermo

 

The arrival in Sicily, in Palermo, is tinged with melancholy. It's time to say goodbye and get off the ship, while I feel so good being on board. Perfect organization from the first to the last moment, pampering, comfort and a sense of protection: going on a cruise today is a nice gift to give to yourself -- and one of the safest ways to travel.“

 

it was posted by Cruise Critic.

 

Ivi

Edited by travelberlin
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've said this before but I think we should contact our Congress people in the US and ask them to do a temporary (or permanent) halt of the law that prohibits cruises without foreign port (ok not a totally accurate description).   Lines could do a Boston to Miami or similar to get people back on board without having to worry that much about air transportation.  Sure you might have to fly to ports but I'd think easier to manage than to/from foreign ports and you could drive if you had to.  

I think that would get things rolling again for cruises in the US.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with RiverCruising.co.uk
      • Q&A: Cruise Insurance with Steve Dasseos of TripInsuranceStore.com
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...