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How long to get going from cool/cold layup?


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With lots of people are speculating on when ships will begin crusing again I thought I would take a shot at it from the current industry recommended requirements I have read about in Cruise Industry News.  These are my best guesses,  your input is very welcome.

 

2 to 5 days to have crew contract issued and signed back.

2 to 7 days Crew flight arrangements

21 days of isolation  (CLIA recommendation)

7 days to bring ship systems back on line

7 to 21 days for recertification 

3 to 14 days for ship relocation 

 

Minimum 42 day Maximum 75

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I would be more of the 14 to 18 day ......... people are already certified.... trained  just laid off, experienced and the cruise line knows who and where...  I dont think any one is going to spend 21 days in quarantine....   ALL YOU  you have to do is order stores, fuel, file  port requests.      Everyone in the industry is hanging loose

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5 hours ago, GICNJC said:

With lots of people are speculating on when ships will begin crusing again I thought I would take a shot at it from the current industry recommended requirements I have read about in Cruise Industry News.  These are my best guesses,  your input is very welcome.

 

2 to 5 days to have crew contract issued and signed back.

2 to 7 days Crew flight arrangements

 

Add  the crew have to get medicals from specific Doctors  at their own expense   which could take longer than a few days

arrangements for flights  to/from  Countries closed to some Nationalities  could be  problematic

I would guess 75+ days to start up again

JMO

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2 hours ago, Hawaiidan said:

I would be more of the 14 to 18 day ......... people are already certified.... trained  just laid off, experienced and the cruise line knows who and where...  I dont think any one is going to spend 21 days in quarantine....   ALL YOU  you have to do is order stores, fuel, file  port requests.      Everyone in the industry is hanging loose

That's not all. Any ship that's been in cool or cold layup will have to undergo maintenance to restore it to operating condition and will be required to be recertified for operation by maritime regulatory authorities. That recertification will require some time in drydock in many cases. If you do a search you'll find a post by Cruise Critic's resident chief engineer chengkp75 explaining what will have to be done. 

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We're six moths into this and some crew members still have not been able to get back home. I see no reason to think a restart, especially with some ships in cold layup, will happen quickly. I don't even think the ships have gone into cold layup yet, a process that takes some time. My guess is three months once the decision is made to resume.

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The most important thing to consider is that NCLH is not putting these ships into cool lay up so to bring them back into service soon. Once the decision has been made for a particular ship to go into cool lay up, the expectation should be that the ship won’t be sailing ( with passengers) for at least six (6) months, perhaps more. 
 

A big chunk of revenue in the form of down payments for future cruises, will immediately be going back out the door to those with easily recognized now cancelled cruises clamoring to get their deposits back.

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On 9/9/2020 at 1:38 PM, Hawaiidan said:

I would be more of the 14 to 18 day ......... people are already certified.... trained  just laid off, experienced and the cruise line knows who and where...  I dont think any one is going to spend 21 days in quarantine....   ALL YOU  you have to do is order stores, fuel, file  port requests.      Everyone in the industry is hanging loose

CLIA has allready indicated crew must isolate off ship in embarking city for 21 days before getting on any ship.

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Just thought of two other ways to evaluate the return to Oceania cruises:

 

As O demographics are retired folks, O may be the last on NCL's lines to return as the fear of death and public knowledge will no doubt will scare NCL executives,

and

For those using O air,  usually the air is confirmed at least 90 days in advance.

 

 

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On 9/14/2020 at 4:11 PM, GICNJC said:

Just thought of two other ways to evaluate the return to Oceania cruises:

 

As O demographics are retired folks, O may be the last on NCL's lines to return as the fear of death and public knowledge will no doubt will scare NCL executives,

and

For those using O air,  usually the air is confirmed at least 90 days in advance.

 

 

You must be kidding..

Thats the weirdest thing Ive heard lately..

Jancruz1

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11 minutes ago, Jancruz said:

I spoke to the boss about this situation just this morning and he said 90 days is the minimum to get a ship ready..

Jancruz1

 

Thank you Jancruz.
Your post is most helpful as usual. There are so many of us who are desperately trying to figure it out when we’re able to get on the ship again.

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The first question is it warm or cold layup.... 6 months board line for warm layup   over six months to 5 years is cold lay up.... no power... they run on generators,  dehumidifier in lots of place...

 

To go warm to cold lay up could be 4-8 weeks work..... then to come out   it depends on how long.... yes to drydock, certification need plus re instate everything could take 4 months..

 

It is a big deal to put a ship into cold layup and it still costs about 30-35% of normal operation costs...... where warm layup is about 50-60% of normal cost

 

I hope this very basic over view.. give people some idea.......

 

Cheers Don

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45 minutes ago, Queen of DaNile said:

There goes my hope for November 2020.

Why? We have no information as to which Oceania ships have gone into cool lay up.

 

I still have a cruise booked, in the Sirena, that is 61 days out. In fact, we signed up for a three (3) day pre-cruise tour with Oceania, so our scheduled departure is less than 60 days out. 
 

Sixty days is far less than ninety days. If the Sirena is in cool layup , requiring a minimum of ninety days to restart, what does that say about the integrity of senior Oceania management not being forthcoming about the status of our cruise?

 

Outside of the Insignia, which we know isn’t sailing, we don’t know the current status of any ships in Oceania’s fleet. For example, I would doubt Oceania would leave those ships docked , or anchored, in Maine all winter. They may sail and then go into layup, but I doubt they’re in that status now.

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13 minutes ago, pinotlover said:

...In fact, we signed up for a three (3) day pre-cruise tour with Oceania, so our scheduled departure is less than 60 days out.... 
 

 

 

Should you get to sail, I'm very interested in your thoughts on your pre-cruise.  We are doing a similar pre-cruise - a four-day culinary one - next year on Regent, and they use the same contractor as O.

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4 hours ago, pinotlover said:

If the Sirena is in cool layup , requiring a minimum of ninety days to restart, what does that say about the integrity of senior Oceania management not being forthcoming about the status of our cruise?

 

Unfortunately anyone paying close attention to the history of how NCLH has behaved during the pandemic shutdown has seen an ongoing pattern of selling cabins on ships that had zero chance of actually sailing until they reached the point of having no choice but to cancel. Management has displayed at best little real understanding of how long the cruising shutdown would extend and at worst an absolute lack of integrity by continuing to sell cabins and failing to cancel cruises in a timely fashion in order to maximize the company's cash on hand.

 

I shouldn't limit my disgust with cruise line management to NCLH. Carnival and Royal haven't behaved much better, if at all.

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5 hours ago, pinotlover said:

I still have a cruise booked, in the Sirena, that is 61 days out. In fact, we signed up for a three (3) day pre-cruise tour with Oceania, so our scheduled departure is less than 60 days out. 

On a ship whose next 3 cruises in Nov and early Dec are showing as fully waitlisted ?

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On 9/9/2020 at 6:38 PM, Hawaiidan said:

I would be more of the 14 to 18 day ......... people are already certified.... trained  just laid off, experienced and the cruise line knows who and where...  I dont think any one is going to spend 21 days in quarantine....   ALL YOU  you have to do is order stores, fuel, file  port requests.      Everyone in the industry is hanging loose

To make sure it’s safe for cruisers and staff alike firstly the staff would need to be tested prior to flying from their own country and when they land, prior to boarding and several more times prior to their first return cruise, then regular testing. Isolation is the safest and most effective way. The staff can isolate at a facility near/at the port for the 21 days. 
The staff will need further training for effective covid cleaning, covid staff and pax hygiene etc. Taking staff and pax’s temperature won’t be enough as someone can be asymptomatic but is covid positive and a carrier.
Everyone prior to boarding will need to fill out the medical form honestly but previously some people have had norovirus symptoms but have ticked the NO boxes on their form I have some doubts that everyone will be honest.

Like most people I’m desperate for cruising to recommence but I want to be safe when I do cruise again.

Edited by Issyalex
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On 9/15/2020 at 12:11 AM, GICNJC said:

Just thought of two other ways to evaluate the return to Oceania cruises:

 

As O demographics are retired folks, O may be the last on NCL's lines to return as the fear of death and public knowledge will no doubt will scare NCL executives,

and

For those using O air,  usually the air is confirmed at least 90 days in advance.

 

 

If Oceania’s demographics are retirees then I better not tell hubby as he’s only 54 and loves Oceania! Yes Oceania attracts a more mature pax but not all have one foot in the grave and the other foot on a bar of soap. 
 

as for you suggesting NCL leave Oceania till the last is unjustified. Oceania’s ships are smaller with more public areas than some of NCL’s massive ships. IMO Oceania’s ships would be the safer option. 

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33 minutes ago, Issyalex said:

Everyone prior to boarding will need to fill out the medical form honestly but previously some people have had norovirus symptoms but have ticked the NO boxes on their form I have some doubts that everyone will be honest.

Like most people I’m desperate for cruising to recommence but I want to be safe when I do cruise again.

I am afraid we'll have to do better than rely on passengers' answers.

I imagine one would need a letter of recent (?how recent) vaccination at the minimum.

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