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untailored bostonian

formal nights

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Vest = waistcoat,  never seen a string one but seen some very nice crocheted ones, they were all the fashion for the 60's  (1960s not age) hippy girl (or boy) with floral flared trousers. Have to search the attic for next cruise.

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5 hours ago, PORT ROYAL said:

 

For casual wear on previous Cruises, were your vests of the string variety and for Gala/Formal Evenings did the Line invite the addition of a knotted handkerchief, as headwear, for that extra sartorial wow? 😉

 

 

 

 

 

Suit vests.  Looks like I left my jacket on a chair.  Much easier to pack.

 

Think the wife and I can get by with just 2 carry-ons? 😏🙃

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9 hours ago, majortom10 said:

I do not think Cunard is a cruise line for you perhaps you might be more at home on Princess who allow you to virtually wear what you want on formal nights.

I book the itinerary and not the line.  The line is just the ride from here to there.

 

What is it with dress up?  Is it a ruling class thing?

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1 hour ago, untailored bostonian said:

I book the itinerary and not the line.  The line is just the ride from here to there.

 

What is it with dress up?  Is it a ruling class thing?

 

Feel you have correctly identified the "difference".

 

For Cunarders, a Cunard Cruise is considered as a total voyage package, the wonderful destinations coupled with the total Cunard onboard ambience and experience, not just using Cunard as a public bus to shunt a bunch of punters between some ports.

With regard to a "dress up - class thing".  Sorry, no - it's a respect thing.  Respect for Cunard, the ships, the venues, the staff and other Cunard guests.

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, PORT ROYAL said:

 

11 hours ago, PORT ROYAL said:

 

 

For Cunarders.

 

11 hours ago, PORT ROYAL said:

 

It's about respect

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is it with this Cunarders thing, we are all equal whether we've been on 200 cruises or looking forward to our first cruise. 

 

For a first time cruiser who  should be respected  every bit a much as a so called Cunarder, all they have to go on is what Cunard publish before they arrive at the ship. Cunard should respect them by ensuring this is consistent with what they publish on the ship. 

 

Inconsistency of messaging by Cunard is a lack of respect for customers  .

 

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On 9/25/2020 at 5:12 AM, Windsurfboy said:

 

What is it with this Cunarders thing, we are all equal whether we've been on 200 cruises or looking forward to our first cruise. 

 

For a first time cruiser who  should be respected  every bit a much as a so called Cunarder, all they have to go on is what Cunard publish before they arrive at the ship. Cunard should respect them by ensuring this is consistent with what they publish on the ship. 

 

Inconsistency of messaging by Cunard is a lack of respect for customers  .

 

I have been cruising for 25 years.  I knew people then who told me only Cunard represented a real cruising experience.  There is an innate classism in the history of sailing on Cunard.

 

The explicit classism portrayed in "Titanic" defined the historical nature of cruising.  It was Transportation. It was not a holiday experience. I'm not sure when the cruise as a vacation became the norm, but Cunard has maintained the nostalgia for cruising as experienced in the first half of the 20th century.

 

Of course by booking a Cunard cruise I am cognizant of these vestiges of classism.  The "Cunarders" are perhaps expressing their desire to MCGA.  I said earlier, the ship, the cruseline, is just my ride. I book the itinerary.  But "Cunarders" may be more influenced by the Cunard's culture.

 

While I may find the implied classist expectations dispiriting, I recognise them going in. I'll choose to look down on these less than egalitarian views, but I'll do my best to be chameleon. If they can't see me they won't wrinkle their classist noses.

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On 9/24/2020 at 5:39 PM, PORT ROYAL said:

 

Feel you have correctly identified the "difference".

 

For Cunarders, a Cunard Cruise is considered as a total voyage package, the wonderful destinations coupled with the total Cunard onboard ambience and experience, not just using Cunard as a public bus to shunt a bunch of punters between some ports.

With regard to a "dress up - class thing".  Sorry, no - it's a respect thing.  Respect for Cunard, the ships, the venues, the staff and other Cunard guests.

 

Added edit note: I do not believe I was being called a punter, not that I am not.

 

Punters noun
1 informal, chiefly British a person who gambles, places a bet, or makes a risky investment.
• a customer or client, especially a member of an audience.
• a prostitute’s client.

 

My guess this form of social insult improves the experience fot Cunarders.  Why is that?  Is this Britishness?

 

Respect for others is not determined courtier. Thus it is about class and not respect. To see it otherwise, imnho, is a character flaw.

 

The thespian nature of establishing one's class, ones character, by the clothes that they wear should not be over looked.

 

Edited by untailored bostonian

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10 minutes ago, exlondoner said:

What exactly do you mean by classism? 

Classism (noun)

prejudice against or in favor of people belonging to a particular social class.

 

In the first half of the 20th century before "the punters" could get around the world be air, sailing ships were expressly separated by class as shown in "Titanic".

 

Cunard represents vestiges of those times in the "this is how we dress for the propper cruise experience" motif.

 

It is what it is.  Right?  But when in Rome ...

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35 minutes ago, untailored bostonian said:

Classism (noun)

prejudice against or in favor of people belonging to a particular social class.

 

In the first half of the 20th century before "the punters" could get around the world be air, sailing ships were expressly separated by class as shown in "Titanic".

 

Cunard represents vestiges of those times in the "this is how we dress for the propper cruise experience" motif.

 

It is what it is.  Right?  But when in Rome ...

I've met people of all sorts and conditions on our transatlantic crossings: aristocrats, artists, teachers, shopkeepers, factory workers. With very few exceptions they mingle happily without snobbery or condescension. Proper dress on formal nights need not be expensive and it is certainly not "classist." What does have a whiff of classism is the suggestion that formal dress is something of which ordinary folk (which all of us are in the end!) are somehow incapable. 

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1 hour ago, untailored bostonian said:

I have been cruising for 25 years.  I knew people then who told me only Cunard represented a real cruising experience.  There is an innate classism in the history of sailing on Cunard.

 

The explicit classism portrayed in "Titanic" defined the historical nature of cruising.  It was Transportation. It was not a holiday experience. I'm not sure when the cruise as a vacation became the norm, but Cunard has maintained the nostalgia for cruising as experienced in the first half of the 20th century.

 

Of course by booking a Cunard cruise I am cognizant of these vestiges of classism.  The "Cunarders" are perhaps expressing their desire to MCGA.  I said earlier, the ship, the cruseline, is just my ride. I book the itinerary.  But "Cunarders" may be more influenced by the Cunard's culture.

 

While I may find the implied classist expectations dispiriting, I recognise them going in. I'll choose to look down on these less than egalitarian views, but I'll do my best to be chameleon. If they can't see me they won't wrinkle their classist noses.

I had to look up MCGA and am puzzled as to what the Maritime and Coastguard Agency has to do with Cunard but, each to his and her own.

There is no class issue on Cunard apart from that perceived in some minds. As Windsurfboy has said, we are all equal, and any atmosphere of Downton does not exist, whatever some may think or try and perpetuate.

 

You said it is what it is. It is, but that's because of the ethos of the line, just as barefoot cruising is the ethos of Windjammer. I wouldn't take my more formal evening dresses on a Windjammer cruise and that has nothing to do with classism or any other ism. It's how that particular line operates.

 

 Cunard passengers are no different from any other cruise line, we just like  the After Six dress and the more formal approach to cruising and it draws many of us back time and time again and although I 100% think clothes do not necessarily maketh the man or woman, seeing the majority of passengers in cocktail or evening wear does add to the atmosphere I sign up to when booking a Cunard cruise.

 

Hope you enjoy it too and your first Cunard cruise won't be your last.

 

 

Edited by Victoria2
quote was doubled up

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Certainly the popularity of school proms makes it seems unlikely that enjoyment of dressing up is tied to any particular class or income group. Personally I have very little interest in clothes, but I'm happy to conform, just as I would at a wedding or funeral. After all, one has to wear something, so it may as well be the expected thing. And I still sometimes wear the same black dress as I took on my first cruise in 1997. I really can't see that enjoying dressing up formally can be an indication of anything other than an enjoyment of dressing up formally.

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1 hour ago, untailored bostonian said:

 I'll choose to look down on these less than egalitarian views, but I'll do my best to be chameleon. If they can't see me they won't wrinkle their classist noses.

 

Is that really what you expect your fellow passengers will do if you wear a suit rather than a DJ?

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1 minute ago, exlondoner said:

 

Is that really what you expect your fellow passengers will do if you wear a suit rather than a DJ?

Another post said as much.  

 

Tell me what to expect if I attend a theater at night in a tee shirt and jeans?  It was suggested elsewhere that such casual dress in the evenings might make certian sections of the ship off limits.

 

Would you agree, or do you think my fellow cruisers might be dismayed and I might register their distress?

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4 minutes ago, untailored bostonian said:

Another post said as much.  

 

Tell me what to expect if I attend a theater at night in a tee shirt and jeans?  It was suggested elsewhere that such casual dress in the evenings might make certian sections of the ship off limits.

 

Would you agree, or do you think my fellow cruisers might be dismayed and I might register their distress?

 

On formal nights, I believe the dress code applies to the theatre, so a suit would be fine, but in a teashirt and jeans, you would proabably not be admitted, if the staff are on the ball. I imagine that your fellow passengers might be concerned and surprised that you were unable to read the widely published dress code. I wouldn't say,that was classist.

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There is more classism on this forum whenever dress code is mentioned than you'll ever meet on a Cunard ship. All I've met is  delightful people.

 

Classism is a new word one I've never seen used before but a useful invention.

 

But I'm  simple I  only understand simple words and simple sentences ,

for example :

 

"Dress" = what you you wear.

 

"As you please" = whatever you like , as little or as much as you want

 

"Any part of the ship" = anywhere, both inside and outside 

 

But these words must be too simple,  perhaps Cunard should have used longer words.

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9 minutes ago, exlondoner said:

Certainly the popularity of school proms makes it seems unlikely that enjoyment of dressing up is tied to any particular class or income group. Personally I have very little interest in clothes, but I'm happy to conform, just as I would at a wedding or funeral. After all, one has to wear something, so it may as well be the expected thing. And I still sometimes wear the same black dress as I took on my first cruise in 1997. I really can't see that enjoying dressing up formally can be an indication of anything other than an enjoyment of dressing up formally.

 

 

I'll be  72 she 70. This will be our 50th. I am not one of those that have saved each cruise like a knotch, but we have 15+ cruises to our credit.  2 TA. A Hawaii TP. Several 10+ day cruies.  This will be our first Cunard cruise.

 

As noted, we know what to expect, mostly.  My OP was mostly about how to pack.  On other cruise line I pack a suit, two dress slacks, and 2 suit quality vests.  Only once did I rent a tux, and that was for my first cruise.

 

I guess at heart I am a "punter". We selected this cruise for the double TA and the bucket list cruininf thr fyjods. Cunard is an irrevency for us.  We love sea day.  14 of 21 days will be at sea.  Since it is the end of August and 12 days of September, I have my fingers crossed for a force 12+++ cat5 storm mid Atlantic with 60+ foot swells.  🤷‍♂️🙃😱

 

All that said, I will act accordingly and only snicker occasionally.  However, if you chat me up, I was out of line when they handed out filters the day I was born.

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13 minutes ago, exlondoner said:

 

On formal nights, I believe the dress code applies to the theatre, so a suit would be fine, but in a teashirt and jeans, you would proabably not be admitted, if the staff are on the ball. I imagine that your fellow passengers might be concerned and surprised that you were unable to read the widely published dress code. I wouldn't say,that was classist.

But I might.  The costume expectations are, imnho, classism. To express, "One not able to conform to these standards is not desirable company." is classist.  I'm the same person n in t-shirt and jeans as I am in a tux.

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17 minutes ago, Windsurfboy said:

There is more classism on this forum whenever dress code is mentioned than you'll ever meet on a Cunard ship. All I've met is  delightful people.

 

Classism is a new word one I've never seen used before but a useful invention.

 

But I'm  simple I  only understand simple words and simple sentences ,

for example :

 

"Dress" = what you you wear.

 

"As you please" = whatever you like , as little or as much as you want

 

"Any part of the ship" = anywhere, both inside and outside 

 

But these words must be too simple,  perhaps Cunard should have used longer words.

Nah!  Frankly I get the sentiment. I understand that for many, this is their chance to put on the Rizt which is not their normal atire.  Cunard for them is a bit like an upscale Holiday Camp.

 

I hate the idea that I may need to have a couple of sports jackets [Tweed I suppose], a 3 pieces suit, a recently purchased  used tux, and me normal 2 suit quality vests and a fist full of ties.  

 

I'm intrigued by the notion that there is a class of cruisers self identified as Cunarders.

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45 minutes ago, exlondoner said:

Certainly the popularity of school proms makes it seems unlikely that enjoyment of dressing up is tied to any particular class or income group. Personally I have very little interest in clothes, but I'm happy to conform, just as I would at a wedding or funeral. After all, one has to wear something, so it may as well be the expected thing. And I still sometimes wear the same black dress as I took on my first cruise in 1997. I really can't see that enjoying dressing up formally can be an indication of anything other than an enjoyment of dressing up formally.

Not your dressing up.

 

Requiring that all others must follow your lead.

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17 minutes ago, untailored bostonian said:

But I might.  The costume expectations are, imnho, classism. To express, "One not able to conform to these standards is not desirable company." is classist.  I'm the same person n in t-shirt and jeans as I am in a tux.

 

As you are, no doubt, without any clothes at all. But please don't come to meals thus. 😀

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This thread appears to be about the dress of men, Tux or not. In my view we as men are an accessory to the ladies who will take the opportunity to dress in their finery, wear their best Jewellery. 

 

Why should I not dress accordingly to appease the OH and be in her good books.

 

Nothing about class but everything about harmony.😘

Edited by Redrobo

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47 minutes ago, Victoria2 said:

There is no class issue on Cunard apart from that perceived in some minds. As Windsurfboy has said, we are all equal, and any atmosphere of Downton does not exist, whatever some may think or try and perpetuate.

 

There is explicit class separation on Cunard. Queens Grill is for First Class passengers, Princess Grill for Second Class passengers and Britannia for Third Class passengers. If I book a Britannia Inside Cabin and am told I cannot dine in the Queens Grill, then we are not all equal. As far as I know, Cunard is the only line that still has explicit class dining.

 

There is explicit classism (not a new word BTW) in this topic.

 

I'd like to do another transatlantic crossing, but I am not sure the anachronistic practices of Cunard appeal.

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