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4 minutes ago, scottca075 said:

 

There is explicit class separation on Cunard. Queens Grill is for First Class passengers, Princess Grill for Second Class passengers and Britannia for Third Class passengers. If I book a Britannia Inside Cabin and am told I cannot dine in the Queens Grill, then we are not all equal. As far as I know, Cunard is the only line that still has explicit class dining.

 

There is explicit classism (not a new word BTW) in this topic.

 

I'd like to do another transatlantic crossing, but I am not sure the anachronistic practices of Cunard appeal.

 

Most Cruise lines have cabins/suites that give the occupants access to lounges and Dinning areas which are for them and them alone. Royal Caribbean and Celebrity are just two.

If you book an outside cabin on those two lines you cannot use the Suit lounge and the associated dining rooms. The exception are usually for passengers who have earned status, such as Pinnacle level on RCL.

 

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Redrobo said:

 

Most Cruise lines have cabins/suites that give the occupants access to lounges and Dinning areas which are for them and them alone. Royal Caribbean and Celebrity are just two.

If you book an outside cabin on those two lines you cannot use the Suit lounge and the associated dining rooms. The exception are usually for passengers who have earned status, such as Pinnacle level on RCL.

 

Most CL seen to have gone to premium added restaurants.  The one cruise we had on RLC they had dinner in the buffet area with table cloths and drink service. We thought that was nice.

 

Supper premium areas were making their appearance on other lines. I know there are the Queens and Prince categories and they have separate dining rooms.  Are their any lounges reserved for them?

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48 minutes ago, scottca075 said:

 

There is explicit class separation on Cunard. Queens Grill is for First Class passengers, Princess Grill for Second Class passengers and Britannia for Third Class passengers. If I book a Britannia Inside Cabin and am told I cannot dine in the Queens Grill, then we are not all equal. As far as I know, Cunard is the only line that still has explicit class dining.

 

There is explicit classism (not a new word BTW) in this topic.

 

I'd like to do another transatlantic crossing, but I am not sure the anachronistic practices of Cunard appeal.

Classification certainly exists on Cunard, as it does on some other cruise lines and airlines and hotels. The class to which I referred, was social class, hence my Downton comment and on that score, we are all equal.

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46 minutes ago, scottca075 said:

 

There is explicit class separation on Cunard. Queens Grill is for First Class passengers, Princess Grill for Second Class passengers and Britannia for Third Class passengers. If I book a Britannia Inside Cabin and am told I cannot dine in the Queens Grill, then we are not all equal. As far as I know, Cunard is the only line that still has explicit class dining.

 

There is explicit classism (not a new word BTW) in this topic.

 

I'd like to do another transatlantic crossing, but I am not sure the anachronistic practices of Cunard appeal.

These premium penthouse, suite, and Jr. suite with exclusive dining and facilities were spreading across all CL new builds.  That does not bother me.  I actually like that there is only one cash added Restaurants.

 

There are other CL with new divided class facilities and associated exclusive dining.

 

I'll adapt. As long as there are pools and hot tubs and an open ocean view I'll survive.

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9 hours ago, exlondoner said:

MSC, NCL, etc, etc.

 

Many cruise lines are setting up premium areas, even Carnival with its Havana Suites, but these premium areas are more akin to Concierge Level hotel floors, with private lounges. I don't know any other cruise line that assigns a designated dining room based on stateroom class.

 

I don't mind the formal nights for dining. I do think it is a bit much when it comes to formal dress in a theater or banning shorts ship wide after 6PM.

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9 hours ago, untailored bostonian said:

I like being in torn jeans and graphic t-shirts after 6pm.  Nothing class based about it.

 

1 hour ago, scottca075 said:

 

Many cruise lines are setting up premium areas, even Carnival with its Havana Suites, but these premium areas are more akin to Concierge Level hotel floors, with private lounges. I don't know any other cruise line that assigns a designated dining room based on stateroom class.

 

I don't mind the formal nights for dining. I do think it is a bit much when it comes to formal dress in a theater or banning shorts ship wide after 6PM.

It sounds as if you would both be more comfortable on other lines, Cunard is much more formal than you are used to.

I hope this thread has been useful to explain how the dress code works in practice. If you don't want to comply you won't be able to make use of all the facilities on the ship after 6pm.

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14 hours ago, scottca075 said:

 

There is explicit class separation on Cunard. Queens Grill is for First Class passengers, Princess Grill for Second Class passengers and Britannia for Third Class passengers. If I book a Britannia Inside Cabin and am told I cannot dine in the Queens Grill, then we are not all equal. As far as I know, Cunard is the only line that still has explicit class dining.

 

There is explicit classism (not a new word BTW) in this topic.

 

I'd like to do another transatlantic crossing, but I am not sure the anachronistic practices of Cunard appeal.

 

There is separation by what you can afford everywhere. 

 

Many cruise lines have separate suite dining,  e.g. celebrity the retreat, MSC the haven , Holland America, .......

 

Most cruise lines have speciality dining which you can't go in except by paying more, which is exactly the same as QG but you pay  more up front before you get on the ship.

 

The only true equal ones where everyone is  wellcome everywhere are some of the most expensive smaller ships

 

Airlines  have economy, business , first.

 

The Savoy,  Ritz, are ten times the price of a Premier inn

 

Michelin star restaurants charge more than  MacDonalds.

 

Places where you can't go unless you are willing/able to pay significantly more are just a way of life.

 

I  don't know a society where we are all equal but some are more equal than others doesn't exist.

 

Live with it, don't pick on Cunard

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5 hours ago, scottca075 said:

 

I do think it is a bit much when it comes to formal dress in a theater or banning shorts ship wide after 6PM.

 

If one feels so strongly, then don't book Cunard.  Simples.... 😊

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The dress code on Cunard makes the experience very special. 
We, personally, did not feel confined by the dress code and did not find the atmosphere on board stuffy or snobbish. It was just a beautiful and relaxing trip. We loved it!

My husband brought his dark suit to wear on the “gala” nights with ties and bow ties- he looked absolutely wonderful! 
Although you will see many men wearing tuxes on Cunard’s “gala” nights, my husband did not feel out of place with his dark suit in any way.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, naturelovergirl said:

The dress code on Cunard makes the experience very special. 
We, personally, did not feel confined by the dress code and did not find the atmosphere on board stuffy or snobbish. It was

My husband brought his dark suit to wear on the “gala” nights with ties and bow ties- he looked absolutely wonderful! 
Although you will see many men wearing tuxes on Cunard’s “gala” nights, my husband did not feel out of place with his dark suit in any way.

naturelovergirl,

Ditto....

 

Though we do wear the full formal gown and tux dress code, we too feel the same way you do on board. Though some not many but few do display airs of stuffy and snobbish attitude, they do not disturb the wonderful Ocean Liner experience on the QM2.

 

 "just a beautiful and relaxing trip. We loved it!" 

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I just wish they hadn't  cut back on the number of gala nights, on our last 16 day cruise just 3 gala nights. I would love minimium 3 gala nights a week, or even more on a itinerary heavy in sea days.  

 

I think Cunard are at sixes and sevens over what they want to be and hence dress code. They cut back on gala nights because they think they are perceived as too formal. The change the daytime dress code to dress as you please anywhere in the ship, but don't really mean it, and then contradict themselves.  They are trying to be all things to all people, instead of trying to be unique. They need to get their act together.

 

Cunard should exploit the fact they are a "dress up line" ,   but with a formal but fun positioning , there is a big enough market niche for this to be a  popular and profitable business for a small cruise line.

 

My simple solution 

 

Day time

 

After 6pm they  separate "formal" and "informal" parts of the ship, they should apply this definition 24hrs a day.

 

In the informal part of the ship the dress as you please code should apply as you read it, ie dress as you please.

 

In the day time there should be a stricter code in the rest of the ship  that is in what at night time is considered formal venues, minimium" golf club casual"

 

ie dress as you like in the buffet no need to change if you just want to grab a sandwich ,  but not in the restaurant etc......

 

After 6pm 

 

No need to change dress code, but don't shy away from gala nights, expanded on the themed nights, roaring twenties,  etc etc the more excuses to dress up the merrier.  Gala night should be the majority,  except on a few port heavy intinerarys

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19 hours ago, untailored bostonian said:

I like being in torn jeans and graphic t-shirts after 6pm.  Nothing class based about it.

 

Completely  agree, dress prefernce is not about class but personality and timing. 

 

When I  had to dress up in the week I couldn't get out of it quick enough,  now I can slop around the house all week, dressing up makes a vacation a change. Vacations are all about being comfortable,  you choose your venue to suit your style at the moment.

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1 hour ago, Windsurfboy said:

I just wish they hadn't  cut back on the number of gala nights, on our last 16 day cruise just 3 gala nights. I would love minimium 3 gala nights a week, or even more on a itinerary heavy in sea days.  

 

I think Cunard are at sixes and sevens over what they want to be and hence dress code. They cut back on gala nights because they think they are perceived as too formal. The change the daytime dress code to dress as you please anywhere in the ship, but don't really mean it, and then contradict themselves.  They are trying to be all things to all people, instead of trying to be unique. They need to get their act together.

 

Cunard should exploit the fact they are a "dress up line" ,   but with a formal but fun positioning , there is a big enough market niche for this to be a  popular and profitable business for a small cruise line.

 

My simple solution 

 

Day time

 

After 6pm they  separate "formal" and "informal" parts of the ship, they should apply this definition 24hrs a day.

 

In the informal part of the ship the dress as you please code should apply as you read it, ie dress as you please.

 

In the day time there should be a stricter code in the rest of the ship  that is in what at night time is considered formal venues, minimium" golf club casual"

 

ie dress as you like in the buffet no need to change if you just want to grab a sandwich ,  but not in the restaurant etc......

 

After 6pm 

 

No need to change dress code, but don't shy away from gala nights, expanded on the themed nights, roaring twenties,  etc etc the more excuses to dress up the merrier.  Gala night should be the majority,  except on a few port heavy intinerarys

 

It appears, in your dreams, you wish to "Carnivalise" parts of Cunard's ships.  Think it would be far easier for you to "Cunard" parts of Carnival's ships.  However, in reality, neither will happen, but please continue to dream of Carnivalisations, if it makes you happy.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by PORT ROYAL
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1 hour ago, PORT ROYAL said:

 

It appears, in your dreams, you wish to "Carnivalise" parts of Cunard's ships.  Think it would be far easier for you to "Cunard" parts of Carnival's ships.  However, in reality, neither will happen, but please continue to dream of Carnivalisations, if it makes you happy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What I'm suggesting is far more formal that the official cunard daytime dress code  of "dress as you please in any part of the ship". This is the official dress code because :

 

1) This dress code is published on the website by Cunard headquarters,  it is headquarters in any company who set the rules for in this case the ships to follow.  2) Websites are where you find the latest data. 3) This dress code on the website determines the clothes people bring with them.  4) Cunard cannot advertise their ships as "dress as you please on any part of the ship" and then change the rules when you get aboard, that would break the ASA code of conduct.

 

 

That fact that those on the ship who produce the daily newspaper haven't noticed that headquarters had changed the dress code and continued to publish the same message they have done for years , is either disrespectful to headquarters who they ignore, or  is disrespectful to passengers to whom they are giving contradictory advice. If they thought "dress as you please in any part of the ship" was misguided then they should have taken it up with headquarters not ignored it. 

 

Like them it's no good putting your head in the sand and pretending the new dress code doesn't exist, just because you don't like it. Cunard have already Carnivalised the dress code as you call it when they introduced the new one

 

 

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Clearly they don't really mean 'Dress as you please in any part of the ship'. They wouldn't, for instance, countenance hobnail boots on the dance floor or a three piece suit and mackintosh in the swimming pool. 😀 They might look askance at a seathrough nightdress in the church service too. 

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13 hours ago, Host Hattie said:

It sounds as if you would both be more comfortable on other lines, Cunard is much more formal than you are used to.

I hope this thread has been useful to explain how the dress code works in practice. If you don't want to comply you won't be able to make use of all the facilities on the ship after 6pm.

 

I've been on Cunard many times. My first cruise (vs my first ocean liner experience) was on Cunard in 1989.

 

Believing the policies are absurd and saying so isn't the same thing as saying you won't comply.

 

9 hours ago, Windsurfboy said:

There is separation by what you can afford everywhere. Many cruise lines have separate suite dining,  e.g. celebrity the retreat, MSC the haven , Holland America, ....... Most cruise lines have speciality dining which you can't go in except by paying more, which is exactly the same as QG but you pay  more up front before you get on the ship. The only true equal ones where everyone is  wellcome everywhere are some of the most expensive smaller ships. Airlines  have economy, business , first.. The Savoy,  Ritz, are ten times the price of a Premier inn. Michelin star restaurants charge more than  MacDonalds. Places where you can't go unless you are willing/able to pay significantly more are just a way of life. I  don't know a society where we are all equal but some are more equal than others doesn't exist. Live with it, don't pick on Cunard

 

Most of your points have nothing to do with the topic at hand. One can stay at a Premier Inn and still go eat at the Savoy Grill. PS, the dress code at the Savoy Grill as well as at the three Michelin starred Restaurant Gordon Ramsay is "smart casual". So is Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester; London's other three starred Michelin restaurant.

 

The MSC Yacht Club, NCL Haven etc don't have separate MDRs for these guests for dinner. They have more casual venues with food. Some of the VIP/Concierge programs offer free specialty dining with priority seating.

 

Specialty dining isn't the same as Queens Grill dining unless any passenger can eat at the Queens Grill for a fee.

 

The universe is getting more casual. Little will turn back that tide. Three starred Michelin restaurants aren't smart casual because they like it, but because it became an economic reality. Cunard will follow along one day as bookings drop or reduce Gala nights.

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5 minutes ago, scottca075 said:

 

... Cunard will follow along one day as bookings drop or reduce Gala nights.

 

This will be an interesting case study as currently in the end it is not an independent "Cunard" but "Carnival" who takes the big strategic decisions.

Which school of thought will they follow?

"One size fits all - let's be efficient and use the same solutions for all of our brands." or "We have a portfolio of brands - let's differentiate and offer different products to cover as broad a range of customer tastes as possible."?

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23 minutes ago, scottca075 said:

The MSC Yacht Club, NCL Haven etc don't have separate MDRs for these guests for dinner.

I've not travelled on either line but from reading on Cruise Critic it was my understanding that there do have separate dining rooms, hence the ship within a ship description.

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7 minutes ago, Host Hattie said:

I've not travelled on either line but from reading on Cruise Critic it was my understanding that there do have separate dining rooms, hence the ship within a ship description.

I'm pretty sure some NCL ships have The Haven, Private Dining Room and MSC have their Yacht Club restaurants, again, on selected ships.

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1 hour ago, Windsurfboy said:

Cunard have already Carnivalised the dress code as you call it when they introduced the new one.

 

Agreed, but only in areas of no real importance to many Cunarders.   

These restricted Carnivalised areas do not impinge on the ambience created on the majority of the ship.

Sadly, those of the Carnival Dress Code persuasion frequenting the remote Carnivalised places will miss out on a Cunard onboard experience.  The Nightclub being the only exception.

So why cruise Cunard?

 

 

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I believe the same holds true with Celebrity. We had a "sky suite" several years ago and we ate in the "suite only" dining room. I don't recall the name of it, but it was fairly small and btw, very good.

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9 minutes ago, PORT ROYAL said:

 

Agreed, but only in areas of no real importance to many Cunarders.   

 

 

 

 

Sorry I  do not understand how IN ANY PART OF THE SHIP, IE ALL OF THE SHIP ,can be of no real importance to Cunarders, do they inhabit lifeboats towed behind the ship

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26 minutes ago, Windsurfboy said:

 

Sorry I  do not understand how IN ANY PART OF THE SHIP, IE ALL OF THE SHIP ,can be of no real importance to Cunarders, do they inhabit lifeboats towed behind the ship

 

Let one assist with your comprehension.

When in the Restaurants, Bars, Theatre etc., adhering to the dress code, how others are dressed in the buffet, pub, casino, nightclub or garden room is of no real importance to many Cunarders, with the same level of import given to the Carnivalised venues.

 

 

Edited by PORT ROYAL
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