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1 hour ago, exlondoner said:

You must admit it is much quicker to type Cunarder than 'people who enjoy travelling as passengers on Cunard's ships' or some such, though personally I try to restrict the term to ships.

 

Yes,  but you could just say "Cunard passengers"  ,  but you must have noticed some people  use " Cunarders " to infer  more than just "Cunard passengers" and that they are speaking on behalf of  or belong to some entitled elite group.

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26 minutes ago, Windsurfboy said:

 

Yes,  but you could just say "Cunard passengers"  ,  but you must have noticed some people  use " Cunarders " to infer  more than just "Cunard passengers" and that they are speaking on behalf of  or belong to some entitled elite group.

 

I don't really read it like that: it seems to me to imply little more than people who have travelled on Cunard a lot and enjoy it. I don't really get the sense of entitlement or feeling of elite. Of course Cunard presumably has a slight sense of these things with its provision of diamond or platinum benefits. I would accept that people who have travelled on the ships are likely to have more knowledge of them than those of us who have only travelled a few times, though clearly this is not always the case.

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No pretensions.

 

Her indoors and I both have our own businesses, so time off is always at a premium. Together, we've only done QG (over 20+ times) and are Diamond (big deal!).

 

Of course we like being remembered, but that doesn't make us any better than anyone else..

 

We're just a couple of idiots that chuck the inheritance at Cunard (and stick rigidly to the dress code).

 

As I tell people; my bank manager is never sure whether I'm going on holiday or buying the ship.

Edited by BigMac1953
stupidity
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12 hours ago, exlondoner said:

You must admit it is much quicker to type Cunarder than 'people who enjoy travelling as passengers on Cunard's ships' or some such, though personally I try to restrict the term to ships.

 

I can't think of any other cruise lines where people refer to themselves as "Princessers" or "Celebrityiers" etc.

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On 10/27/2020 at 5:43 PM, snaefell said:

Unless the weather makes it absolutely necessary I hate having my arms covered or wearing a coat,I also feel so uncomfy wearing a tie,smart dress for me means wearing my shirt showing Jimi Hendrix live at Berkley University,I've had it many years now & love it,it also tends to get a great response from others!

Yeah, its always about the weather. We always dress up according to a weather outside, so its better to have a few types of clothing for such an occasion. Usually I always carry a coat with me just in case 

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There are two ways the term 'Cunarders'  seems to be used

 

1) As a shorthand when passing on your experience. 

 

2) when laying down the law as if you were CEO of Cunard, and telling other what to do and who to cruise with.

 

It's when it's used in the later mode that it annoys.

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26 minutes ago, Windsurfboy said:

There are two ways the term 'Cunarders'  seems to be used

 

1) As a shorthand when passing on your experience. 

 

2) when laying down the law as if you were CEO of Cunard, and telling other what to do and who to cruise with.

 

It's when it's used in the later mode that it annoys.

 

I think this is a little harsh on the.CEO of Cunard. I've never known one lay down the law about anything.😀

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3 hours ago, scottca075 said:

 

I can't think of any other cruise lines where people refer to themselves as "Princessers" or "Celebrityiers" etc.

 

True. I can think of a number of possible reasons.

 

1. Cunarder was there as a convenient readymade word - from the ships. It is easy to say and spell.

 

2. The examples you give are difficult to say, and similar ones for many shipping lines would be very long winded. Seabourners might be OK though.

 

3. Cunard is quite a distinct brand. Other lines appear to be more similar to several others,, so perhaps more interchangeable and less in need of distinguishing. Possibly.

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5 hours ago, scottca075 said:

 

I can't think of any other cruise lines where people refer to themselves as "Princessers" or "Celebrityiers" etc.

Many call themselves P&Oers that cruise with P&O and I am sure it is not a "I am better then you statement" just a statement made by those that cruise with P&O and like it.

Edited by majortom10
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15 hours ago, newjoisey said:

look out ....comin throu.......ugly american here AND platinum cunarder .....gang way /make way........werks fur me 

When you cruise Cunard, are you in "The Grills" or are you a "rower"??!!!

Truly, just kidding here....please do not flame me, I'm saying this in jest....gotta have a little fun these days, since it certainly isn't happening on a cruise ship....giggle!

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20 hours ago, exlondoner said:

 

I don't really read it like that: it seems to me to imply little more than people who have travelled on Cunard a lot and enjoy it. I don't really get the sense of entitlement or feeling of elite. 

 

My sentiments, exactly.

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Although off topic from the OP, I am uncomfortable using the term “Cunarder” to describe people. In my readings on ocean liner and transatlantic shipping history, a “Cunarder” is a ship operated by the Cunard Line.  The Carpathia, Ivernia, Saxonia and Queen Mary are “Cunarders”. I am a Cunard passenger.   As much as I completely identify with the line, its ships, history and way of life and style of service on board, I don’t consider myself a “Cunarder”.  

Edited by ClipperinSFO
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4 hours ago, ClipperinSFO said:

Although off topic from the OP, I am uncomfortable using the term “Cunarder” to describe people. In my readings on ocean liner and transatlantic shipping history, a “Cunarder” is a ship operated by the Cunard Line.  

 

Hear, hear!

 

I understand that language changes over time, and that words acquire new meanings according to how people use them. Nevertheless, the traditionalist in me really appreciates you pointing out the nuance here. 🙂

Edited by jzopp
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On 10/30/2020 at 10:42 PM, Lakesregion said:

One is either a Cunarder or one is not. Those that are know each other by their appearance, manners and ability to converse with other than their own family members. 

 

Well, I usually recognise them by their distinctive red funnels and black hulls. Oh, we may be talking about people, i.e. Cunard passengers, in which case I recognise them by their being on a Cunard ship.

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On 10/30/2020 at 12:43 PM, Windsurfboy said:

If you read this forum , the term Cunarder is only  used in those threads relating to dress code , and by people  " advising" other what to wear , or to try another cruise line. Never seen it used in another context 

This post made me curious. I did a search on the forum for the term "Cunarder" to see where it is used. The top 44 hits (first two pages...I bore easily) were divided as:

11 uses of the term in this thread

2 uses in other threads related to formal attire

8 uses in threads not related to formal attire and referring to people as Cunarders

15 uses referring to ships as Cunarders

6 uses related to the magazine named Cunarder

1 use related to the Cunarder mattress

1 use related to the Cunarder burger

and the thread about what the term means in the first place:

 

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On 10/2/2020 at 12:22 AM, BigMac1953 said:

 

The Widow Cliquot of course

 

Majestic Wines offering Veuve Clicquot Brut, Champagne at a £17 reduction if purchased with 5 other bottles, any mix of bottles

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On 10/30/2020 at 5:08 PM, scottca075 said:

 

I can't think of any other cruise lines where people refer to themselves as "Princessers" or "Celebrityiers" etc.

 

Ever looked at the Crystal cruises board? They talk about being 'crystallised' there. It's a bit of a cult so to refer to oneself as a Cunarder if you love the line so  much you identify with it seems innocuous to me, compared to that.

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2 hours ago, Mudhen said:

IMHO, this "Cunarder" business is just stupid. Whether you're an "er" or an "ist", who really cares? 

 

I think people get a little defensive when their use of the word is claimed to carry implications of superiority.

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