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Wildcatfish

Balcony Hammock on Allure?

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We are having a discussion about a family member sleeping in a hammock on our Allure balcony next summer.

 

Does the door to the balcony open from inside and out, or could the balcony person theoretically get locked out?  If the door remained unlocked or slightly opened would that affect the air conditioning inside the room?

 

Hopefully we'll be cruising next summer!  Until then... questions like this come up 🙂

 

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As long as you don't lock the door, the balcony will open. Your bigger issue will be the hammock being allowed.

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It would be pretty tight with furniture, also a rough landing if something snaps.

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I don't think Oasis class balconies have the structure or the width to support a hammock. They've got the hinged glass partitions to make cleaning easier. I guess I see that some cabins do have a post there, but I'm not sure about the other side and I would suggest not trying to rig something.

 

As to the door, they open from either side and don't believe they can be locked.

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You can lock the balcony door from the inside .

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I’ve taken a couple of 3” “C” clamps with me.  Those can clamp onto the steel beams and then give you something to tie the hammock to.

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2 hours ago, BirdTravels said:

Now, What are you going to tie your hammock to?  If you damage the ship, you need to buy a new one. 

 

If I need to reimburse Royal I will be happy to do that in 30 days...

...60 days

....definitely 90 days

...after 120 days I’ll contact my accounting department 😉

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I took a lightweight camping hammock on the allure last year and took plenty on naps in it. The issue will be your height. the width of the balconies are only about 10 feet wide and that leaves you with the hammock pretty high off of the deck so entering and exiting becomes a challenge.  (especially after a couple of cocktails).  or it you make the hammock lower it is not very comfortable for anyone  very tall.  I am only 5'6" so it worked out OK.  In fact I used it more as a swing type seat then a hammock.

Bottom line is yes you could easily sleep outside in it and not worry about getting locked out unless someone purposely locked you out so be nice to your cabin mate... 

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I just thought Allure had some balconys outfitted with hammocks. I am about to board Mein Schiff 1 and my balcony actually has a built in hammock- but i fear the Baltic is a triffle to cold this time of the year to sleep in their. Here ´s the balcony I will enjoy- hopefully- if my Covid test turns out negativ.

 

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1 hour ago, HodgeNNicole said:

Bottom line is yes you could easily sleep outside in it and not worry about getting locked out unless someone purposely locked you out so be nice to your cabin mate... 

 

Certainly don't want to upset my cabin mate/wife!  Important question in regards to my wife... if the door is not locked will that affect the air conditioning inside the cabin?

 

Whitshel... that is a picture of one happy and relaxed cruiser!

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@  

12 minutes ago, Germancruiser said:

I just thought Allure had some balconys outfitted with hammocks. I am about to board Mein Schiff 1 and my balcony actually has a built in hammock- but i fear the Baltic is a triffle to cold this time of the year to sleep in their. Here ´s the balcony I will enjoy- hopefully- if my Covid test turns out negativ.

 

Wow, that is an awesome balcony!

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Yes it looks great- sheer luck that I managed to grab one of those- they are just little bit more pricy then a regular balcony cabin- and they are the first to go.

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9 hours ago, Wildcatfish said:

 

Certainly don't want to upset my cabin mate/wife!  Important question in regards to my wife... if the door is not locked will that affect the air conditioning inside the cabin?

 

Whitshel... that is a picture of one happy and relaxed cruiser!

If the door is unlocked, but closed, it will not affect the air conditioning.  If it is left open, even slightly, it will affect not only the air conditioning in your cabin (the recirculation A/C will shut off), but it will affect the A/C in an entire block of cabins, as your cabin steals all the fresh air being supplied to the block of cabins.

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but if the sliding door is open whom are they stealing the fresh air from.?

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You can book a inside cabin if you like,  I book a cabin that I can do what is not available to a inside cabin .😇

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Thanks Chengkp75! I appreciate your help.  With the door closed but not locked my wife enjoys air conditioning inside and I don’t hear snoring outside 🙂

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1 hour ago, Hogbay said:

but if the sliding door is open whom are they stealing the fresh air from.?

There are two A/C systems for the cabins.  One, that is controlled by the cabin thermostat, and the opening of the balcony door, merely recirculates air within the cabin through an A/C unit for that cabin.  The second is the fresh air make-up system, which takes outside air, cools it, and delivers it to cabins to balance out the air removed by the constantly running bathroom exhaust vent.  This air is supplied to the cabins in such volume that there is a slight positive pressure in the cabin, to prevent smoke migration in case of a fire (air leaks out under the cabin door into the passage, not the other way around).  When a balcony door is opened, this drops the pressure in that cabin to atmospheric, and air, like water, seeks the path of least resistance, and more of the fresh air supply will flow to the cabin with the open balcony door, trying to rebuild the positive pressure.  The other cabins in the block of cabins that share the fresh air supply (typically all the cabins on one side of the ship on a given deck, and between the fire doors (so about 30 or so), will get less cool, fresh air, and the warmer air in the passageway will flow under the door into the cabins, and they will warm up.

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6 minutes ago, chengkp75 said:

There are two A/C systems for the cabins.  One, that is controlled by the cabin thermostat, and the opening of the balcony door, merely recirculates air within the cabin through an A/C unit for that cabin.  The second is the fresh air make-up system, which takes outside air, cools it, and delivers it to cabins to balance out the air removed by the constantly running bathroom exhaust vent.  This air is supplied to the cabins in such volume that there is a slight positive pressure in the cabin, to prevent smoke migration in case of a fire (air leaks out under the cabin door into the passage, not the other way around).  When a balcony door is opened, this drops the pressure in that cabin to atmospheric, and air, like water, seeks the path of least resistance, and more of the fresh air supply will flow to the cabin with the open balcony door, trying to rebuild the positive pressure.  The other cabins in the block of cabins that share the fresh air supply (typically all the cabins on one side of the ship on a given deck, and between the fire doors (so about 30 or so), will get less cool, fresh air, and the warmer air in the passageway will flow under the door into the cabins, and they will warm up.

Chief, would it then be true to say that on ships with the type of systems you are describing that:

 

Leaving your balcony door open for any length of time will: 

 

1) make cabins around yours less comfortable; and 

 

2) make cabins around yours less safe in the event of a smoke in the hallway event?

 

Thanks for sharing so much information with us.

 

Tom

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Yes to both.  And, nearly every cruise ship designed in the last 20 years has this type of system.

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