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Mardi Gras Sea Trials


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I noticed that the above article said that she would spend 10 days at sea then back at dock for final preparations for US arrival. Anyone know how much longer she will be in Finland before embarking for the states? Is she ahead of schedule? Just wondering since she isn't scheduled to depart for cruises for another 4 months, if we are cruising by then. Wonder what she'll be doing here in the states if she comes over before February...

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16 hours ago, tidcruiser said:

Just curious. What do the sea trials consist of? Maybe a question for chengkp75.

 

16 hours ago, shof515 said:

its a complete test of all of the systems onboard the ship.. Make sure the engine rpms is stable, can the ship handle going 20+ knots for hours on end. make sure the thursters and props is working

The wiki definition is underwhelming as to details.  Sea trials are far more than propulsion and stability tests, though those of course are important.  Sea trials will range from the mundane, such as "swinging the ship" to adjust the magnetic compass to more closely match the gyro compass, to emergency scenarios like black-out recovery, testing of fire fighting, fire extinguishing, and fire detection systems and the like.  Every system on the ship will be proved to the satisfaction of the owner's representatives.  Navigation systems to stage lighting and sound.  Vacuum toilet system and waste water treatment plant to the proper temperature in the bar refrigerators. Fuel handling systems (especially the new LNG fuel system) and A/C performance.

 

After sea trials, it is difficult to say how long the ship will remain in Finland.  There could be repairs needed that were found during trials (fairly common).  Since the company does not own the ship until sea trials and any required repairs are completed, at which time the check is handed over, much of the "owner's materials" have not been placed on the ship, so there will be some "storing" of goods and equipment.  Then there will be crewing up and final clean up.  Bunkering and taking on water.

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4 hours ago, regoodwinjr said:

 The Panorama finished sea trials on July 18th and then handed over to Carnival on October 29th.  It seems like the they're on schedule to get to Florida a little before the first scheduled cruises.

I imagine the initial US inspections and crew checks will take longer than normal. Perhaps the whole ship will need to be quarantined. Maybe Carnival is allowing extra time for extra disinfecting?

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43 minutes ago, BlerkOne said:

I imagine the initial US inspections and crew checks will take longer than normal. Perhaps the whole ship will need to be quarantined. Maybe Carnival is allowing extra time for extra disinfecting?

There typically isn't a full Carnival crew onboard during trials, just senior staff, since the company does not own the ship yet.  There will be several hundred shipyard workers, and a raft of manufacturer's service technicians.  So, crewing may not have happened yet, though Finland has no restrictions on crew changes at this time.

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18 minutes ago, chengkp75 said:

There typically isn't a full Carnival crew onboard during trials, just senior staff, since the company does not own the ship yet.  There will be several hundred shipyard workers, and a raft of manufacturer's service technicians.  So, crewing may not have happened yet, though Finland has no restrictions on crew changes at this time.

I was hypothesizing why Carnival would want to get the ship to the US early. I know Carnival doesn't own the ship until they sign off on it, which likely will be just before the ship crosses the Atlantic.

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13 hours ago, chengkp75 said:

 

The wiki definition is underwhelming as to details.  Sea trials are far more than propulsion and stability tests, though those of course are important.  Sea trials will range from the mundane, such as "swinging the ship" to adjust the magnetic compass to more closely match the gyro compass, to emergency scenarios like black-out recovery, testing of fire fighting, fire extinguishing, and fire detection systems and the like.  Every system on the ship will be proved to the satisfaction of the owner's representatives.  Navigation systems to stage lighting and sound.  Vacuum toilet system and waste water treatment plant to the proper temperature in the bar refrigerators. Fuel handling systems (especially the new LNG fuel system) and A/C performance.

 

After sea trials, it is difficult to say how long the ship will remain in Finland.  There could be repairs needed that were found during trials (fairly common).  Since the company does not own the ship until sea trials and any required repairs are completed, at which time the check is handed over, much of the "owner's materials" have not been placed on the ship, so there will be some "storing" of goods and equipment.  Then there will be crewing up and final clean up.  Bunkering and taking on water.

Any ideas on how they will be testing the LNG fuel system? Is there anywhere there for them to load fuel?

 Thanks 

Ron

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I can do the test and adjust of the stage lighting, sound, and theatrical rigging. I would love to be aboard during sea trials and observe the crash test stop of a 180,000 ton vessel. That....would be impressive!

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6 hours ago, Moviela said:

I can do the test and adjust of the stage lighting, sound, and theatrical rigging. I would love to be aboard during sea trials and observe the crash test stop of a 180,000 ton vessel. That....would be impressive!

Just a note, that the ship does not weigh 180,000 tons.  In fact, the number 180,000 shouldn't even have the unit "tons" after it.  Gross Tonnage is a "unitless" number that represents the volume of the ship, not it's weight.  I would suspect that the Mardi Gras actually weighs about 70-80,000 tons (that is displacement tons).  And, a "crash stop" for a cruise ship is not what can be expected from a naval vessel or a cargo vessel, and will take over a mile to accomplish.

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