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MississippiMom

Allure - “Talk” to Me, Because it Looks Like TOO MUCH

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Yes, I know about the no sail order, and the current unknown about the future of cruising.  But we had a large multigenerational July 2020 cruise canceled, and we have started dreaming about Summer 2021 family cruising.  My brother, a father of three under 12 children, is loving the idea of Allure of the Seas.  I have concern that those over age 80 will have a tough time with such a large ship, and might become so overwhelmed that they retreat to their cabins.  None of us have sailed on a ship as large as AOS.  I think only one family member has actually sailed RCCL and it was on Grandeur.  Most of us are either Carnival or NCL cruisers, so this Allure ship option is definitely landing in the “unfamiliar” category.

 

We have looked at several YouTube videos and it’s really hard to not love the idea of sailing on Allure.  But is it a young family ship?  Ages of our potential travelers will vary from 4 - 84 (maybe even 88, if that aunt’s health allows), with the bulk being in their mid 40s to mid 50s.

 

Help me understand the pros/cons, if you have sailed on Allure.  The sailing we are considering, out of Port Canaveral,  would go to CocoCay, St. Kitts, and St. Thomas.

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My Mom is in her 80's and Allure is one of her favorite ships.  Loves all the shows and all the different places to eat.  Central Park is a nice place to relax and listen to music, but she loves being in the middle of all the activity!  Age is just a number.

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Posted (edited)

Allure will be like NOTHING that you have experienced on Carnival. And yes, there will be something for everyone. In fact, there will probably be more to do than what anybody in your group can physically do in a week. We found ourselves taking a break from activities and choosing to do nothing a few times because we were becoming exhausted trying to do it all. If there’s one thing that Royal does well is to appeal to a very broad demographic, specially with these Oasis class of ships. Everybody in your family will have plenty to do. 
 

As far as the ship goes: Yes, it’s HUGE, but the way that it’s designed makes it very easy to navigate and not feel overwhelmed. The ship is divided in “neighborhoods”, and each one has its own set of restaurants and activities. This allows for things to be decentralized and it spreads out passengers more evenly throughout the ship. Obviously you’re free to roam the entire ship, but you can find things to do without going too far. For example, our cabin was located in The Boardwalk, and we found ourselves spending more time in that area of the ship than others. 
 

In my opinion, Oasis class ships are something that should be experienced at least once. They have a wow factor that no other cruise ship can currently match. With that said, they may not be for everybody. They have redefined cruising in ways that people who appreciate a more traditional cruising experience don’t favor. But the only way to know if it’s for you is by giving it a shot. 

Edited by Tapi

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It's impossible for me to predict what someone will love or hate. I will say that my parents enjoy the old folks cruises for the activities that are geared to that age group, such as lectures and concerts, and more interesting ports. Allure has limited offerings like those.

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Allure may be "large" but it's also broken down into smaller areas.  I can see those in their 80s sitting in Central Park.  I see them enjoying the amazing ice skating shows, production shows, water shows, etc..  They can hang out on the Boardwalk or, if daring, take a spin on the carousel.

 

When you compare Carnival's shows to Allure's, you will wonder why you never made the switch before.

 

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My 80 year old mom, (late 70s at the time), loved our cruises on Harmony and Allure.  She loved sitting at the Trellis Bar in Central Park, and enjoyed the shows.  I agree with Tapi, these ships are something everyone should experience at least once.

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I found getting around and using the kiosk at the end of the deck hard to use. Maybe print out deck plans before you go. I never did figure out how to make them show other decks. You have to schedule shows in advance. I loved the shows, but yes it is different.

 

Oasis i didnt feel like I saw it all the first time so did it again. It is different than smaller ships, but better.

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, Pratique said:

It's impossible for me to predict what someone will love or hate. I will say that my parents enjoy the old folks cruises for the activities that are geared to that age group, such as lectures and concerts, and more interesting ports. Allure has limited offerings like those.

I agree that a lot of it has to do with what an individual will personally like. Some “younger at heart” seniors may prefer the livelier atmosphere on Carnival or Royal and would never consider an “old people” cruise line. 
 

Along the same lines. we are a family with young children (8 and 10 years old). As much as we enjoyed sailing on the Allure, and as wowed as we were, we actually preferred the more sedate and traditional experience that we encountered on our last cruise (HAL’s Nieuw Statendam). Even though Holland America is a cruise line that caters heavily to a more senior clientele, and the activities for kids and younger adults were considerably more limited, all of us had an absolutely memorable cruise. 
 

Still, I wouldn’t pass up the opportunity to sail on an Oasis class ship again. I thought that Allure was fantastic. 

Edited by Tapi

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Never ever turn down an opportunity to cruise on an Oasis class ship. 

Many areas and lot of choices. 

A ship for everyone. Go and enjoy all the wonderful outdoor areas. Love Allure ans Harmony!!!!!!!!

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Personal opinion may vary, but I'm in my mid-70's and my wife is in her late 60's (which makes us young by comparison to the number of people we meet onboard in their 70's and up). The nice thing about Oasis class ships is that everything is so spread out and "themed" for different interests that you will find different age groups "inhabiting" completely separate areas of the ship. We have six cruises booked for 2021 - two on Harmony and four on Allure- and once we get back on board (whenever that happens😟) we will probably book more on that class of ship through the 2023 season.

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👍Love the bigger ships.  We first sailed on the Oasis when we were in our early 60’s and loved every minute.  We then did Allure and B2B on Harmony.  We were very disappointed that our May Oasis was cancelled as it left from Cape Liberty, so close.

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Posted (edited)

Age is not 'just a number.' While the rate and extent of progressive debilitation varies widely, it's worth considering your senior travelers' cognitive and physical endurance.

 

They don't need to do everything, and having a good range of entertainment and dining potentially appealing to a very broad demographic is a wonderful benefit of Oasis-class ships. Listening to the kids talking about how much fun they're having will add to the seniors' enjoyment. 

 

Cognitively, if they've 'slowed down' or gotten a smidge 'senile,' you may need to review the day's options and break it down into a simplified menu of choices (rather than just hand them a daily schedule to figure out). Having to schedule show times and speciality restaurants and work around excursion times can be a drag.

 

Physically, a much larger ship does mean longer walks to get around, but not hugely so. If their rooms are near elevators that's a help. Unfortunately, the MDR and buffet tend to be at the back of the ship and the theater for shows in the front, so wherever they are, there will be some walking. Those not using scooters can start early and take breaks. When I move through the ship, I like to pass through Central Park of the Royal Promenade. 

 

Royal's big ships have a pretty easy-to-navigate layout. From memory, the high points:

 

1.) Deck 5 - Royal Promenade. Like a quaint Main Street in a walkable small city. Shops and places to eat. 

2.) Deck 7 - read of ship, the Boardwalk. Outdoor 'neighborhood' with a carousel, restaurants and shops, the the AquaTheater where impressive diving shows are done. Fun for all ages. 

3.) Deck 8 - Central Park. Surprisingly lush, uncrowded planted space to stroll through leisurely, usually uncrowded, open to the sky. 

1 - 3 Are good for leisurely strolls or sitting around chatting and people watching.

4.) Lower front of ship - main theaters for evening shows.

5.) Rear of ship - Deck 16 or so main buffet, lower decks main dining rooms. 

6.) Deck 14, front - Adventure Ocean - the kids' club area. 

7.) Deck 15/16 or so - the outdoor topside pool/hot tub/lounge chairs/bars area. Where you get soft serve frozen yogurt on a cone. Often with a kid's water 'park' type entertainment area. 

 

Apologies if I got a deck wrong. If you learn that 'mini-guide,' I think you'll expand from it to understand an Oasis-class ship layout nicely. 

Edited by drrich2

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19 minutes ago, drrich2 said:

Age is not 'just a number.' While the rate and extent of progressive debilitation varies widely, it's worth considering your senior travelers' cognitive and physical endurance.

 

They don't need to do everything, and having a good range of entertainment and dining potentially appealing to a very broad demographic is a wonderful benefit of Oasis-class ships. Listening to the kids talking about how much fun they're having will add to the seniors' enjoyment. 

 

Cognitively, if they've 'slowed down' or gotten a smidge 'senile,' you may need to review the day's options and break it down into a simplified menu of choices (rather than just hand them a daily schedule to figure out). Having to schedule show times and speciality restaurants and work around excursion times can be a drag.

 

Physically, a much larger ship does mean longer walks to get around, but not hugely so. If their rooms are near elevators that's a help. Unfortunately, the MDR and buffet tend to be at the back of the ship and the theater for shows in the front, so wherever they are, there will be some walking. Those not using scooters can start early and take breaks. When I move through the ship, I like to pass through Central Park of the Royal Promenade. 

 

Royal's big ships have a pretty easy-to-navigate layout. From memory, the high points:

 

1.) Deck 5 - Royal Promenade. Like a quaint Main Street in a walkable small city. Shops and places to eat. 

2.) Deck 7 - read of ship, the Boardwalk. Outdoor 'neighborhood' with a carousel, restaurants and shops, the the AquaTheater where impressive diving shows are done. Fun for all ages. 

3.) Deck 8 - Central Park. Surprisingly lush, uncrowded planted space to stroll through leisurely, usually uncrowded, open to the sky. 

1 - 3 Are good for leisurely strolls or sitting around chatting and people watching.

4.) Lower front of ship - main theaters for evening shows.

5.) Rear of ship - Deck 16 or so main buffet, lower decks main dining rooms. 

6.) Deck 14, front - Adventure Ocean - the kids' club area. 

7.) Deck 15/16 or so - the outdoor topside pool/hot tub/lounge chairs/bars area. Where you get soft serve frozen yogurt on a cone. Often with a kid's water 'park' type entertainment area. 

 

Apologies if I got a deck wrong. If you learn that 'mini-guide,' I think you'll expand from it to understand an Oasis-class ship layout nicely. 

 

If I told my Mom I was going to "break things down to a simplified menu of choices", she would bop me aside the head and ask me what was wrong with me and tell me she was going to water aerobics!  Allure is a great ship for all ages, if the OP is bringing seniors with mobility issues, bringing a wheelchair to take them around might make it easier for them.  I would suggest cabins near the aft elevator banks as they are closer to more things.  I would suggest either deck 6, which is where the Boardwalk is, or deck 8, which is where Central Park is.  Schedule your shows in advance, especially the comedy club, but then be flexible.  They open seating to shows about fifteen minutes prior to showtime, so you can always try the standby line.  Don't try to do it all and don't try to do it all together.  

 

 

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Thank you for all of the replies!  They have been very helpful.

 

It does sound like Allure could be very manageable, provided we do some advance planning.  At the very least, there should be one senior with a walker, and a different senior who already needs help with menu choices, so a summarized menu on the ship would help.

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, MississippiMom said:

Thank you for all of the replies!  They have been very helpful.

 

It does sound like Allure could be very manageable, provided we do some advance planning.  At the very least, there should be one senior with a walker, and a different senior who already needs help with menu choices, so a summarized menu on the ship would help.

Mobility issues will make it a slight challenge, but well worth the effort. Get a cabin near the elevators, it can be a very long walk.  If you can manage late dining MDR would be less crowded and no hurry to finish up. We did a family cruise on Oasis and our granddaughter who was 12 at the time spent most of her waking hours in the kids club the climbing wall or on the flowrider, if I remember right she also had kids club dinner several nights and loved it. We are in our 70s and Oasis Class is now our favorite.  You will find the ship feels far less crowded than other smaller ships. You will also find there are many many older couples. Getting on and off the ship at various ports is a breeze, those with mobility issues have no problem jumping to the front of the line. Allure is a great choice, happy cruising

Edited by taglovestocruise

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IMO Allure is the perfect multigenerational ship.  She is one of my favorites which I have sailed more than any other in the fleet, and I'm a retiree.  Old, young, and in between - something for all!

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It is a great ship for families of all ages.    The aqua theater is something all ages will love.    The ice skating show is also great for families.     Just make sure to make your show reservations early (best to book online when available).     I am sure your family will have a wonderful time exploring the ship and will probably have to sail her again to enjoy everything.    If you have never been to CocoCay your family will love it there too!

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2 hours ago, MississippiMom said:

  At the very least, there should be one senior with a walker, and a different senior who already needs help with menu choices, so a summarized menu on the ship would help.

A few weeks before the actual cruise, the nightly menus will appear on the Royal Caribbean app.  It is easy to look at the menus. For the one needing help with the menu he/she will  be able to determine in advance or at least have some idea of what to have for dinner when onboard by having looked at the menus prior to boarding.

 

I would also recommend getting a cabin as close to an elevator as possible.  For young people walking from a cabin from the aft of the ship, to the aft elevator, is an easy walk, but for those of us who are older, it seems like a long walk.  We had a balcony cabin that was second from the aft and we liked to go to the cabin a few times a day.  The walk seemed like it was forever and we ended up not going to the cabin as often as we wished.

 

Making reservations for the shows is important and it is also important to be to the show location about half an hour in advance in you want seats together.  About fifteen minutes before the shows start, non-reservation people are admitted and it's not always possible to find seats together.

 

With a bit of planning, I'm sure the vacation will be a great one for all of you.

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Meals in the main dining room are featured on a menu board at the entrance of the dining room every day so you will know in advance what the offerings will be for dinner .

Getting a cabin near the middle of the ship is probably a good idea for the seniors .

Oasis class is the only ships we will sail on .

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Its really an easy ship tp get around on. Easier than some of the smaller ships. The shows are all wonderful. I think you will all love her, and you might be saying after the cruise "I won't go back to a small ship again".

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I'll never understand the discussion of "will someone like it" by asking a bunch of random strangers.

 

Why not ask the person if they are interested in it? If inviting a bunch of people, chances are someone is going to have complaints. It's best to focus on the majority in the end.

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10 hours ago, MississippiMom said:

 

We are booked on the Allure for Jan 3rd.  We booked it because it was about to get the upgrades that the Oasis did.  Unfortunately Covid killed the renovations 😞  Something to think about if you are wanting the escape room/slides/etc.

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So, I just did a search on how long the Oasis and Vision are.  Oasis is 1188 feet long and Vision is 915.  So, if you book near the elevators the walks to anywhere are not particularly that much longer since you rarely walk all the way to the tips of the ships as many venues are relatively in the middle.  The difference between the Oasis class and the other classes is the width, since they a lot wider, but to reach most activities the difference between ships because of the design is not that much harder.

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17 minutes ago, xpcdoojk said:

So, I just did a search on how long the Oasis and Vision are.  Oasis is 1188 feet long and Vision is 915.  So, if you book near the elevators the walks to anywhere are not particularly that much longer since you rarely walk all the way to the tips of the ships as many venues are relatively in the middle.  The difference between the Oasis class and the other classes is the width, since they a lot wider, but to reach most activities the difference between ships because of the design is not that much harder.

 

I've always understood the Quantum ships to be the ones with the most walking

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