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Del Rio states it will take at least 60 days to get a ship ready


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And RCL follows NCL's lead:

At Royal Caribbean International, our guests and crew's safety and well-being are always our top priorities. After further consulting with our partners at Cruise Lines International Association and in conjunction with the CDC, we have decided to extend the suspension of sailings for our global fleet for all sailings through November 30th, 2020.

https://www.royalcaribbean.com/cruise-ships/itinerary-updates

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3 minutes ago, oteixeira said:

NCL Joy also sailing towards Philippines reportedly to pick up crew.  Riley Trench (RCL employee in Asia) reported he will be back to work "Very soon" on twitter today.  Basically, the calls are going out, there are multiple reports of it.

I agree. I read today they will do short 3/4 day test cruises with employees only to try out protocols and get ships ready for cruising in the US. Can’t wait to see how it goes. We have to start somewhere.

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1 hour ago, disneykins said:

Could the cruise lines get around the CDC ban by sailing out of another port, lets say Nassau? Do 3 and 4 day cruises to other Bahamas islands and return to Nassau. I know its not convenient for Florida dwellers but the rest of us have to fly to the departure port all the time so this would be no problem. Maybe Nassau cant handle the crowds for embarkation, but only a few ships, half full, with restrictions, might be able to do it. What about another island? I think P&O cruises the Caribbean without going to a US port, why cant NCL? It might light a fire under Florida government that they could lose business? I just want to cruise in spring but if they don't get going soon, it ain't gonna happen, lol.

Tony

 

 I think the bigger problem with this is the market. 3-4 days cruises are successful out of the US, and I think they are primarily popular with people who live near a port. I certainly wouldn't fly all the way to Florida for 3 day cruise just like I wouldn't fly all the way to Nassau for a 3 day cruise. The airfare would be more than the cruise price!

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27 minutes ago, oteixeira said:

NCL Joy also sailing towards Philippines reportedly to pick up crew.  Riley Trench (RCL employee in Asia) reported he will be back to work "Very soon" on twitter today.  Basically, the calls are going out, there are multiple reports of it.

 

Can you please link to where NCL has actually reported that the Joy is heading to pick up crew? It does make sense, but there are so many rumors I like to see the source whenever possible. 

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29 minutes ago, oteixeira said:

And RCL follows NCL's lead:

At Royal Caribbean International, our guests and crew's safety and well-being are always our top priorities. After further consulting with our partners at Cruise Lines International Association and in conjunction with the CDC, we have decided to extend the suspension of sailings for our global fleet for all sailings through November 30th, 2020.

https://www.royalcaribbean.com/cruise-ships/itinerary-updates

 

And Seabourn just cancelled three additional ships into 2021. Heck, they canceled the Seabourn Encore until May 28th of 2021!! 

 

https://www.cruiseindustrynews.com/cruise-news/23622-seabourn-cancels-cruises-for-odyssey-ovation-and-encore.html

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6 hours ago, BermudaBound2014 said:

I thought this article was interesting because I've read 30 days to be ready in other posts. It seems that RCL is calling back staff in Florida and will start with  3 day sailings to Cocoa Cay once they get the ok from CDC.  I'm wondering if anyone has heard whether or not NCL is calling back staff and crew yet? If they started readying a ship today it seems they could to very limited sailing in December, but if they aren't starting to bring back crew and install the technology needed, it's not looking good for 2020.

 

https://www.cruiseindustrynews.com/cruise-news/23616-del-rio-at-least-60-days-to-get-a-cruise-ship-ready.html

 

 

They could think they could start, till they really sail it is all wishful thinking.

 

I want to cruise as badly as many, but currently not planning any cruising, that is simply not smart vacationing.  Rubbing sholders with thousands in closed areas ( theater, pools, buffets, bars, dining rooms, elevators, etc. etc. ) for days with recirculated air... yeah how stupid do you think I am, mask or not, LOL

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Exactly my question???   Mr. Del Rio said Friday in a email to all officers and crew that Norwegian did NOT know when cruises would be able to resume.  I have seen the email.  It was sent to me by a crew member that should have not shared it.  Mr.  Del Rio went on to say that crew members would be contacted by the agencies or shoreside departments.  He also mention that due to the restrictions in many countries crew may not be allowed to leave or enter.  He did say that there is some small movement of crew as relief crews.  

 

I would believe 60 days or more to bring even one ship on line.

 

Will be a long process no matter what date or dates for the CDC "No Sail" order.  I would not be surprised to see it extended into 2021.

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I've said all along that it would take 4-6 weeks, minimum, to restart, and that travel restrictions in home countries and countries where the lines are trying to crew up, will lengthen that time frame.  As noted, there is a worldwide crisis in countries not allowing crew changes to happen, there are over 300,000 crew on merchant ships that cannot get off, and about the same number at home awaiting the opportunity to get back to the ship.  That number is over 3 times the number of total cruise ship crew (both working and on vacation in normal times), so there will be need for either charter flights or ships picking up crew at ports that allow crew (those that can leave their countries) changes without restrictions.

 

If RCI is planning on making some trial runs with just crew (and as noted they will not have an easy time getting crew to the ships), then they must have a detailed action plan to operate under, which would have to have been developed from the Healthy Sail board report (as this was not detailed enough to be an action plan), and I wonder why this action plan has not been submitted to the CDC, with public notification, given the media surrounding the Healthy Sail report.  My guess is that while many of the onboard protocols can be set up, and practiced, the main sticking point, and one even the Healthy Sail report supports is the setting of contracts with private health care providers, private general and medical transportation services, and private quarantine facilities, and that without these actual contracted facilities and services, the cruise lines cannot submit action plans to the CDC, and without those action plans, they won't get cleared to restart.

 

Another feeling I have, is that based on the "request for information" that the CDC held, they are looking at changing federal regulations, regarding the health clearance of ships, to make the requirements of the no sail order permanent.

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1 hour ago, chipmaster said:

 

They could think they could start, till they really sail it is all wishful thinking.

 

I want to cruise as badly as many, but currently not planning any cruising, that is simply not smart vacationing.  Rubbing sholders with thousands in closed areas ( theater, pools, buffets, bars, dining rooms, elevators, etc. etc. ) for days with recirculated air... yeah how stupid do you think I am, mask or not, LOL


So, are you no longer doing 380k air miles/year? 

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1 hour ago, chengkp75 said:

I've said all along that it would take 4-6 weeks, minimum, to restart, and that travel restrictions in home countries and countries where the lines are trying to crew up, will lengthen that time frame.  As noted, there is a worldwide crisis in countries not allowing crew changes to happen, there are over 300,000 crew on merchant ships that cannot get off, and about the same number at home awaiting the opportunity to get back to the ship.  That number is over 3 times the number of total cruise ship crew (both working and on vacation in normal times), so there will be need for either charter flights or ships picking up crew at ports that allow crew (those that can leave their countries) changes without restrictions.

 

If RCI is planning on making some trial runs with just crew (and as noted they will not have an easy time getting crew to the ships), then they must have a detailed action plan to operate under, which would have to have been developed from the Healthy Sail board report (as this was not detailed enough to be an action plan), and I wonder why this action plan has not been submitted to the CDC, with public notification, given the media surrounding the Healthy Sail report.  My guess is that while many of the onboard protocols can be set up, and practiced, the main sticking point, and one even the Healthy Sail report supports is the setting of contracts with private health care providers, private general and medical transportation services, and private quarantine facilities, and that without these actual contracted facilities and services, the cruise lines cannot submit action plans to the CDC, and without those action plans, they won't get cleared to restart.

 

Another feeling I have, is that based on the "request for information" that the CDC held, they are looking at changing federal regulations, regarding the health clearance of ships, to make the requirements of the no sail order permanent.

Thank You as always for insight.

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4 hours ago, sanger727 said:

 

 I think the bigger problem with this is the market. 3-4 days cruises are successful out of the US, and I think they are primarily popular with people who live near a port. I certainly wouldn't fly all the way to Florida for 3 day cruise just like I wouldn't fly all the way to Nassau for a 3 day cruise. The airfare would be more than the cruise price!

 

What would be wrong with taking a B2B or even a B2B to B2B cruise to curtail the cruise fever !

3+3+3+3 = 12 days of cruising should be enough for most anyone's fancy - add more if you want more

see if there is another itinerary available -

Gotta get me cruise fix - enough of this quarantine stay in place stuff (all things considered safe !) 

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3 hours ago, chengkp75 said:

/s/

/s/

Since all the cruise lines are basically (pardon expression) in the same boat (ship)

Possible for RCI - Carnival and NCL crews to ride on competitive accommodations

to get things going - I'll ferry your crew to their port assignment and you ferry mine

to theirs -or- just maybe do a transfer at sea where there would be no restrictions.

 

Just thinking of solutions to get cruising back to where it will benefit crews and customers.

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lol @don't-use-real-name I was considering asking a similar question!  I was curious if the cruise ships could be used as an isolation for merchant mariners trying to get to where they need to be, to limit contact with others outside the "bubble" of mariners.  Of course, I'm sure the cruise lines would want some compensation, and it's certainly not the fastest way to accomplish the goal of getting people around the world.

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4 hours ago, Carpe-Diem said:


So, are you no longer doing 380k air miles/year? 

Sadly stopped mid March, my10 year visa needs to be renewed, 14 day mandatory quarantine is less than ideal.

 

UA did start flights again between SFO-PVG, they used to have three flights a day from west coast, how far has business travel/consulting fallen.    

 

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8 hours ago, hallux said:

lol @don't-use-real-name I was considering asking a similar question!  I was curious if the cruise ships could be used as an isolation for merchant mariners trying to get to where they need to be, to limit contact with others outside the "bubble" of mariners.  Of course, I'm sure the cruise lines would want some compensation, and it's certainly not the fastest way to accomplish the goal of getting people around the world.

The problem outside the cruise industry is that you are dropping off one or two crew at a port one day from a ship, then one or two a couple days later from another ship, and this goes on all around the globe, and at ports where cruise ships don't call.  Nice thought, but not practical.

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On 10/6/2020 at 11:41 AM, ColeThornton said:

As a reminder the Star, Spirit and Dawn are out of commission through March, 2021.

 

We were  booked on the Spirit out of Athens in Dec 2020.  (cue sad music).

It's a smaller ship than the Epic which is in the Med now, and I can't help but wonder if size is part of the decision.  That is, smaller ship has less ability to distance crew, no matter what they do for passengers.

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On 10/6/2020 at 9:04 PM, hallux said:

 

I don't think Nassau has the infrastructure to support this.  While the airport has the facility for immigration and customs (for Atlantis), the port just didn't seem like it could handle boarding or disembarking a ship.  There is quite a bit of infrastructure at the US ports for this - forklifts, boom lifts, baggage cages, the longshoremen (and women) in general, the terminal building, etc.

 

One issue with sailing without any US port stops would be provisioning.  If the cruise line has been sailing with provisioning ports only in the US, they would need to set up a supply line at one of the port stops.  This poses an additional problem if the ports are not set up for provisioning (the aforementioned forklifts and boom lifts).

 

what about San Juan? I do have in mind that some ships do have San Juan as main ebarkation/disembarkation port.It is reachable rather easily by plne from the US-mainland as well.

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19 minutes ago, CruiseMH said:

 

what about San Juan? I do have in mind that some ships do have San Juan as main ebarkation/disembarkation port.It is reachable rather easily by plne from the US-mainland as well.

As Puerto Rico is part of the US, it falls under the CDC no sail order.

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