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Lynn was a little confused when she saw the hot cross buns at one of our supermarkets. We have an excellent recipe for Christmas pudding but for us 1 batch is about a 10 year supply. My mom used to make it and seal it in jars. We haven't had any in some years now and I'm afraid that whatever I may manage to produce will not live up the "how Mom made it" memory. Funny how you would rather do without than try to live up to a fond memory.

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3 hours ago, Blackduck59 said:

Lynn was a little confused when she saw the hot cross buns at one of our supermarkets. We have an excellent recipe for Christmas pudding but for us 1 batch is about a 10 year supply. My mom used to make it and seal it in jars. We haven't had any in some years now and I'm afraid that whatever I may manage to produce will not live up the "how Mom made it" memory. Funny how you would rather do without than try to live up to a fond memory.

My grandmother (British) made hers in a pudding bowl with lid, whilst my MIL (German) made hers in a rag each November and hung them up under the house.  Both were delicious hot on Christmas Day and leftovers cold on Boxing Day.  I hadn't heard of plum puddings sealed in jars. 

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1 hour ago, MMDown Under said:

My grandmother (British) made hers in a pudding bowl with lid, whilst my MIL (German) made hers in a rag each November and hung them up under the house.  Both were delicious hot on Christmas Day and leftovers cold on Boxing Day.  I hadn't heard of plum puddings sealed in jars. 

Marion, I make my plum puddings in oven bags. So easy to do. We had the larger of the three I made from one mixture yesterday and there were easily  8-10 servings. I gave one pudding to my parents which served 4 yesterday and there's another small one left which we will eat over the next few days. 

 

Leigh

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1 hour ago, MMDown Under said:

My grandmother (British) made hers in a pudding bowl with lid, whilst my MIL (German) made hers in a rag each November and hung them up under the house.  Both were delicious hot on Christmas Day and leftovers cold on Boxing Day.  I hadn't heard of plum puddings sealed in jars. 

My wife made the puddings, boiled and tied up in calico bags, month before Christmas, also gf one for me, no flour, well rice flour, jubbly.

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2 hours ago, possum52 said:

Marion, I make my plum puddings in oven bags. So easy to do. We had the larger of the three I made from one mixture yesterday and there were easily  8-10 servings. I gave one pudding to my parents which served 4 yesterday and there's another small one left which we will eat over the next few days. 

Leigh

Is that in plastic oven bags, Leigh?

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Growing up, my Nanna lived with us so every year she would make the Xmas pud, from the ground up and add the old "sterling" coins.  The 2 bobs, shillings, sixpences and threepences.  We all had to have a stir of the pudding mix and make a wish ... don't tell your wish!  Then she would wrap it up in calico and hang it on a hook in the washhouse.  LOL we weren't posh, we didn't have a laundry room, we just had a washhouse.  Copper pot with fireplace under it and a couple of concrete troughs.

 

We also had chooks which on Xmas Eve my Dad would catch a likely one, chop it's head off on the chopping block then proceed to the concrete trough and cold-water pluck it.  Which I loved watching as a little one and trying to help.  Memories, right?  But, then he would have to clean out the innards.  OMG, that's when I ran inside because I couldn't stand the stink.  But on the day, Dad would wrap the chook (after it had been stuffed!) in one of his brown paper beer bags and tie it up with string then onto a baking dish and into the Kooka oven and basted with 'dripping', etc., etc.  And vegies and all the other Xmas dinner stuff.

 

Then Nanna would have her pudding boiling for ages then bring it out.  She would untie it and turn it out onto an enamel plate and yell .... "It's a blooooody failure!!!!!!" 

 

Of course it wasn't, it was always perfect.  So that became the running joke and even today if I cook a pudding, when I turn it out ..... "It's a bloooooody failure!"  Nanna, Dad and Mum are long gone but at this time of the year I yearn for them still to be here.  We didn't have much back then, but we were always well fed and by golly, did we have fun and laughter and wonderful memories to keep forever.

 

Thank you Nanna, thank you Dad for those wonderful Xmas memories!

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1 hour ago, LC1950 said:

Growing up, my Nanna lived with us so every year she would make the Xmas pud, from the ground up and add the old "sterling" coins.  The 2 bobs, shillings, sixpences and threepences.  We all had to have a stir of the pudding mix and make a wish ... don't tell your wish!  Then she would wrap it up in calico and hang it on a hook in the washhouse.  LOL we weren't posh, we didn't have a laundry room, we just had a washhouse.  Copper pot with fireplace under it and a couple of concrete troughs.

 

We also had chooks which on Xmas Eve my Dad would catch a likely one, chop it's head off on the chopping block then proceed to the concrete trough and cold-water pluck it.  Which I loved watching as a little one and trying to help.  Memories, right?  But, then he would have to clean out the innards.  OMG, that's when I ran inside because I couldn't stand the stink.  But on the day, Dad would wrap the chook (after it had been stuffed!) in one of his brown paper beer bags and tie it up with string then onto a baking dish and into the Kooka oven and basted with 'dripping', etc., etc.  And vegies and all the other Xmas dinner stuff.

 

Then Nanna would have her pudding boiling for ages then bring it out.  She would untie it and turn it out onto an enamel plate and yell .... "It's a blooooody failure!!!!!!" 

 

Of course it wasn't, it was always perfect.  So that became the running joke and even today if I cook a pudding, when I turn it out ..... "It's a bloooooody failure!"  Nanna, Dad and Mum are long gone but at this time of the year I yearn for them still to be here.  We didn't have much back then, but we were always well fed and by golly, did we have fun and laughter and wonderful memories to keep forever.

 

Thank you Nanna, thank you Dad for those wonderful Xmas memories!

That's a beautiful story of recollections. Thanks for telling us.

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On 12/26/2020 at 7:51 PM, LC1950 said:

Growing up, my Nanna lived with us so every year she would make the Xmas pud, from the ground up and add the old "sterling" coins.  The 2 bobs, shillings, sixpences and threepences.  We all had to have a stir of the pudding mix and make a wish ... don't tell your wish!  Then she would wrap it up in calico and hang it on a hook in the washhouse.  LOL we weren't posh, we didn't have a laundry room, we just had a washhouse.  Copper pot with fireplace under it and a couple of concrete troughs.

 

We also had chooks which on Xmas Eve my Dad would catch a likely one, chop it's head off on the chopping block then proceed to the concrete trough and cold-water pluck it.  Which I loved watching as a little one and trying to help.  Memories, right?  But, then he would have to clean out the innards.  OMG, that's when I ran inside because I couldn't stand the stink.  But on the day, Dad would wrap the chook (after it had been stuffed!) in one of his brown paper beer bags and tie it up with string then onto a baking dish and into the Kooka oven and basted with 'dripping', etc., etc.  And vegies and all the other Xmas dinner stuff.

 

Then Nanna would have her pudding boiling for ages then bring it out.  She would untie it and turn it out onto an enamel plate and yell .... "It's a blooooody failure!!!!!!" 

 

Of course it wasn't, it was always perfect.  So that became the running joke and even today if I cook a pudding, when I turn it out ..... "It's a bloooooody failure!"  Nanna, Dad and Mum are long gone but at this time of the year I yearn for them still to be here.  We didn't have much back then, but we were always well fed and by golly, did we have fun and laughter and wonderful memories to keep forever.

 

Thank you Nanna, thank you Dad for those wonderful Xmas memories!

Thanks for sharing your wonderful Christmas memories.  Like you, our family weren't well off (no one we knew was) however we ate like kings, with all cooked food home made and absolutely delicious.  As Lyle said some were so good I never attempted them, such as Christmas pudding in a rag.  With Queensland high houses, the puddings got hung under the house.  We kept 3d to continue putting in the Christmas puddings.  And yes, there was always someone who "choked" on a 3d!  My memories of Christmas are lots of laughter.  My first married Christmas, I invited my husband's country grandparents who never came to the city.  I went to an unbelievable amount of trouble cooking a traditional hot Christmas dinner.  It was one of those really hot Christmases, so no-one wanted any food, except for desert of a cold watermelon scooped out and full of cold tropical fruits.  My FIL hosed the roof!  I filled  washing basins with cold water for the women to put their feet in.  I also hung wet towels with a fan blowing on high behind.   My Grandmother in Law opened all the buttons down the front of her dress, whilst my grandmother looked shocked!  Christmas in Old before air con!

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34 minutes ago, MMDown Under said:

Thanks Leigh.  It fascinates me that you could cook plum puddings in a bag!

That's how it was commonly done. My grandfather was a baker in Albury and he made Christmas puddings each year for each of his six children (and their families except for a son who was living in Canada). They were made many months before Christmas and were peppered with 3d, 6d and 1/- (trey bits, zacks and dinars). When cooked, the puddings, in their calico bags, were hung from the roof inside the outside laundry (which was also the bathroom)  which contained  a chip heater for the bath and a wood fired copper - no washing machine.  Nanna's kitchen had a wood stove (never bothered updating to an electric range). Every morning Nanna was first up early to light the stove for the day.

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2 minutes ago, lyndarra said:

That's how it was commonly done. My grandfather was a baker in Albury and he made Christmas puddings each year for each of his six children (and their families except for a son who was living in Canada). They were made many months before Christmas and were peppered with 3d, 6d and 1/- (trey bits, zacks and dinars). When cooked, the puddings, in their calico bags, were hung from the roof inside the outside laundry (which was also the bathroom)  which contained  a chip heater for the bath and a wood fired copper - no washing machine.  Nanna's kitchen had a wood stove (never bothered updating to an electric range). Every morning Nanna was first up early to light the stove for the day.

Leigh cooks her plum puddings in a Glad polyester bag.  My MIL cooked her plum pudding in a calico rag, which she washed and used each year.  Like your grandfather, they were cooked months before Christmas.  Wood fired copper kept outside was used for washing, as well as cooking crabs.  

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I got one of these, not bad, plenty of fruit and moist, with plenty of custard, cream and ice cream, I like all that together on the pudding.

GlutenFreeChristmasPudding-768x509.jpg.d208d255b92fbfda88cf2ae781ab6a03.jpg

Edited by NSWP
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On 12/26/2020 at 8:18 PM, MMDown Under said:

Did your wife hang them up under the house?  Lucky you!

No, in the laundry. Plenty of rum and brandy to improve the taste and preserve the fruit. The fruit, sultanas etc were always soaked in spirit, pre mixing,

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12 minutes ago, NSWP said:

I got one of these, not bad, plenty of fruit and moist, with plenty of custard, cream and ice cream, I like all that together on the pudding.

GlutenFreeChristmasPudding-768x509.jpg.d208d255b92fbfda88cf2ae781ab6a03.jpg

I was looking for something like that, as I got one at a Christmas function last year and it was surprisingly good.  Do you make your custard or heat your bought custard?  I like custard on plum pudding.  Custard, cream and ice-cream - now that is luxury!

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