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Come sail with me on a virtual cruise to Hawaii on Ruby Princess


ellie1145
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7 hours ago, AF-1 said:

cr8tiv1:  I spoke with a taxi driver on Hawaii.  He told me that every December he would drive his pickup truck up to Mauna Kea and fill the truck bed with snow;  and drive it back down to let his grandkids make snowman.  How cool is that.

 

Wow that is some granddad. Bet those children adore him! 🙂

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2 hours ago, CruzinNoony said:

 

Not azbirdmom, but the whale watching in Maui is amazing from Dec. through April, but best in Jan and Feb.  There are so many, it is like "whale soup".  We are going again next Jan and can't wait to see our "friends".

 

Thank you, CruzinNoony. I had no idea about the whales. What an amazing sight that must be. What is the weather like at that time of year? 

 

Would love to see the whales one day. It’s now on my ever lengthening bucket list! 😉

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10 minutes ago, ellie1145 said:

 

Thank you, CruzinNoony. I had no idea about the whales. What an amazing sight that must be. What is the weather like at that time of year? 

 

Would love to see the whales one day. It’s now on my ever lengthening bucket list! 😉

The weather is pretty much the same year round. 70-80s most days, breeze every day, rain in the AM most days and occasionally rain all day.

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2 hours ago, TeaBag said:

Thank you a million times, Ellie for your history of the lighthouse.  I didn't know all this.  Shame on them for not rewarding that poor man for his diligence.  I read it out to DH and he was very impressed with your writing.  You got a great picture of the timeshare building with the low 3 story building in front.   That is TS units also.  I so enjoyed all the pictures of the lighthouse as we go down there when there's a cruise ship leaving and wave like fools at the folks sailing away!  It's always a highlight for us.  We must be simple souls.  It will be 2 years from now till we are back there.

 

So glad you enjoyed my little story. I love to find out as much as I can about places and people. It just adds to my enjoyment of new places.

 

It is a beautiful lighthouse and gave me lots of opportunities for taking photos, which as you know, is a bit of an obsession! 😉

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Posted (edited)

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Alongside the lighthouse is the airport, which is served by several airlines, including Hawaiian Airlines. In 2017 it had an average of 355 flights per day. It has two runways, both measuring 6,500 ft by 64 ft. As we sail past the airport several planes can be seen landing landing and taking off.

 

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Poor Manuel Souza, whose plea for a pay rise was ignored, was followed as keeper of the light by James McLaughlin in 1904. Whilst living on this isolated and barren point, James began to transform the landscape around the lighthouse. He planted numerous trees around his cottage.

 

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In 1909 he was visited by a young lady who noticed an interesting rock formation which the wind and water had carved into the profile of a man’s head. James had never noticed this before but decided to paint features onto the man so that it would be more obvious. This rock formation was even given a name - Jack.

 

One of the longest serving lighthouse keepers was Oliver Kua, who took care of the light for 22 years, between 1917-1939.

 

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During his time maintaining this very important high powered light, a new house was built for him in 1932. What a lonely life it must have been for him and his family.

 

Sadly, there is evidence of grafitti, even in this remote place. 

 

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Huge waves crash onto the rocks below the lighthouse.

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We sail past a sandy cove.

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A vehicle sits at the end of the runway.

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A final glimpse of the island as it recedes into the mist.

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Edited by ellie1145
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On 4/28/2021 at 3:19 PM, ellie1145 said:

 

I wonder if you would share with us why it is your favourite island, azbirdmom? I would love to return and would value your input when we finally reach the island. 

 

Well for starters it was where we honeymooned.  We started spending every anniversary there as well, then we started with another second trip in whale season to see these magnificent creatures which you can often do walking down the shore or even while sipping wine or dining on the lanai.  It was always such a calming place and we would read a lot while sitting under a grove of plumeria trees, occasionally taking a dip into the ocean to bob and cool off.  When I was working it just meant relaxation and there's so much beauty there.

 

Our twice a year trips continued until 2008 when we decided to book a cruise and got hooked on that.  It's been tough to get hubby to return to Maui when there are other places in the world to enjoy.  We've only been back twice since then and I sure miss it.  I was just thinking of landing in the airport in Kahului and that feeling of seeing Haleakala and the shore below.  And driving away in our rental car playing Iz on the CD player (or now it would be on our phones).  It just always got us in the mood for a laid back, wonderful vacation.  Oh boy do I need a return trip.

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Going a little ‘off piste’....... Lest We Forget...

 

This morning, DH and I had our second vaccinations. It was great to feel that we had come this far, and even better to see the number of people turning up for their first or second jabs.

 

But as we walked back to our car we noticed something we’d never seen before, and I hope you will forgive me for deviating just a little. 

 

Our vaccination centre is in a Town Hall/Festival Theatre/Memorial Hall, in a little market town called Petersfield in Hampshire, and we noticed this unprepossessing memorial tucked away in a corner of the car park. I mention it because it shows the  close links which we British had with the armed forces of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the USA.

 

In 1941, a lady called Kathleen Money-Chappelle conceived the idea for a special canteen for the many servicemen who thronged the town looking for a place to relax. Thus an appeal was made for funds which resulted in the building of the ‘Home From Home United Services Canteen and Social Club.’

 

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The official opening ceremony in August,1941.

 

Specially inscribed commemorative stones were laid by representatives of all the fighting services, including those from the Commonwealth. 

 

 

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This Canteen went from strength to strength and fundraising locally led to the building of a billiards room, a library and a quiet room. Regular local entertainment was offered such as dances, dance bands, ukulele players, concert parties, lectures, musical recitals, magicians, comedy and community singing. 

 

A full cafeteria service was offered, with hot meals, drinks and snacks, often prepared and served by volunteers. All profits went back into the canteen to provide more facilities for the troops. The Canteen was open from 10.00 am until 10.00 pm and must have been a welcome retreat for many who were far from home. Indeed, there were numerous items provided to help these visiting servicemen feel at home, such as magazines and newspapers like the New Yorker or Toronto Daily Star. 

 

As the war stretched on, Hampshire became flooded with troops, and as D-Day approached there was a huge increase in men and armaments, as Portsmouth and the local area was a major embarkation point for the Normandy Landings in June 1944. 

 

One can imagine the little streets of Petersfield being full of a seemingly endless stream of troops from all over the world. I am sure that these men would remember the wartime spirit that abounded, and the feeling of kindness and warmth which emanated from the local people who welcomed them, offered them succour and sent them on their way. Some never to return. 

 

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Thus it was that this little market town became a stopping point for military en route from London to Portsmouth, serving British, Canadian, French, Czech, Polish, and later, American troops. By September 1944 it had served over a million meals, and in the week leading up to D-Day they provided 15,000 meals to hundreds of troops passing through the town 

 

Standing looking at this small and unimposing memorial reminds me of our close links with so many countries, and that thanks to the power of the internet, and a site such as Cruise Critic, I can communicate and connect with so many people across the oceans.

 

Who knows, perhaps someone reading this will have had a father or grandfather, an uncle or cousin who passed this way back in the Second World War. A soldier or sailor or airman who walked through the streets of Petersfield and found a welcome and a respite from the horrors of war. I certainly hope so.

 

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5 hours ago, azbirdmom said:

 

Well for starters it was where we honeymooned.  We started spending every anniversary there as well, then we started with another second trip in whale season to see these magnificent creatures which you can often do walking down the shore or even while sipping wine or dining on the lanai.  It was always such a calming place and we would read a lot while sitting under a grove of plumeria trees, occasionally taking a dip into the ocean to bob and cool off.  When I was working it just meant relaxation and there's so much beauty there.

 

Our twice a year trips continued until 2008 when we decided to book a cruise and got hooked on that.  It's been tough to get hubby to return to Maui when there are other places in the world to enjoy.  We've only been back twice since then and I sure miss it.  I was just thinking of landing in the airport in Kahului and that feeling of seeing Haleakala and the shore below.  And driving away in our rental car playing Iz on the CD player (or now it would be on our phones).  It just always got us in the mood for a laid back, wonderful vacation.  Oh boy do I need a return trip.

 

Thank you for sharing this, azbirdmom. What a beautiful place to spend your honeymoon, no wonder it holds a special place in your heart. Your descriptions are so vivid. 

 

I hope you get the chance to return one day soon. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, CruzinNoony said:

Ellie, totally off subject, but we just started watching "The Crown".  If you have watched the series, could you share with us if it is fairly factual?  We are really enjoying it.

 

Hi CruisinNoony. Glad to hear that you have been able to start watching ‘The Crown.’ 

 

We have watched the series so far and enjoyed it enormously. It is hugely entertaining, and he quality of the acting and the costumes and sets are remarkable. The portrayal of Princess, Margaret, for example, seems to reflect much of her behaviour at the time. And of course, she was not allowed to marry the love of her life, and this impacted the way she lived and loved. 

 

But, of course, it IS a drama, and although much of it is based on events in the past, we need to remember that it is just that, a drama. The dialogue is clever and riveting but only they know what was really said, and what actually happened behind closed doors. 

 

I think it shows the queen as a woman who has had, and still has, a great sense of duty, a mother who perhaps was unable to show the sort of easy affection to her first two children that her grandchildren show to theirs, and a loving grandmother and great grandmother. I also think that it gives an indication of how Prince Charles suffered at school at Gordonstoun, and how he struggled with his relationships, including those with his wife, Diana, Princess of Wales.

 

One can only surmise what goes on behind the closed doors of the palace, but it certainly is a very entertaining drama and I look forward to watching further episodes. 

 

I wonder if ‘The Crown’ will ever tell the love story of probably our two favourite royals? This week has seen the 10th wedding anniversary of William and Kate, a day we celebrated in America.

 

We were vacationing in Florida at the time and we set our alarms to wake early to see it. We were enthralled, as I know many millions were worldwide. It was a joyous occasion, and one which, despite the crowds and the millions watching, both of them appeared to enjoy to the full, and manage to make it personal.  

 

Over the 10 years they have become a great credit to the monarchy, and show that the future of the monarchy is in safe hands. They have a great sense of duty and dedication to the crown, as was shown by the recent passing of the Duke of Edinburgh. Their immediate reaction was that they will be there to support the Queen with whatever she needs, and in the words of their grandfather, they will ‘just get on with the job.’ 

 

They have managed to produce 3 delightful and well-behaved children and the photos of them taken by their mother are relaxed and very down to earth. In their quiet, unpretentious way they have reached out to people during Covid, and have chosen their charities with care. Their work centres on mental health, and the young, something very close to Kate’s heart.

 

I remember a delightful little episode during Covid when the two of them played bingo remotely with some elderly residents of a care home and were told in no uncertain terms that they were rubbish at it by one of the ladies. With great amusement they vowed to do better next time. 

 

Kate has developed into an amazing mother, wife and future queen. But then William made sure that she had 10 years to learn about what would be required of her, and he supported her every step of the way. He also gave her the opportunity to bail out

 

As a non-royal, Kate must have found it very hard to adapt to the sometimes inexplicable ways of the monarchy, and the British press certainly gave her a hard time. But she responded with good manners, grace, charm and a ready smile. 

 

Yet despite this they have been able to lead as normal a life as is possible when you are second in line to the throne. He was able to be a Helicopter Search and Rescue Pilot in Wales , and later an Air Ambulance pilot. and they enjoyed a fairly normal life. (Incidentally, Williams salary was donated in full to the East Anglian Air Ambulance), 

 

They are given the privacy that they desire by the public and the press because they know what is required of them. As for them feeling trapped, well, you only have to look at the warmth, joy and genuine interest they show as they take part in official duties to know that they have embraced their role in life and the duty that comes with it. 

 

So, CruizinNoony, I hope you continue to enjoy ‘The Crown,’ but as with so many things, take it with a pinch of salt. It is certainly based on fact but with dramatic licence thrown in. 😉

 

P.S. I hope we will be forgiven for going off subject. 🙈

Edited by ellie1145
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That is a great story Ellie;  the united services canteen was a nice respite for the troops.    I tell you what is nice about Hawaii.  Sitting in a lounge listening to the local music; either with  a guitar or ukelele

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Thank you, Ellie, for your wonderful response to my inquiry about The Crown.  We have just watched the 5th episode (the coronation of Queen Elizabeth) and look forward to the next one.  Dh and I read the synopsis that is online and it really helps to understand who is who.  I also love William and Kate and those adorable children.   

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On 5/1/2021 at 1:46 PM, AF-1 said:

That is a great story Ellie;  the united services canteen was a nice respite for the troops.    I tell you what is nice about Hawaii.  Sitting in a lounge listening to the local music; either with  a guitar or ukelele

 

 

Glad.you enjoyed it, AF-1. 

 

Sounds like a great way to spend time in Hawaii. 👍

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On 5/1/2021 at 5:48 PM, CruzinNoony said:

Thank you, Ellie, for your wonderful response to my inquiry about The Crown.  We have just watched the 5th episode (the coronation of Queen Elizabeth) and look forward to the next one.  Dh and I read the synopsis that is online and it really helps to understand who is who.  I also love William and Kate and those adorable children.   

 

Thank you, CruzinNoony. Glad you are still enjoying the series. It really is fascinating even for someone who lives in the UK. There is so much more to the monarchy than living in palaces and wearing tiaras. 

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As Ruby Princess sails into the sunset, on her way to Maui, I would like to share a few more photos of one of my favourite places in Hawaii, the stunning

Kalalau Lookout.

 

Its very remoteness, the spectacular rock formations and the turquoise and azure sea far below remain in my memory to this day. 

 

These photos were taken on my phone.

 

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Well, Cruising Adventurers and Time Travellers! 

How about a brief detour, and a trip in my Tardis? 

 

I know that many of you are disappointed at having had cruises to the UK cancelled, and so far it seems that only Brits will be allowed to cruise round the British Isles, so perhaps I can be forgiven for taking you on a spectacular walk through the British countryside, on a glorious spring day. 

 

So grab a coat, a hat, some gloves, and a pair of sturdy walking shoes and join me in the Tardis.

 

 

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3 hours ago, ellie1145 said:

Well, Cruising Adventurers and Time Travellers! 

How about a brief detour, and a trip in my Tardis? 

 

I know that many of you are disappointed at having had cruises to the UK cancelled, and so far it seems that only Brits will be allowed to cruise round the British Isles, so perhaps I can be forgiven for taking you on a spectacular walk through the British countryside, on a glorious spring day. 

 

So grab a coat, a hat, some gloves, and a pair of sturdy walking shoes and join me in the Tardis.

 

 

Ellie your wonderful! So happy to read your posts! Hope u r well!

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Ready? Well, hang onto your hats, off we go!

 

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It’s a beautiful spring day, which has followed a wild and stormy night, with high winds and heavy rain. But this morning all is calm, and despite a forecast of more rain the sun is shining. But it’s still quite chilly, although the sun provides some warmth.

 

Spring is a beautiful time, but this year everything seems to be delayed. The trees are only just coming into bud, with new green leaves emerging slowly.

 

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But today I am going to take you for a walk through the bluebell woods near Chichester, in Sussex, on the south coast, a few miles from where we live, where there is a National Nature Reserve.

 

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This annual extravaganza of flowers is truly spectacular this year, and I’d love to share it with you.

 

We park the Tardis and walk along a country lane, spying a beautiful Rectory in the distance. The Church of England has some spectacularly beautiful and historic building which are used for the clergy and this is certainly stunning, with sweeping lawns. 

 

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It’s a beautiful spring day, which has followed a wild and stormy night, with high winds and heavy rain. But this morning all is calm, and, despite a forecast of more rain, the sun is shining. The only sign of the preceding storm is the wind, and although we are sheltered by the trees, we can hear it blowing high up through the bare branches, which clack together with each gust. 

 

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A glimpse of what is to come.

 

Spring is a beautiful time, but this year everything seems to be delayed. The trees are only just coming into bud, with new green leaves emerging slowly. But today I am going to take you for a walk through the bluebell woods near Chichester, in Sussex, on the south coast, a few miles from where we live.

 

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This annual extravaganza of bluebells is truly spectacular this year, and I’d love to share it with you. They come into bloom before the canopy of trees closes in, exposing them to the warm sunlight.

 

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Ahead is the path through the woods, and already we can smell the scent of the bluebells. These wild flowers abound in woods across the UK, but this year they seem particularly abundant.

 

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They grow from bulbs, and produce a single stem on which is a cluster of nodding sweet scented bell-shaped flowers, usually 5-12 flowers, but sometimes up to 30 or more. These beautiful flowers droop at the tip of the stem.

 

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The highly invasive Spanish form of this flower had been introduced over the years and produces a paler flower. Today, these are true bluebells, with a vivid purple hue. They are protected, and may not be dug up and taken away.

 

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Looking through the trees they spread like a glorious violet carpet, as far as the eye can see.

 

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Many apologies, it seems that some of my text in post 1318 has been duplicated, and although I tried to edit it as soon as I noticed it, I was timed out. So sorry. 😒🙁😤 Very frustrating! 

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Thank you for the Springtime photos.  Love the bluebells (although they look purple) that cover the floor of the "forest".  Hawaii has no weather/seasons.  I really do miss springtime.

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DA63428F-BFE4-47A3-8C87-BDEF15129DD6.thumb.jpeg.83904910e85e03b59387c1142198ae8e.jpeg

 

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Peeping out from beneath a bluebell is a Greater Stitchwort, a pretty white star like flower.

 

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A carpet of Lesser Celandine, its bright yellow petals golden in the sunshine.

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Posted (edited)

830F1CD8-BE52-4550-9D94-9E7C55B7C4A0.thumb.jpeg.b03ede6ec730f8b80d5e249bca48408d.jpeg

A white bluebell peeps out among a throng of bluebells. This rare genetic mutation is probably only seen in the proportion of blue to white of 10,000:1

 

Bluebells are also known as ‘fairy flowers’ and it is said that if you pick one you may be led astray or trapped by fairies. I prefer to think that the fairies use the bells as pretty dresses, or maybe hats.

 

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New leaves are emerging.

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Edited by ellie1145
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CBE0FD15-1ABF-4242-8D20-25E85076B4FA.thumb.jpeg.de028e0003d0723fd7f604ca4cfb9012.jpeg

In the trees there are several huts made of branches. We wonder if anyone has used them.

 

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Even the humble dandelion, generally regarded as a weed, offers its golden head up to the sunshine.

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And so ends our brief adventure to see the bluebells of Sussex. I hope you have enjoyed our little tour, and that it will have uplifted you to see the signs of spring at the end of a long and hard Covid winter. Let’s hope the harbingers of Spring foretell a brighter future for all of us, wherever in the world we are.

 

Back in the Tardis we return to Ruby Princess in time for dinner and tonight’s entertainment.

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Ellie      Thank you for the lovely pictures of the Spring flowers , I have been to those woods probably about 5 years ago when I visited my brother in Winchester .

Wonderful memories .

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