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CDC releases Conditional Sailing Order


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The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has dropped its controversial "No Sail" order in favor for a so-called Conditional Sailing Order.

In short, the "No Sail" order has been lifted and the industry will work with the CDC on a realistic, phased-in return to service.

"The initial phases will consist of testing and additional safeguards for crew members," the CDC said in a statement posted to its website .

"CDC will ensure cruise ship operators have adequate health and safety protections for crew while these cruise ship operators build the laboratory capacity needed to test future passengers. Subsequent phases will include simulated voyages to test cruise ship operators’ ability to mitigate COVID-19 risk, certification for ships that meet specific requirements, and a phased return to cruise ship passenger voyages in a manner that mitigates COVID-19 risk among passengers, crew members, and U.S. communities.

"These phases are subject to change based on public health considerations and cruise ship operators’ demonstrated ability to mitigate COVID19 risk. CDC will issue additional orders as needed that will be published in the Federal Register and technical instructions that will be subsequently posted on CDC’s website."

The framework allows for individual cruise lines to progress through phases at variable paces, according to the agency, and enables cruise lines successfully implementing public health measures to return to passenger operations more quickly while others by necessity may move more slowly.

The framework not only encourages cruise lines that are more successful at mitigating the spread of COVID-19 but provides a realistic timeline that anticipates COVID-19 continuing to be present and affecting cruise ship travel, the CDC said.

The phased-in approach will include: (1) establishment of laboratory testing of crew onboard cruise ships in U.S. waters; (2) 15 simulated voyages designed to test a cruise ship operators’ ability to mitigate COVID-19 on cruise ships; (3) a certification process; and (4) a return to passenger voyages in a manner that mitigates the risk of COVID-19 introduction, transmission, or spread among passengers and crew onboard ships and ashore to communities.

These phases will be further determined based on public health considerations including the trajectory of COVID-19 transmission and the demonstrated ability of cruise ship operators to successfully employ measures that mitigate the risk of COVID-19.

As part of the initial crew testing phases, the additionally contains requirements for: (1) shoreside COVID-19 laboratory screening testing of all crew currently onboard; (2) onboard diagnostic testing capabilities for symptomatic travelers (crew and future passengers); (3) shoreside COVID-19 laboratory screening testing of all newly embarking crew; and (4) continued compliance by cruise ship operators with their complete, accurate, and acknowledged No Sail Order Response Plans.

 

https://www.cruiseindustrynews.com/cruise-news/23790-cdc-drops-no-sail-for-framework-for-conditional-sailing-order.html

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1 hour ago, greykitty said:

 

Page 32 of 40 says:

(2) The cruise ship operator must not sail or offer to sail on an itinerary longer than 7 days. CDC may shorten or lengthen the number of days permitted to sail based on public health considerations and as set forth in technical instructions or orders.

 

That pretty much rules out most current itineraries out of Florida in the near term.

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36 minutes ago, Anchorbuoy said:

 

Page 32 of 40 says:

(2) The cruise ship operator must not sail or offer to sail on an itinerary longer than 7 days. CDC may shorten or lengthen the number of days permitted to sail based on public health considerations and as set forth in technical instructions or orders.

 

That pretty much rules out most current itineraries out of Florida in the near term.

 

I may be reading this incorrectly...but I thought the 7-day limit was for "restricted passenger voyages" AKA the "test runs" prior to them getting their certificate.

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1 hour ago, Anchorbuoy said:

 

Page 32 of 40 says:

(2) The cruise ship operator must not sail or offer to sail on an itinerary longer than 7 days. CDC may shorten or lengthen the number of days permitted to sail based on public health considerations and as set forth in technical instructions or orders.

 

That pretty much rules out most current itineraries out of Florida in the near term.

I tend to agree with you, could be sometime before real cruising comes back.

 

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If there is a limitation of 7 days, they could where possible, turn it into a B2B cruise.   Understand that may not always be possible.   Also, not sure what happens if the trip starts in the US and ends in South America.   Is the 7 day restriction still in effect.  Will need to read the document in more detail

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The seven day limit is for initial proof of concept cruises; who knows how long restriction will be in place; maybe a month?  Just guessing.  And this tidbit from the order confirms that cruise lines have all submitted plans (at least that is my reading).

 

Cruise ship operators must continue to follow their cruise lines’ complete, accurate, and acknowledged NSO response plans per the No Sail Order and Suspension of Further Embarkation; Notice of Modification and Extension and Other Measures Related to Operations published at 85 FR 21004 (April 15, 2020) (i.e., “No Sail Order response plan”), as modified and extended July 16, 2020 (published at 85 FR 44085 (July 21, 2020)), and September 30, 2020 (published at 85 FR 62732 (October 5, 2020)).

 

Marc

Edited by mrlevin
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11 minutes ago, mrlevin said:

The seven day limit is for initial proof of concept cruises; who knows how long restriction will be in place; maybe a month?  Just guessing.

 

Marc

 

Do not believe that is correct Marc.  My read is that what you called proof of concept is what the order calls simulated and that the 7 days for restricted cruises not simulated will be the norm until the phased approach moves to unrestricted so the 7 days does not apply to simulated but, to restricted which is thru Nov. 1, 2021 or until it is no longer a pandemic or changed by CDC..

 

Agree the document is a bit unclear but, it only applies to ships currently in US Waters or which will be by Nov. 1, 2021.  Believe it applies ship by ship so each ship has to qualify so with all of the Regent ships outside US waters, it is possible Regent will decide to leave all of their ships outside US waters and thus able to sail now but, unlikely without US customers being able to fly to very many places outside the US.

 

Took reading back and forth to figure out but, the 7 days is only for sailings within US waters and fine for many Caribbean cruises so not really applicable to most Regent cruises.. 

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2 hours ago, Kwaj girl said:

 

I may be reading this incorrectly...but I thought the 7-day limit was for "restricted passenger voyages" AKA the "test runs" prior to them getting their certificate.

 

Simulated Voyages (test runs) are a requirement to receive a Conditional Sailing Certificate (authority to operate).  The Conditional Sailing Certificate restricts operations before, during, and after a revenue cruise.

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1 hour ago, mrlevin said:

The seven day limit is for initial proof of concept cruises; who knows how long restriction will be in place; maybe a month?  Just guessing.  And this tidbit from the order confirms that cruise lines have all submitted plans (at least that is my reading).

 

Marc

 

October 30, 2020 Update:

On October 30, 2020, CDC issued a Framework for Conditional Sailing Order. This Order is effective upon signature and will soon be published in the Federal Register.

This Order shall remain in effect until the earliest of

*The expiration of the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ declaration that COVID-19 constitutes a public health emergency,

*The CDC Director rescinds or modifies the order based on specific public health or other considerations, or

*November 1, 2021

 

https://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/cruise/index.html

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Anchorbuoy,  your last two posts said so much better what I was trying to state just before your posts.  Do want to add that there are several requirements in the latest order requiring actions 30 or 60 days before first Restricted Sailing so will still be next year before any revenue sailings.  Assume there may be Simulated voyages possibly before the end of 2020 but, next year before sailings to of from the US and from the US restricted to no more than 7 days until the order is ended or modified.

 

Lots of actions for the cruise lines and CDC and pretty sure for each ship and not just one ship from each cruise line.

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Just read document and comments.... I agree with last three post regarding regulations. But, I get the feeling, cruising will not go back to any normalcy until  there is a vaccine that is available to to everyone. 
So many of us are older folks and it is not clear whether we will be able to sail in the near future. 

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1 hour ago, Bellaggio Cruisers said:

Just read document and comments.... I agree with last three post regarding regulations. But, I get the feeling, cruising will not go back to any normalcy until  there is a vaccine that is available to to everyone. 
So many of us are older folks and it is not clear whether we will be able to sail in the near future. 

 

From what I read, those with pre-existing conditions (my BMI is over 30, which CDC considers a pre-existing condition) can not sail on the Proof of Concept cruises (trial runs), but that restriction is not mentioned in the Conditional sailing order.

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10 minutes ago, 2012_Alaska_bound said:

 

From what I read, those with pre-existing conditions (my BMI is over 30, which CDC considers a pre-existing condition) can not sail on the Proof of Concept cruises (trial runs), but that restriction is not mentioned in the Conditional sailing order.

You are right. It seems to indicate that it only relates to trial sailings. But, how do we know regulations won’t be revised? And, how long will it take? 
🙏 we will all be well and able to sail again. 

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Strongly suggest we all use the exact terms from the order to avoid confusion

 

For the initial cruises before any approvals that is simulated. And for cruises after initial approvals that is restricted. 
 

And yes today’s order clearly states that requirements etc can be changed to be more or less strict in all cases and that is a good thing and hope most changes will loosen requirements. 
 

How long it will take is any bodies guess at this time as a lot to do by all parties just to get to restricted cruising let alone back to where we were before coved 19.  The CDC  is starting with a year and hopefully it will be much sooner. 

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7 minutes ago, ronrick1943 said:

In reading it, it seems like no cruise over 7 days until Nov 2021.  That kind of stops all are cruise in 2021.  

Don't believe that is true for all cruises.  For instance ships not in US waters, all of Regent's ships at this time only have to comply with this new order if they will be in US waters before Nov. 1, 2021 and even then only think the 7 day rule will apply to cruises starting in US waters.

 

Should Regent choose to not bring any ships to US waters before Nov. 1, 2021 believe the order now allows them to cruise without complying with the order. Thus longer cruise are allowable.  And, even if ships will be coming into US waters before Nov 1, 2021 they have a number of days prior to that arrival where they have to get the Conditional approval.  

 

There is a lot in the 20 pages or so of the actual order and most everything is subject to change.  Some of the order appears inconsistent to me so it certainly is possible that cruise lines will have questions and changes will need to be made.  Only time will tell. 

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7 hours ago, rallydave said:

Don't believe that is true for all cruises.  For instance ships not in US waters, all of Regent's ships at this time only have to comply with this new order if they will be in US waters before Nov. 1, 2021 and even then only think the 7 day rule will apply to cruises starting in US waters.

 

Should Regent choose to not bring any ships to US waters before Nov. 1, 2021 believe the order now allows them to cruise without complying with the order. Thus longer cruise are allowable.  And, even if ships will be coming into US waters before Nov 1, 2021 they have a number of days prior to that arrival where they have to get the Conditional approval.  

 

There is a lot in the 20 pages or so of the actual order and most everything is subject to change.  Some of the order appears inconsistent to me so it certainly is possible that cruise lines will have questions and changes will need to be made.  Only time will tell. 

With the news from the UK and much of Europe of a 2nd lockdown, this lacks REALISM:  the ships will not be sailing in the next 6 months whatever the CDC  states. Remember most cruises are not out of the US and the ships are all flagged and registered elsewhere - as flags of convenience so the US authorities have limited juristiction over them.

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5 hours ago, GrJ Berkshire said:

With the news from the UK and much of Europe of a 2nd lockdown, this lacks REALISM:  the ships will not be sailing in the next 6 months whatever the CDC  states. Remember most cruises are not out of the US and the ships are all flagged and registered elsewhere - as flags of convenience so the US authorities have limited juristiction over them.

Agree with your thoughts GrJ Berkshire.  Was simply trying to offer options that could be done and that Regent with ships outside of US waters is not completely under the CDC requirements.

 

Also my comment about "should" choose not to bring ships back to US waters was simply rhetorical and was certainly not suggesting any options for Regent or other cruise lines.  Lots of possibilities and as I said the CDC plans for cruise lines to resume sailings are subject to change.

 

Agree ships won't be sailing any time soon as some people believe this new plan by CDC will result in ships sailing in December or early 2021 which is far from possible based on all the hoops the cruise lines have to go thru to simply be allowed to sail conditionally.  

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