Jump to content

Positive news on Covid vaccine!


DaveOKC
 Share

Recommended Posts

16 minutes ago, Mary229 said:

10/29 was only 11 days ago

 

Yes, I know, but that publication probably took a lot of time and when it was released no one in the general public knew about this new vaccine news. They did a good job of planning ahead when I didn't think anyone was allowed to (but I don't want to get into a political fight, especially not now).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/9/2020 at 8:25 PM, Mary229 said:

Demanding that children be vaccinated should be re-instated in every public school.   

 

I so agree with your statement!!!  Doing so, seems to me, such common sense on the part of a parent(s).  

 

Is it OK to have "reservations" and "questions" on the part of the parent(s)?  Of course.  My parents had many concerns when the Salk vaccine became available for my Brother and me.  They got the information that satisfied them that it was in the best interest of my Brother and me that we receive the vaccine. 

 

Surely, I understand and respect the religious objections that some have who are anti-vaxer's.  They have their rights.  But, for those who object for religious reasons, during a crippling pandemic such as this, what would our Heavenly Father think that they ought to do?  

 

"Love thy neighbor as thy self".  If a vaccine will protect your neighbor, you choose not to do so, how does that fulfill this Commandant?  

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/9/2020 at 8:25 PM, Mary229 said:

I agree the anti-vax needs to be corrected.  Many school districts have bent to their hysteria.   Demanding that children be vaccinated should be re-instated in every public school.   I do think the cruise lines should require proof of a vaccine.  As far as the others they are in their own.  People who get the vaccine have nothing to worry about from them.   The CDC is projecting that 80% will get vaccinated.  If you trust their models that will be enough to alleviate the burden on the healthcare system.   

Vaccines are still required here in North Carolina:

 

Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Polio. Measles. Mumps. Rubella. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) Hepatitis B.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, KirkNC said:

Vaccines are still required here in North Carolina:

 

Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Polio. Measles. Mumps. Rubella. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) Hepatitis B.

Vaccines are also required in NY. And in fact the religious exemption was done away with by the state legislature and governor last year after a measles outbreak. The courts upheld the law saying that the state had legitimate grounds based on health concerns for the law to be upheld.

 

There are still medical exemptions. There is a youngster that is our son's Godson in all but name. He could have skipped the measles vaccine as he has a compromised immune system and counted on herd immunity. However, given the measles out break before the outlawing of the religious exemption, his parents decided that skipping the shot would be more dangerous than taking it. Luckily, he had no health problems from the shot.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, PSR said:

 

Yes, I know, but that publication probably took a lot of time and when it was released no one in the general public knew about this new vaccine news. They did a good job of planning ahead when I didn't think anyone was allowed to (but I don't want to get into a political fight, especially not now).

No political bone here.  When this first started I signed up for CDC, WHO and NIH consumer newsletters to keep up with what is going on.  It keeps the discussion clean.  There are blueprint pandemic plans in all governments, all the time.  This is a function of government

Edited by Mary229
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, KirkNC said:

Vaccines are still required here in North Carolina:

 

Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Polio. Measles. Mumps. Rubella. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) Hepatitis B.

some jurisdictions here have given wide latitude.   Not a good plan especially since we have such a large immigrant population who may have never been vaccinated as tots

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, rkacruiser said:

 

I so agree with your statement!!!  Doing so, seems to me, such common sense on the part of a parent(s).  

 

Is it OK to have "reservations" and "questions" on the part of the parent(s)?  Of course.  My parents had many concerns when the Salk vaccine became available for my Brother and me.  They got the information that satisfied them that it was in the best interest of my Brother and me that we receive the vaccine. 

 

Surely, I understand and respect the religious objections that some have who are anti-vaxer's.  They have their rights.  But, for those who object for religious reasons, during a crippling pandemic such as this, what would our Heavenly Father think that they ought to do?  

 

"Love thy neighbor as thy self".  If a vaccine will protect your neighbor, you choose not to do so, how does that fulfill this Commandant?  

I mentioned in another thread that my college roommate was a victim of polio because her parents were anti-vaxxers.  She told me once she became ill and disabled these same virtuous parents dumped her on the foster care system.    If their religious objections are so restrictive maybe they should send their children to a school where vaccines are not required.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Governor Abbott of Texas announces vaccines are ready to be distributed this month in the state of Texas.  He says these will be to first responders and those "most in need".  He says there will be vaccine available by the end of the year in doctors' offices

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Mary229 said:

Governor Abbott of Texas announces vaccines are ready to be distributed this month in the state of Texas.  He says these will be to first responders and those "most in need".  He says there will be vaccine available by the end of the year in doctors' offices

 

That’s strange as I heard on the news that Pfizer will probably not be approved for the vaccine until close to Christmas to allow for the safety time line.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, kazu said:

 

That’s strange as I heard on the news that Pfizer will probably not be approved for the vaccine until close to Christmas to allow for the safety time line.

Obviously the governor has better information than the media

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Mary229 said:

Obviously the governor has better information than the media

LOL - or he doesn’t. 😉 I was listening to the doctors this morning and their explanation made total sense.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Put up your hand if you think that politicians have better information on covid than the media.  Or it could be that they have better data but choose to 'revise' it to meet their purposes....or outright lie.

 

If that was true instead of record covid infections we would be 'rounding' the curve.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mary229 said:

Governor Abbott of Texas announces vaccines are ready to be distributed this month in the state of Texas.  He says these will be to first responders and those "most in need".  He says there will be vaccine available by the end of the year in doctors' offices

Yea and he also believes we have rounded the corner 🙄🙄🙄

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not to mention transported and stored at the correct temperature?

 

Clearly, if mass vaccinations are the order of the day distribution will have to entail far more than availability in 'physicians offices, hospitals, or health authority facilities.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, iancal said:

Not to mention transported and stored at the correct temperature?

 

Clearly, if mass vaccinations are the order of the day distribution will have to entail far more than availability in 'physicians offices, hospitals, or health authority facilities.

 

When we received the Salk and Sabin polio vaccines in the 50s and 60s, the shots and sugar cubes were given at school gyms and cafeterias that were converted for that purpose, supervised by the co. health dept. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/9/2020 at 5:01 PM, rkacruiser said:

Much hope that this news today will make a major difference in our current situation.  

 

But....

 

If the vaccine is truly what's advance billing is, the next major hurdle will be to convince "We, the People"--not just some of "We, the People"--but a very significant percentage of "We, the People" to take the vaccine.  

I could see people having to carry a laminated card proving they have been vaccinated. I know plenty of folk who are very leery about getting a new vaccine, but I will be standing in line. I think healthcare workers might be forced to get it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Roz said:

 

When we received the Salk and Sabin polio vaccines in the 50s and 60s, the shots and sugar cubes were given at school gyms and cafeterias that were converted for that purpose, supervised by the co. health dept. 

Yes, but the problem is the vaccine needs to be stored at ultra low temperatures of IIRC around minus 70 Celsius.  According to news reports,  Most hospitals don’t even have that capability.  This will cause huge logistical issues for transport and distribution. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, bennybear said:

Yes, but the problem is the vaccine needs to be stored at ultra low temperatures of IIRC around minus 70 Celsius.  According to news reports,  Most hospitals don’t even have that capability.  This will cause huge logistical issues for transport and distribution. 

It is reported that the Pfizer vaccine needs minus 70c during the distribution, but has a 'shelf life' of up to 5 days in regular refrigerators. 

From there, the vaccine will be transported in suitcase-sized storage boxes packed with dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) that have been specially designed by Pfizer. Each reusable box can hold between 1,000 and 5,000 doses at ultra-cold temperatures for up to 10 days. Pfizer said its vaccine can be kept for up to five days at fridge temperatures of 2-8C.

source: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/nov/10/pfizer-and-biontechs-vaccine-poses-global-logistics-challenge      (hope this is viewable in N. America!)

 

There are also hopeful signs for other vaccines that do not require the ultra low temperature during transportation.

https://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/despite-pfizer-s-high-efficacy-expectations-other-covid-vaccines-may-have-a-logistics-edge

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, VMax1700 said:

It is reported that the Pfizer vaccine needs minus 70c during the distribution, but has a 'shelf life' of up to 5 days in regular refrigerators. 

From there, the vaccine will be transported in suitcase-sized storage boxes packed with dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) that have been specially designed by Pfizer. Each reusable box can hold between 1,000 and 5,000 doses at ultra-cold temperatures for up to 10 days. Pfizer said its vaccine can be kept for up to five days at fridge temperatures of 2-8C.

source: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/nov/10/pfizer-and-biontechs-vaccine-poses-global-logistics-challenge      (hope this is viewable in N. America!)

 

There are also hopeful signs for other vaccines that do not require the ultra low temperature during transportation.

https://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/despite-pfizer-s-high-efficacy-expectations-other-covid-vaccines-may-have-a-logistics-edge

Thanks for sharing,  that sounds more positive! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@VMax1700, thanks for the info.  It's not an insurmountable obstacle, and we have logistical capabilities not available in the 50s and 60s.  Look at the factories that use just in time delivery.  This is all very promising.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, VMax1700 said:

It is reported that the Pfizer vaccine needs minus 70c during the distribution, but has a 'shelf life' of up to 5 days in regular refrigerators. 

From there, the vaccine will be transported in suitcase-sized storage boxes packed with dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) that have been specially designed by Pfizer. Each reusable box can hold between 1,000 and 5,000 doses at ultra-cold temperatures for up to 10 days. Pfizer said its vaccine can be kept for up to five days at fridge temperatures of 2-8C.

source: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/nov/10/pfizer-and-biontechs-vaccine-poses-global-logistics-challenge      (hope this is viewable in N. America!)

 

There are also hopeful signs for other vaccines that do not require the ultra low temperature during transportation.

https://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/despite-pfizer-s-high-efficacy-expectations-other-covid-vaccines-may-have-a-logistics-edge

I've also read that FedEx and UPS are going to retrofit a small portion of their transport fleet to include the necessary refrigeration units to transport the vaccine at the required temperatures. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...