Jump to content

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Ardennais said:

No over 80s in the community around here have had appointments either, just rumours that the local practice is hoping to get the vaccine by the end of January. If so, that will be a full 6 weeks after the first community vaccines in some parts of the country (naming no names!), and well after some others in the same group have had their second jab. There’s a lot of catching up to do!

Exactly the same in this part of England. None of the over 80s or Clinically Extremely Vulnerable have yet been called up, and the vaccination centre still hasn't opened. Something of a postcode lottery in all this.

 

We're doing pretty well so far, internationally, probably because the NHS is such a cohesive force, but I do wish daft statements hadn't been made by Matt Hancock about millions of vaccinations by the end of 2020, when the actual figure achieved wasn't remotely near that - it just drains away what little trust people have in the government already.

 

I'm still very wary of the use of the word 'offered' rather than 'delivered' in the mid-February promise, given the way the 100,000 test target was cynically manipulated by counting tests just put in the post! To get anywhere near that the number of current vaccinations will have to rocket very shortly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Ardennais said:

No over 80s in the community around here have had appointments either, just rumours that the local practice is hoping to get the vaccine by the end of January. If so, that will be a full 6 weeks after the first community vaccines in some parts of the country (naming no names!), and well after some others in the same group have had their second jab. There’s a lot of catching up to do!

Sadly no over 80s done here either....... The info keeps changing too with vaccinations starting next week, to starting in two weeks to then starting at a practice 10 miles away in the near future.......😢

Link to post
Share on other sites

There was an item on the BBC south today programme last night about the Weald in Kent where the local GP group has declined to provide a vaccination service. People will have to travel to Headcorn in an adjacent area which has offered cover, I checked this morning and that hub is due to start vaccinating tomorrow. In my area 2 of the 5 hubs have had their status changed to 'not started' yet.

In an interview it was reported that lots of people are still contacting hubs despite being told not to.

 

It has become a real postcode lottery 😟

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Newark Centre is opening today (just made it into 'this week') and should be able to do quite a heavy workload as it is a biggish site.  Over 80's should get their letters by the middle of next week, apparently.

 

I have heard that some sites are not getting the vaccine when it was promised; I think we all have to be patient as it is a very large undertaking and the urgency is much greater than with the flu vaccine, which has been going on for many years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Concerning comments from experts on the Today programme just now about the new strains we’re trying to keep out of the UK not perhaps being controllable by the current vaccines. Echoing comments yesterday from Patrick Vallance during the PM briefing saying the same thing.

 

We can doubtless manufacture new vaccines within a few months, or even less, but a revaccination programme? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

There seems to be little going on down here with regards to vaccinations. The local news keeps on about how have been administered in Devon but they have only mentioned Cornwall once, a practice in Penzance.

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Harry Peterson said:

Concerning comments from experts on the Today programme just now about the new strains we’re trying to keep out of the UK not perhaps being controllable by the current vaccines. Echoing comments yesterday from Patrick Vallance during the PM briefing saying the same thing.

 

We can doubtless manufacture new vaccines within a few months, or even less, but a revaccination programme? 

I would be surprised if the vaccine manufacturers didn't have samples/coding for the new strain and were not already working on a modified vaccine, in the same way they do every year with the flu vaccine. This is where the companies making the mRNA vaccines will step up as they can react much quicker with this technology. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Our surgery is planning 800 injections in a 12 hour blitz today.  It sounds like a military exercise, with 300 volunteers over the period, helping with everything from the actual jab to car parking and tea brewing

Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents had their first jabs yesterday and I was surprised to discover they had the Pfizer one. As theirs was one of the last GP’s round here to join a ‘hub’ I thought it would be the Oxford one.

For local people, they live in Gillingham but their surgery comes under St Mary’s Island now - they were sent to Strood for theirs. Luckily my Dad drives.

Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, yorkshirephil said:

I would be surprised if the vaccine manufacturers didn't have samples/coding for the new strain and were not already working on a modified vaccine, in the same way they do every year with the flu vaccine. This is where the companies making the mRNA vaccines will step up as they can react much quicker with this technology. 

I’m inclined to agree, and the new mRNA vaccines can certainly be modified quickly. Production, testing and distribution takes a little longer, but it’s the actual revaccination programme that concerns me, particularly if we have to revaccinate, maybe within weeks, all those being vaccinated now.

 

A huge and expensive operation, and one that we need to get right, but no real alternative if the new strain does prove resistant.

Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Harry Peterson said:

I’m inclined to agree, and the new mRNA vaccines can certainly be modified quickly. Production, testing and distribution takes a little longer, but it’s the actual revaccination programme that concerns me, particularly if we have to revaccinate, maybe within weeks, all those being vaccinated now.

 

A huge and expensive operation, and one that we need to get right, but no real alternative if the new strain does prove resistant.

I thought Patrick Vallance said that the vaccine was unlikely to be ineffective against any new variant but that it might reduce efficacy. When he was talking to the commons select committee in the week, he estimated that we were a couple of years away from needing a tweaked covid vaccine. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, purplesea said:

There seems to be little going on down here with regards to vaccinations. The local news keeps on about how have been administered in Devon but they have only mentioned Cornwall once, a practice in Penzance.

I know they're using Plymouth Pavilions and have been for a while but that's not really much use to the residents of Cornwall. My parents are in Penzance but haven't heard anything yet. I'm sure I read that the army were going to get vaccinations on the go in Cornwall from next week. Nadhim Zahawi was saying that they would send a mobile vaccination vehicle to places that weren't within 10 miles of a vaccination hub. Not seen much about it since though. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cruisenewbie1976 said:

I thought Patrick Vallance said that the vaccine was unlikely to be ineffective against any new variant but that it might reduce efficacy. When he was talking to the commons select committee in the week, he estimated that we were a couple of years away from needing a tweaked covid vaccine. 

 

Yes.  On the briefing he said that the current vaccines should work against the UK variant and one of the Brazilian versions, but it was unclear about the other Brazilian or the South African ones, though he thought they are more likely to affect the efficacy, though still be susceptible to some extent.  I have not tried to quote but was definitely my understanding of what he said and it seemed pretty clear as he said it, so very unlikely I misunderstood, (though my explanation not worded so well).

 

He also said that, as far as he was aware, the Brazilian variant that was likely less susceptible to the vaccine is not in the UK at present, though the other one is here already.  

Edited by tring
Link to post
Share on other sites

Unexpectedly, the day has become glorious, with warm sunshine.  The dog park was a riot, as lots of us had delayed walkies till the rain had passed.  Lots of canine 💤 going on now

 

We passed the surgery on the way there and back.  It all looked very efficient, with a least half a dozen volunteers in hi-viz jackets outside, ensuring safe crossing of the road, ticking off lists etc etc.  And lots and lots of sprightly and not so sprightly oldies on foot, rolling walker and wheelchair, looking as though they were smiling underneath their face masks, making their way in.  There was a shift change for volunteers as we came back, and the guy with the clipboard seemed to have it all under control

 

It might be our turn before the end of the month ... 🤞

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, cruisenewbie1976 said:

I thought Patrick Vallance said that the vaccine was unlikely to be ineffective against any new variant but that it might reduce efficacy. When he was talking to the commons select committee in the week, he estimated that we were a couple of years away from needing a tweaked covid vaccine. 

There does seem to be a lot of concern around what efficacy means. I have always assumed that the 60, 70 or 90% figures represent an average level of protection that a vaccine will provide across a range of people, some will get a high level of protection, some moderate and some only a low level, but it is unlikely that anyone will get no protection at all. But some people seem to assume that a vaccine with 70% efficacy will leave 30% of those vaccinated with no protection at all.

This is definitely an area that would benefit from an expert with the common touch to give us better guidance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I think most non-experts, myself included, do not understand statistics as well as they think they do

 

It’s an area Govt and Public Health communicators could look at and easily make improvements 

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Eddie99 said:

Unexpectedly, the day has become glorious, with warm sunshine.  The dog park was a riot, as lots of us had delayed walkies till the rain had passed.  Lots of canine 💤 going on now

 

We passed the surgery on the way there and back.  It all looked very efficient, with a least half a dozen volunteers in hi-viz jackets outside, ensuring safe crossing of the road, ticking off lists etc etc.  And lots and lots of sprightly and not so sprightly oldies on foot, rolling walker and wheelchair, looking as though they were smiling underneath their face masks, making their way in.  There was a shift change for volunteers as we came back, and the guy with the clipboard seemed to have it all under control

 

It might be our turn before the end of the month ... 🤞

Sunshine here in West Sussex also. However I had a rather wet walk with Freddie this morning. We both came home soaked.

Good to hear your surgery is jabbing today and I’ll keep my fingers crossed your turn is soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, terrierjohn said:

There does seem to be a lot of concern around what efficacy means. I have always assumed that the 60, 70 or 90% figures represent an average level of protection that a vaccine will provide across a range of people, some will get a high level of protection, some moderate and some only a low level, but it is unlikely that anyone will get no protection at all. But some people seem to assume that a vaccine with 70% efficacy will leave 30% of those vaccinated with no protection at all.

This is definitely an area that would benefit from an expert with the common touch to give us better guidance.

That's my understanding as well. ie 90% protection means that 90 out of 100 people will not contract the virus, but that the remaining 10 will still have a certain level of immunity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, terrierjohn said:

There does seem to be a lot of concern around what efficacy means. I have always assumed that the 60, 70 or 90% figures represent an average level of protection that a vaccine will provide across a range of people, some will get a high level of protection, some moderate and some only a low level, but it is unlikely that anyone will get no protection at all. But some people seem to assume that a vaccine with 70% efficacy will leave 30% of those vaccinated with no protection at all.

This is definitely an area that would benefit from an expert with the common touch to give us better guidance.

I think the important thing to note from the Oxford trials is that none of the vaccinated people had severe covid or needed hospitalisation, even if they did test positive. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

More delays reported in North Wales today. 
 

GPs in north Wales are being advised to consider delaying Covid-19 vaccine appointments early next week due to a hold-up affecting about 26,000 doses. 
 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of over 80s in our area have had their vaccinations and some their second one. I am in the group that should be done by mid Feb but have a concern. I have been told that if you are allergic to penicillin, as I am, you can only have the Oxford one. I have been told to remind the practice when I get my letter/phone call. My worry is if they don’t have any left, I will have to wait till new supplies come in. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Jennizor said:

Lots of over 80s in our area have had their vaccinations and some their second one. I am in the group that should be done by mid Feb but have a concern. I have been told that if you are allergic to penicillin, as I am, you can only have the Oxford one. I have been told to remind the practice when I get my letter/phone call. My worry is if they don’t have any left, I will have to wait till new supplies come in. 

Can I ask who gave you that advice as does not seem to follow what had been said in the past.  DH is allergic to penicillin, but our surgery website says their hub has been supplied with the Pfizer one.  Aged 70 so no need to worry just yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really thought about this before I raised the issue of penicillin. It came from a retired GP who has just returned to work to help with the vaccinations. She said not to worry about stocks of the Oxford vaccine but,  as they are ramping up the numbers vaccinations, I did exactly that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with RiverCruising, the River Cruise Experts
      • Q&A: Cruise Insurance with Steve Dasseos of TripInsuranceStore.com
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...