Jump to content

Whale Watching and Sea Sickness


kstetser
 Share

Recommended Posts

We will hopefully be sailing August 2021 and I'm starting to look at ship excursions since it's possible they will be required (we tend to do port adventures on our own as I don't care to be herded).   Anyway - more than anything I want to see whales.  We will be stopping in Icy Straight Point, Juneau and Ketchikan.   My husband gets sea sick on small watercraft and is super hesitant to go on a whale whale watching tour.  What whale watching tours would you recommend based on type of watercraft and location?    

 

Happy Thanksgiving 

Kathi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oddly I only get sea sick on the large cruise ships.  Anyhow, we always see whales of all types right from the ship.  Its all about looking out and scanning the horizon and watching for them to blow, then keep looking in that vicinity.

 

All 3 of your destinations are in good protected waters, however the companies make their money and good ratings by showing you whales, so depending on where they are that day you may have to go out in some swells or chop.

 

FYI on our first trip to Icy Strait we had 2 orcas just hanging around right next to the cruise ship, excellent view from top deck.  Also on your last day at sea if you are heading back to Vancouver, get top side as you enter Johnstone Strait at the north end of Vancouver Island.  As the channel narrows look for groups of small sport fishing boats grouped together, usually around a point or somethimg.  If its a good year for salmon returns the whales are often very close by.  Seen this many times, usually enter the strait later in the afternoon, on a sunny day its glorious.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are concerned with sea sickness, I think your best bet would be one of the ship’s excursions on the Allen Marine catamarans out of Juneau.  
My favorite  (11 times) has always been their evening whale watch.  
https://allenmarinetours.com/juneau/whale-evening/#prettyPhoto

Very stable ride, warm and comfortable in rainy weather.  Most importantly, when the boat stops to look at whales, even if the water is relatively calm, you’re not bouncing around as you would on one of the smaller boats.  IMO, Auke Bay has less choppy water than ISP.  Forget Ketchikan for whales.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I feel nauseous on a ferris wheel!  I have been in the Galapagos on a tiny ship on a night when only 50% of the passengers were in dinner (the rest were being sick) - and my husband and I were eating as normal! It's because I take Dramamine or similar morning and night for the whole cruise, and also put on sea bands when I go to sleep at night. It holds it at bay. We are booked for 2022 - please wish us luck to go, and I have already booked us for 3 whale watching tours in very small boats.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

We love whale watching excursions in Icy Strait. The first time we went out, there was a little chop in the morning, but it settled down a bit towards the end. The 2nd time we went out, it was glass smooth all the way. Both times, I got great pics and video clips. The 1st time we went out, I took Bonine all during the cruise. The 2nd time, I went cold turkey having suspected a side-effect of Bonine being causing depression. I'm in Alaska! The last thing I need is something to cause me to be depressed. I never had an issue with motion sickness either time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I get sea sick, especially on small crafts when the waves are rockin. It is miserable and it does not go away. Take a meclazine. It's name brand Bonine - available over the counter at the pharmacy. Non drowsy formula, last 24 hours. Won't miss out on the fun and won't be sick doing it. 🙂

 

We took a ship whale watching excursion in Juneau. It was awesome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

ALL watercraft used for whale watching excursions will be WAY smaller than the

cruise ship. We went on one in Juneau that was through the ship- larger, very crowded,

holding at least 50-75 people. We saw lots of whales and their "bubble netting".

The next time in Juneau, we went with a private company. The boat held the "Captain"

and six passengers. Fantastic!

Only you can decide if the smaller boats will be ok and if taking meds will be effective.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although it doesn’t happen often, we were on a small boat whale watch trip out of Juneau with Jayleen when she was at Harv n Marv.  We were unable to get very close to the whales due to being tossed around by the waves.  We departed a bit early for the dock and couldn’t make it back so had to transfer to a larger boat.  The waves had begun crashing over the bow, over the cab and into the area in the back of the boat.  Several were sick.  That being the case, we’d still choose the smaller boat and have done several that way. If sea sickness is an issue the larger boats may be better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Thank You for 25 Years - Click for Fun Stuff!
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...