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Any up to date reports from the Channel ports?


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7 minutes ago, terrierjohn said:

But was it illegal food they were looking for, in Cozumel I would have thought it more likely to be drugs, although maybe not when disembarking. 

We were told that we weren't allowed to take food ashore, and that the dogs would check our bags.

 

Nobody mentioned that we couldn't take drugs ashore! 

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7 minutes ago, terrierjohn said:

But was it illegal food they were looking for, in Cozumel I would have thought it more likely to be drugs, although maybe not when disembarking. 

When the sniffer dogs get glassy eyed, that means they found the cocaine 🤣

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A man had just settled into his seat next to the window on the plane,…

When another man sat down in the aisle seat and put his black Labrador Retriever in the middle seat next to the man.

The first man looks very quizzically at the dog and asks why the dog is allowed on the plane.

The second man explained that he is a DEA agent and the dog is a “sniffing dog”.

His name is Sniffer and he’s the best there is.

I’ll show you once we get airborne, when I put him to work.”

The plane takes off, and once it has levelled out, the agent says

“Watch this. He tells Sniffer to “search”.

Sniffer jumps down, walks along the aisle, and finally sits very purposefully next to a woman for a several seconds.

Sniffer then returns to its seat and puts one paw on the agent’s arm.

The agent says, “Good boy”,

and he turns to the man and says:

“That woman is in possession of marijuana, so I’m making a note of her seat number and the authorities will apprehend her when we land.”

“Say, that’s pretty neat.” replies the first man.

Once again, the agent sends Sniffer to search the aisles.

The Lab sniffs about, sits down beside a man for a few seconds, returns to its seat, and this time, he places TWO paws on the agent’s arm.

The agent says,

“That man is carrying cocaine, so again, I m making a note of his seat number for the police.”

“I like it!” says his seat mate.

The agent then told Sniffer to “search” again.

Sniffer walked up and down the aisles for a little while, sat down for a moment, and then came racing back to the agent, jumped into the middle seat and proceeded to crap all over the place.

The first man is really grossed out by this behaviour and can’t figure out how or why a well-trained dog would act like that, so he asks the agent,

“What’s going on?”

The agent nervously replied,

 

 

 

 

* * * * * * * * * * *

“He just found a bomb!”

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17 minutes ago, Dermotsgirl said:

We were told that we weren't allowed to take food ashore, and that the dogs would check our bags.

 

Nobody mentioned that we couldn't take drugs ashore! 

I suppose drugs to Mexico is a bit like coals to Newcastle!!!

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3 hours ago, Dermotsgirl said:

When we went to Cozumel a sniffer dog checked our bags as we went through the terminal. We actually had to offer our bag to the dog so that he could do his job quickly.

 

As our relationship is now the same to the EU as it is to Mexico i.e. nothing special, it’s not beyond the realms of possibility that we will be vetted by dogs before we are allowed entry! 

Dogs vetting humans,that's a first.On a more serious note,in Aus and NZ during the walk from the gate to customs there are big signs and bins every 50mts or so to enable passengers to offload before getting nicked.No excuse.

Edited by brian1
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2 hours ago, wowzz said:

No, it's not. For example, a processed cereal bar, or box of cornflakes would be fine. 

Perhaps you should read the legislation again, because you are totally wrong.

Genuine question.

What about food that has already  been exported to UK from EU. Not just biscuits, but fruit and cheeses. You can't take them back to the EU again, so to speak?

Avril

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20 minutes ago, Adawn47 said:

Genuine question.

What about food that has already  been exported to UK from EU. Not just biscuits, but fruit and cheeses. You can't take them back to the EU again, so to speak?

Avril

As I understand it, no you can't.

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3 minutes ago, Adawn47 said:

Strange

Avril

I suppose that if the ham or cheese is still in the original, unopened packaging, you could argue the case with the officials, and probably get through with it. Obviously, trying to convince them that the ham or cheese in your sandwich was from the EU would be impossible for you to prove, and would therefore be confiscated.

As I understand it, biscuits would be allowed regardless of country of origin.

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Bang goes my hopes of taking over British bacon,bangers and mature cheddar.We normally take a years supply with us.Lidl It. have British weeks now and then.We're not total Phillistines by the way but do like home comforts now and then.

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12 minutes ago, Ardennais said:

Local news in North Wales is a bit depressing today. Apart from the vaccine delays, there’s worrying news that hauliers are bypassing Welsh ports. 
 

Brexit: Irish hauliers 'bypassing Welsh ports', say bosses https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-55682597

An appalling situation all round, and I feel for those most adversely affected by this mess. You can understand hauliers not wanting their trucks stuck in queues not earning anything, but that’s cold comfort for importers, exporters and customers.

 

This was never going to happen, of course..........

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55 minutes ago, Harry Peterson said:

An appalling situation all round, and I feel for those most adversely affected by this mess. You can understand hauliers not wanting their trucks stuck in queues not earning anything, but that’s cold comfort for importers, exporters and customers.

 

This was never going to happen, of course..........

Did I read somewhere that this applies to continental drivers who are paid by the 'mile' so if the lorry is standing still they don't earn anything. I might be wrong though.

 

How are UK driver salaries calculated?

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4 minutes ago, davecttr said:

Did I read somewhere that this applies to continental drivers who are paid by the 'mile' so if the lorry is standing still they don't earn anything. I might be wrong though.

 

How are UK driver salaries calculated?

All the HGV drivers I know are paid by the hour, with various bonuses and overtime rates, seems to vary from company yo company. It seems to be  different for some of the courier services, I have heard many different tales over the years, from hourly paid to piecework.

 

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21 minutes ago, davecttr said:

Did I read somewhere that this applies to continental drivers who are paid by the 'mile' so if the lorry is standing still they don't earn anything. I might be wrong though.

 

How are UK driver salaries calculated?

I heard something similar, but it’s not an area I know much about. I was thinking more in generic terms, in that however you calculate the proportions between labour and other costs a truck that isn’t moving isn’t earning.

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My understanding is that UK drivers are paid an hourly rate,  but many foreign drivers are paid based on mileage,  so if they are stuck at Dover or Calais  they are not being paid, hence their reluctance to take on deliveries to the UK.

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2 hours ago, wowzz said:

My understanding is that UK drivers are paid an hourly rate,  but many foreign drivers are paid based on mileage,  so if they are stuck at Dover or Calais  they are not being paid, hence their reluctance to take on deliveries to the UK.

It is something that needs sorting out. However if there are long term issues then, as always, the laws of supply and demand will dictate whether future business can be viable  and at what price.

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4 hours ago, terrierjohn said:

It is something that needs sorting out. However if there are long term issues then, as always, the laws of supply and demand will dictate whether future business can be viable  and at what price.

I think that due to the extra costs involved,  hauliers will have no option but to increase their charges. 

However, to the UK  consumer,  the increase in price will not seem that much - 5p more for a cucumber,  10p more for a lettuce. Individually,  not significant, and over a basket of goods, perhaps only 50p or 60p per week. 

But, it is the cost of exporting that will be the problem for many UK exporters. Just as an example - a small cheese producer previously could  send their product all over Europe in exactly the same way as if sending their cheese to Glasgow.

Now, every consignment  has to  be accompanied by a health certificate, and a vet has to check and sign off on each shipment. Admittedly, it has been some years since I was involved in getting veterinary approval for cheese shipments to Hong Kong, Australia etc. but vets don't come cheap!

The sheer administrative hassle, let alone the cost,  is likely to make many UK industries just give up exporting altogether,  reduce their staff numbers, and become insular in their outlook. And who can blame them?  

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9 hours ago, wowzz said:

I think that due to the extra costs involved,  hauliers will have no option but to increase their charges. 

However, to the UK  consumer,  the increase in price will not seem that much - 5p more for a cucumber,  10p more for a lettuce. Individually,  not significant, and over a basket of goods, perhaps only 50p or 60p per week. 

But, it is the cost of exporting that will be the problem for many UK exporters. Just as an example - a small cheese producer previously could  send their product all over Europe in exactly the same way as if sending their cheese to Glasgow.

Now, every consignment  has to  be accompanied by a health certificate, and a vet has to check and sign off on each shipment. Admittedly, it has been some years since I was involved in getting veterinary approval for cheese shipments to Hong Kong, Australia etc. but vets don't come cheap!

The sheer administrative hassle, let alone the cost,  is likely to make many UK industries just give up exporting altogether,  reduce their staff numbers, and become insular in their outlook. And who can blame them?  

Be reasonable. You’re forgetting about sovereignty. :classic_laugh:

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20 hours ago, Harry Peterson said:

An appalling situation all round, and I feel for those most adversely affected by this mess. You can understand hauliers not wanting their trucks stuck in queues not earning anything, but that’s cold comfort for importers, exporters and customers.

 

This was never going to happen, of course..........

A truck going from Calais to Dover, M20,M25,M4. Over to Ireland, Non Uk registered no road tax. All the pollution and congestion. Now goes direct from France to Ireland. That's a good result isn't it ?.

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1 hour ago, zap99 said:

A truck going from Calais to Dover, M20,M25,M4. Over to Ireland, Non Uk registered no road tax. All the pollution and congestion. Now goes direct from France to Ireland. That's a good result isn't it ?.

Possibly in terms of the environment but no comfort at all to the Welsh ports and their workers. The same Welsh ports who were reassured by the Welsh Secretary in 2019 (i.e the Welsh Secretary at Westminster) that the UK govt would ensure that they could continue to operate seamlessly. 

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1 hour ago, zap99 said:

A truck going from Calais to Dover, M20,M25,M4. Over to Ireland, Non Uk registered no road tax. All the pollution and congestion. Now goes direct from France to Ireland. That's a good result isn't it ?.

Depends on who is paying for the extra costs involved.

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14 hours ago, wowzz said:

I think that due to the extra costs involved,  hauliers will have no option but to increase their charges. 

However, to the UK  consumer,  the increase in price will not seem that much - 5p more for a cucumber,  10p more for a lettuce. Individually,  not significant, and over a basket of goods, perhaps only 50p or 60p per week. 

But, it is the cost of exporting that will be the problem for many UK exporters. Just as an example - a small cheese producer previously could  send their product all over Europe in exactly the same way as if sending their cheese to Glasgow.

Now, every consignment  has to  be accompanied by a health certificate, and a vet has to check and sign off on each shipment. Admittedly, it has been some years since I was involved in getting veterinary approval for cheese shipments to Hong Kong, Australia etc. but vets don't come cheap!

The sheer administrative hassle, let alone the cost,  is likely to make many UK industries just give up exporting altogether,  reduce their staff numbers, and become insular in their outlook. And who can blame them?  

Do we know for certain that fresh salad, vegetables and fruit deliveries to the supermarkets and wholesalers in the UK are being delayed because of documentation problems either at import or when the vehicles return to Europe. Also do we know if all these vehicles normally do return loads, which could decide whether there is a potential documentation delay, other than a covid test document which is nothing to do with Brexit.

If not then it's a bit disingenuous of you to expand the cost implications away from the current issues which mainly affect seafood exports.

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15 minutes ago, terrierjohn said:

Do we know for certain that fresh salad, vegetables and fruit deliveries to the supermarkets and wholesalers in the UK are being delayed because of documentation problems either at import or when the vehicles return to Europe. Also do we know if all these vehicles normally do return loads, which could decide whether there is a potential documentation delay, other than a covid test document which is nothing to do with Brexit.

If not then it's a bit disingenuous of you to expand the cost implications away from the current issues which mainly affect seafood exports.

BBC News - Brexit: 'Most difficult week I've had in this job in 20 years'
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55659006

I would however agree with you that delays caused by the need for negative CV19 results are not Brexit related.

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