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Anyislandwilldo
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My DH, sister and brother in law are planning a Mediterranean Cruise for Sept 2023.  Sister and BIL are celebrating their 40th wedding anniversary.  I would love to read all your reviews of your cruises that you have taken.  Would you be so kind to share them with?  This will help me in my research for our cruise.  Thanks in advance.  

 

We plan to spend a few days in Rome and Santorini is a must for me since its part of my bucket list.  

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Welcome to the Med forums -- as you'll see, the ports are divided into different forums for Italy,. Greece, Spain, France and other (e.g., Turkey, Croatia, etc.).  Perhaps because of that division, not too many people post cruise reviews on these forums -- I guess they are more common on the boards for individual cruise lines.

 

Are there specific Italian ports (in addition to Rome) that you are considering, or are looking for suggestions for seeing?

 

I've been to Rome many, many times and it definitely deserves several days pre- or post-cruise (or both!). For the beginner, Rick Steves guides have a lot of great information and some self-guided tours of some sites (as well as good walking tours to do on your own). 

 

If you are looking for a basic overview of the city, I would suggest that you consider planning for one day primarily doing the Vatican sites (St. Peter's, the Vatican museum, the Sistine chapel) and if you are interested, climbing the dome, or possibly the Scavi tour under St. Peter's (reservations mandatory).  Time permitting you could also see the Castel Sant'angelo on that day (a fascinating place that started out as the tomb of a Roman emperor, then a fortress protecting the Vatican and hideaway for Popes -- most recently featured in Dan Brown's "Angels and Demons").

 

Then sit aside one day for the "ancient" Roman sites -- The Colosseum, Forum, Palatine Hill, and I would also include either the Capitoline Museum or the Museum of the Imperial Forums -- all of these are also relatively close together. Alternatively (if you have an interest in ancient Rome) in this area I would also suggest visiting the Baths of Caracalla, to see what a HUGE Roman baths looked like; they also have a cool "virtual reality" headset so you can really immerse yourselves (well, not literally) in the experience.

 

Finally, one day for the "central" Rome tourist spots -- the Pantheon, Trevi Fountain, Piazza Navona, Spanish steps (wander down the very pricy shopping streets there as well), Campo dei Fiori. Rick Steves has a self-guided walk that includes many of these sites.

 

Look for a centrally located hotel -- somewhere between Trevi Fountain and Campo dei Fiori is ideal. The Vatican is an outlier; most of the other sites are walkable.

 

Hope this is helpful!

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Hello Cruisemom42!!  Thank you so much for offering your advice in previous post.  I hope you don't mind answering more questions.

 

 I'll start with a little back ground.  I had a friend who lived in Rome 30 years ago and was invited over for a visit.  During the 12 days I had in Italy, I explored Rome, Naples, Bologna, Florence and Venice.  It was one of the best trips of my life.  My sister wanted to do a Med cruise and I found one that sails out of Rome (Civitavecchia) and goes to Italian ports and Greece ports.  I told my sister that there is A LOT to see in Rome and I thought 2 days would be suffice to check out the sites.  I had read also that staying in city central would be the best place to stay due to walking distance to most of the sites.  The Vatican is an outlier as you stated.  We would probably do that on the second day.  Sister wants to see the catacombs.  Do you have an opinion on those for her?

 

DH is second generation Italian/Sicilian.  He really wants to go to Palermo and the port stop is in Messina.  His ancestors come from the Palermo area.  Do you have any experience in Sicily?

 

DH and I sat down and started to watch a 5 hour walking tour of Italy.  Now he has a better taste of what to expect.  I will check out the Rick Steves guides as well.  We really want to sit down at one of those sidewalk cafes and try some food.  Is there anyway we can find out in advance what kind of food is offered and price?  I guess maybe a google search for a menu??  Things sure have changed in the last 30 years since I was there.

 

Do we exchange currency in US before arriving in Italy?  Any tips on flights??  We would be flying out of Chicago O'Hare.  Are the pick pockets really that bad?  I know they were when I went.  My friend was fluent in Italian and had a black belt in taekwondo which made the experience all the much better.  

 

Sister and I are considering VRBO in central city.  Are there markets near by to pick up staples for the apartment/ VRBO?  Are there any hotels that you would recommend in city central?  budget of $100/night of less.  

 

What kind of budget should we plan for eating lunch dinner?

 

Sister wants to pick up some wine before the cruise.  Any suggestions? Will I need to pack a corkscrew?

 

How to avoid line at the Sistine Chapel?

 

Thanks again.  I really appreciate it!!

 

 

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A lot of your general questions can be answered with research on these boards. For example, there are many threads on when and how to exchange money. The answer is ATMs in country are the best exchange rates without a doubt. Also be aware credit cards are the far more likely thing to use, as opposed to cash, unless you are making small purchases, like under 25 euros, when cash is more appropriate.

 

Yes, there are little and medium sized markets all over the place. There are dozens and dozens of threads here on hotels...budget is always a key factor, as Europe is not cheap.

 

Pickpockets can be a problem...discussed here frequently. But a few commonly recommended steps really cuts down the threat.

 

Nothing complicated about flights...it will be a redeye flight over...a couple of airlines do non-stops. Day time flight coming back. 

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12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

Hello Cruisemom42!!  Thank you so much for offering your advice in previous post.  I hope you don't mind answering more questions.

 

 I'll start with a little back ground.  I had a friend who lived in Rome 30 years ago and was invited over for a visit.  During the 12 days I had in Italy, I explored Rome, Naples, Bologna, Florence and Venice.  It was one of the best trips of my life.  My sister wanted to do a Med cruise and I found one that sails out of Rome (Civitavecchia) and goes to Italian ports and Greece ports.  I told my sister that there is A LOT to see in Rome and I thought 2 days would be suffice to check out the sites.  I had read also that staying in city central would be the best place to stay due to walking distance to most of the sites.  The Vatican is an outlier as you stated.  We would probably do that on the second day.  Sister wants to see the catacombs.  Do you have an opinion on those for her?

 

The problem with the catacombs is their location -- not in the centr and not so easy to get to for someone not as experienced negotiating public transportation (bus, metro).  If the catacombs are a must, you could consider a tour that picks up/drops off at your hotel, but it will take 1/2 a day of your two days. Again, I would really recommend 3 days in Rome. Also, consider timing -- there are 3 main catacombs on the Appian Way and they are not all open every day. One is closed on Sunday, one on Wednesday, and so on...

 

Check for additional info and tour suggestions at a site such as this one:   https://www.rometoolkit.com/whattodo/catacombs.html

 

 

12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

DH is second generation Italian/Sicilian.  He really wants to go to Palermo and the port stop is in Messina.  His ancestors come from the Palermo area.  Do you have any experience in Sicily?

 

Yes, I've been to Sicily a number of times. Unfortunately Messina and Palermo are quite a distance apart, almost at opposite ends of the island, about a 3 hour drive -- too far to visit on a one-day port stop. You'd spend nearly 6 hours just driving. 

 

 

12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

 

DH and I sat down and started to watch a 5 hour walking tour of Italy.  Now he has a better taste of what to expect.  I will check out the Rick Steves guides as well.  We really want to sit down at one of those sidewalk cafes and try some food.  Is there anyway we can find out in advance what kind of food is offered and price?  I guess maybe a google search for a menu??  Things sure have changed in the last 30 years since I was there.

 

Most restaurants post menus at the podium. Fair warning that the ones located on more picturesque piazzas (like Piazza Navona, Campo dei Fiori, etc.) are priced to reflect the superior views. Food tends to be very traditional Italian in many cases, things like pasta carbonara or amatriciana or chicken cacciatore. Pizza is Roman style -- very thin, almost crisp crust and limited toppings. Bread tends to be given to you, but there is usually a small charge for it, don't be surprised, it is normal.

 

If eating outdoors, keep a close eye on your belongings -- don't put a purse or jacket (with phone in pocket) on the back of your chair -- due to pickpockets. 

 

 

12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

 

Do we exchange currency in US before arriving in Italy?  Any tips on flights??  We would be flying out of Chicago O'Hare.  Are the pick pockets really that bad?  I know they were when I went.  My friend was fluent in Italian and had a black belt in taekwondo which made the experience all the much better.  

 

Some like to start out with some euros in hand; but ATMs are the easiest way to obtain euros once in Europe. 

 

Chicago should have plenty of flight options. Nonstop flights are the easiest on you -- shortest flight time and less scrambling through airports or worrying about connections. Flights over tend to be overnight, you will arrive in the morning. 

 

Pickpockets are crafty and prevalent but not violent. You won't need tae kwondo, just some street smarts. Do not keep ANYTHING valuable in an accessible pocket -- they will remove it. Leave excess cash, an extra credit card and your passport in your hotel or room safe. Consider a cash belt or secret (interior pocket). I'm not a big fan of the security purses (like Pac Safe) but they give some people a sense of security. Don't use a backpack either -- too easy to access or even grab them and some sites and museums do not allow them anyway.

 

 

12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

 

Sister and I are considering VRBO in central city.  Are there markets near by to pick up staples for the apartment/ VRBO?  Are there any hotels that you would recommend in city central?  budget of $100/night of less.  

 

What kind of budget should we plan for eating lunch dinner?

 

With your budget in the central city, I recommend looking for a VRBO. Rome is pricey. There are hotels around the main train station at that price, but you'll have to do a little more walking (or learn the metro system, which is not difficult, especially if you are from Chicago).

 

Many hotels include breakfast, or if you VRBO you can do your own. There are markets and small grocery stores in most neighborhoods, just look on Google when checking out neighborhoods to get an idea. If I'm trying to keep to a budget, I can generally eat a cheap lunch for around 10 euros ($12) or less for something like a slice of pizza or a panino sandwich and a soda or water.  This would be something cheap and more "on the go" -- not in a nice cafe by a piazza, mind you.  Dinner in a sit-down restaurant with a salad, pasta, house wine and bread might be 20-40 euro per person depending on location and if you have additional courses (antipasto, dessert, coffee, bottled water, etc)

 

12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

 

Sister wants to pick up some wine before the cruise.  Any suggestions? Will I need to pack a corkscrew?

 

I never travel without a corkscrew!  Don't put it in your carry on when flying. 

 

You can readily find inexpensive wine in any market, grocery, or even wine bars in Rome. Inexpensive wine is generally fine and drinkable but I wouldn't go for the cheapest option. Do you like white or red?

 

 

12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

 

How to avoid line at the Sistine Chapel?

 

You access the Sistine chapel only through the Vatican museum. Definitely plan ahead and purchase a timed ticket in advance at the official site, here:  https://tickets.museivaticani.va/home

 

Through the Vatican you can buy just your tickets and wander on your own or purchase a tour with an official guide, which use headphones and tend to be fairly large groups.  Or you can look at private tours, which are smaller but more expensive.  Guidebooks like Rick Steves have a ton of info on what your choices are.

 

 

12 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

 

Thanks again.  I really appreciate it!!

 

 

 

No problem, it's a pleasure to talk about traveling again instead of just COVID!

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Dear Cruisemom42, thank you so much for your expertise in planning.  For wine, it doesn't matter to me.  I would prefer a sweeter wine something like a moscato.  

 

We are planning mid Sept to late Sept.  Sister and I are early 60's and still in menopause 😠  We can't take the heat like we used to.  What will the weather be like?  I read you can't wear shorts in the Sistine Chapel.  I would prefer to wear shorts as we explore.  

 

We spent another 2 hours last night watching more of a almost 6 hour video showing a walking tour of Rome.  This is also helping us narrow down our must sees in Rome.  

 

One of the itineraries show going to izmir Turkey.  Have you been there?  We would love to do a port stop there as well. 

 

My must sees is Santorini since I've been to Italy before.  I want to go up to Oia and just drool at the views.  

 

Again, I thank you for your responses and input.

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2 hours ago, ROCruiser said:

I have a personal blog that recorded our trips. You are welcome to visit and see if you can find anything worthwhile. I am also starting to post videos, which I learned how to edit in the last few months. Still learning, so progress is slow. Here is my blog Homepage. Have a wonderful trip!

Dear ROCruiser, thanks so much for sharing your blog with me.  I see I have quite a bit of reading to do.  There are a lot of ports on your blog that I will be reading.  Thanks!

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9 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

I read you can't wear shorts in the Sistine Chapel.  I would prefer to wear shorts as we explore.  

 

The Vatican (and most churches in Italy) require knees and shoulders to be covered.  Temps should be in the 80s so light capri pants should work; I did Rome in August heat and that worked out well.

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6 hours ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

Dear ROCruiser, thanks so much for sharing your blog with me.  I see I have quite a bit of reading to do.  There are a lot of ports on your blog that I will be reading.  Thanks!

You are most welcome! Hope you can find some useful information there. Have a wonderful trip!

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On 1/11/2021 at 10:14 AM, Anyislandwilldo said:

I told my sister that there is A LOT to see in Rome and I thought 2 days would be suffice to check out the sites.  I had read also that staying in city central would be the best place to stay due to walking distance to most of the sites.  The Vatican is an outlier as you stated.  We would probably do that on the second day.  Sister wants to see the catacombs.  Do you have an opinion on those for her?

 

Do we exchange currency in US before arriving in Italy?  Any tips on flights??  We would be flying out of Chicago O'Hare.  Are the pick pockets really that bad?  

 

Sister and I are considering VRBO in central city.  Are there markets near by to pick up staples for the apartment/ VRBO?  Are there any hotels that you would recommend in city central?  budget of $100/night of less.  

 

What kind of budget should we plan for eating lunch dinner?

 

Sister wants to pick up some wine before the cruise.  Any suggestions? Will I need to pack a corkscrew?

 

A comment on your two days - they are not enough.  You will be arriving early in the morning and you will be jetlagged.  That's a fact.  Plan on walking around and seeing some sights like the Fontana de Trevi, going into the Pantheon, etc. until you get tired, have dinner and early night.  In the next two days, schedule the Vatican one day and the Colosseum and Forum the other day, with other places of interest and enjoying sidewalk cafes around those.  That means that you need to plan on three nights in Rome.  If you want to add the catacombs or maybe go to Trevi, add another night.  Renting through VRBO should make those 3 or 4 nights possible.  Look for info on shared shuttles to go to the ship on the fourth day.  

 

Be very mindful of opening times.  The Colosseum is open every day, the Vatican is closed Sundays, etc. Get advanced tickets for all.  The clothing advice is important.  Cover knees and shoulders in all churches.  (This also applies for men, in theory.)  Capris and short sleeves will do it.

 

The Vatican is somewhat of an outlier in the sense that it would take you an extra 20-30 minutes to walk there.  You should take a taxi to get to the museum half hour before your appointed time.  If you take the tour that include St Peter's (and you should), you can walk back to the other side of the river and look for a cafe or pizza to have lunch on the way.  You can visit the Castel Sant'Angelo before you cross the river. 

 

There are plenty of ATMs at the airport.  Use one as soon as you get there to get your euros.  There are also plenty of ATMs all over Rome.  For security, use one located at a bank.  It is best if you have ATM cards from two different accounts in case you lose one or it gets blocked. (Plenty of info on this board about this.)

 

As for pickpockets, use the same precautions you use in Chicago.  Always keep your purse across your body,  don't hang it from chairs in the restaurants or put them down under the table.  Your DH should keep his wallet in a front pocket. 

 

Rome is awash in wine.  You can find it in all grocery stores, trattorias, etc. 

 

The weather in September will be fine.  Best time to go. 

 

Other ports: 

Izmir is very interesting, but if you have a choice, pick a cruise that stops at Kusadasi instead.  It is a lot closer to Ephesus.

 

You will never get to Palermo from Messina in a day.  There are cruises that stop in Palermo or close to it.  If your option is Messina, then use that day to go to Taormina and/or Mt. Etna.  Messina itself is ok, but it doesn't compare to the others. 

 

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2 hours ago, marazul said:

A comment on your two days - they are not enough.  You will be arriving early in the morning and you will be jetlagged.  That's a fact.  Plan on walking around and seeing some sights like the Fontana de Trevi, going into the Pantheon, etc. until you get tired, have dinner and early night.  In the next two days, schedule the Vatican one day and the Colosseum and Forum the other day, with other places of interest and enjoying sidewalk cafes around those.  That means that you need to plan on three nights in Rome.  If you want to add the catacombs or maybe go to Trevi, add another night.  Renting through VRBO should make those 3 or 4 nights possible.  Look for info on shared shuttles to go to the ship on the fourth day.  

 

Be very mindful of opening times.  The Colosseum is open every day, the Vatican is closed Sundays, etc. Get advanced tickets for all.  The clothing advice is important.  Cover knees and shoulders in all churches.  (This also applies for men, in theory.)  Capris and short sleeves will do it.

 

The Vatican is somewhat of an outlier in the sense that it would take you an extra 20-30 minutes to walk there.  You should take a taxi to get to the museum half hour before your appointed time.  If you take the tour that include St Peter's (and you should), you can walk back to the other side of the river and look for a cafe or pizza to have lunch on the way.  You can visit the Castel Sant'Angelo before you cross the river. 

 

There are plenty of ATMs at the airport.  Use one as soon as you get there to get your euros.  There are also plenty of ATMs all over Rome.  For security, use one located at a bank.  It is best if you have ATM cards from two different accounts in case you lose one or it gets blocked. (Plenty of info on this board about this.)

 

As for pickpockets, use the same precautions you use in Chicago.  Always keep your purse across your body,  don't hang it from chairs in the restaurants or put them down under the table.  Your DH should keep his wallet in a front pocket. 

 

Rome is awash in wine.  You can find it in all grocery stores, trattorias, etc. 

 

The weather in September will be fine.  Best time to go. 

 

Other ports: 

Izmir is very interesting, but if you have a choice, pick a cruise that stops at Kusadasi instead.  It is a lot closer to Ephesus.

 

You will never get to Palermo from Messina in a day.  There are cruises that stop in Palermo or close to it.  If your option is Messina, then use that day to go to Taormina and/or Mt. Etna.  Messina itself is ok, but it doesn't compare to the others. 

 

Thank you so much for your valuable advice.  I will share with dear sister.

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1 hour ago, Anyislandwilldo said:

Thank you so much for your valuable advice.  I will share with dear sister.

Most cafes and neighborhood restaurants serve a house wine. Usually the choice is red or white. However, it can go for 4-6 euros a liter.  It will be listed on a blackboard or menu as, for example, "vino della casa 4e/1L". The wines are generally quite decent and 1 liter is just right to be shared by your group. And you can't beat the price.

This is quite common throughout Europe.

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2 hours ago, marazul said:

Most cafes and neighborhood restaurants serve a house wine. Usually the choice is red or white. However, it can go for 4-6 euros a liter.  It will be listed on a blackboard or menu as, for example, "vino della casa 4e/1L". The wines are generally quite decent and 1 liter is just right to be shared by your group. And you can't beat the price.

This is quite common throughout Europe.

 

Totally agree with this. In Italy in particular there seems to be a feeling that good wine needn't be expensive and should be available to all. Hallelujah. But seriously, most of the house wines are good accompaniments to the typical Italian food served in trattorias. If you go to a fancier place you may want to upscale your wine accordingly.

 

One other thing I thought I'd mention. When I spent some time in Rome with my mom, she expressed a fear of going to "nicer" restaurants because she was afraid we would get looked down on if we didn't order every course -- Antipasti (the “starter"), Primi (usually a pasta, but smaller servings than in the US), Secondi (your meat or fish), Contorni (side dishes like roasted potatoes, or fried artichokes), Insalata (salad), Formaggi e frutta (cheese & fruit plate), Dolce (sweet dessert).  

 

Trust me, neither tourists nor locals eat like this whenever they go out. On a special occasion, yes. But no one will bat an eye if you just go in and order a salad and a pasta.

 

 

 

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On 1/12/2021 at 6:21 AM, Anyislandwilldo said:

Dear Cruisemom42, thank you so much for your expertise in planning.  For wine, it doesn't matter to me.  I would prefer a sweeter wine something like a moscato.  

The wine in Italy is FABULOUS! My husband and Aunt stay with the sweeter ones,

but they fell in love with a (red) Sangiovese on a tour in a wine cellar! Yum! So, do

not limit yourself.

 

We are planning mid Sept to late Sept.  Sister and I are early 60's and still in menopause 😠  We can't take the heat like we used to.  What will the weather be like?  I read you can't wear shorts in the Sistine Chapel.  I would prefer to wear shorts as we explore.  

We went in mid October and Italy and Greece were quite warm. But we are from the Pacific Northwest.

 

 

 

And please; 2 nights is NOT enough. As has been noted, your first day/ night is acclimating

and possible taking a nap. We strolled around the first afternoon/ evening and went to dinner.

 

The second day was fabulous; spent touring the Colosseum, Forum, and Palatine Hill.

The third (early morning) was spent touring the Vatican. In the late afternoon, we went

on a lovely Food Tour.

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On 1/12/2021 at 5:45 AM, cruisemom42 said:

 

The problem with the catacombs is their location -- not in the centr and not so easy to get to for someone not as experienced negotiating public transportation (bus, metro).  If the catacombs are a must, you could consider a tour that picks up/drops off at your hotel, but it will take 1/2 a day of your two days. Again, I would really recommend 3 days in Rome. Also, consider timing -- there are 3 main catacombs on the Appian Way and they are not all open every day. One is closed on Sunday, one on Wednesday, and so on...

 

Check for additional info and tour suggestions at a site such as this one:   https://www.rometoolkit.com/whattodo/catacombs.html

 

 

 

Yes, I've been to Sicily a number of times. Unfortunately Messina and Palermo are quite a distance apart, almost at opposite ends of the island, about a 3 hour drive -- too far to visit on a one-day port stop. You'd spend nearly 6 hours just driving. 

 

 

 

Most restaurants post menus at the podium. Fair warning that the ones located on more picturesque piazzas (like Piazza Navona, Campo dei Fiori, etc.) are priced to reflect the superior views. Food tends to be very traditional Italian in many cases, things like pasta carbonara or amatriciana or chicken cacciatore. Pizza is Roman style -- very thin, almost crisp crust and limited toppings. Bread tends to be given to you, but there is usually a small charge for it, don't be surprised, it is normal.

 

If eating outdoors, keep a close eye on your belongings -- don't put a purse or jacket (with phone in pocket) on the back of your chair -- due to pickpockets. 

 

 

 

Some like to start out with some euros in hand; but ATMs are the easiest way to obtain euros once in Europe. 

 

Chicago should have plenty of flight options. Nonstop flights are the easiest on you -- shortest flight time and less scrambling through airports or worrying about connections. Flights over tend to be overnight, you will arrive in the morning. 

 

Pickpockets are crafty and prevalent but not violent. You won't need tae kwondo, just some street smarts. Do not keep ANYTHING valuable in an accessible pocket -- they will remove it. Leave excess cash, an extra credit card and your passport in your hotel or room safe. Consider a cash belt or secret (interior pocket). I'm not a big fan of the security purses (like Pac Safe) but they give some people a sense of security. Don't use a backpack either -- too easy to access or even grab them and some sites and museums do not allow them anyway.

 

 

 

With your budget in the central city, I recommend looking for a VRBO. Rome is pricey. There are hotels around the main train station at that price, but you'll have to do a little more walking (or learn the metro system, which is not difficult, especially if you are from Chicago).

 

Many hotels include breakfast, or if you VRBO you can do your own. There are markets and small grocery stores in most neighborhoods, just look on Google when checking out neighborhoods to get an idea. If I'm trying to keep to a budget, I can generally eat a cheap lunch for around 10 euros ($12) or less for something like a slice of pizza or a panino sandwich and a soda or water.  This would be something cheap and more "on the go" -- not in a nice cafe by a piazza, mind you.  Dinner in a sit-down restaurant with a salad, pasta, house wine and bread might be 20-40 euro per person depending on location and if you have additional courses (antipasto, dessert, coffee, bottled water, etc)

 

 

I never travel without a corkscrew!  Don't put it in your carry on when flying. 

 

You can readily find inexpensive wine in any market, grocery, or even wine bars in Rome. Inexpensive wine is generally fine and drinkable but I wouldn't go for the cheapest option. Do you like white or red?

 

 

 

You access the Sistine chapel only through the Vatican museum. Definitely plan ahead and purchase a timed ticket in advance at the official site, here:  https://tickets.museivaticani.va/home

 

Through the Vatican you can buy just your tickets and wander on your own or purchase a tour with an official guide, which use headphones and tend to be fairly large groups.  Or you can look at private tours, which are smaller but more expensive.  Guidebooks like Rick Steves have a ton of info on what your choices are.

 

 

 

No problem, it's a pleasure to talk about traveling again instead of just COVID!

 

Wow, this was very helpful. Thanks a lot 

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On 1/12/2021 at 7:18 PM, mchell810 said:

 

The Vatican (and most churches in Italy) require knees and shoulders to be covered.  Temps should be in the 80s so light capri pants should work; I did Rome in August heat and that worked out well.

Wear Cargo Pants.  Light and zip off legs.

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