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The Daily for Saturday Mar 20, 2021


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9 minutes ago, lazey1 said:

Rich, your Boots looks just like my Lucky down to the 1 white eyebrow. Lucky refused to east with my calico Silky today and I had to take her foodbowl into another room where she did gobble it up.

 

Wonderful collection of days here although I am a bibliophile. I have always preferred paperback books which I donate to local hospitals after I finish them. The only collection of books I have ever kept is the works of Tony Hillerman and now his daughter Anne Hillerman about the southwest especially the Navajo Indian traditions.

Tony and Anne Hillerman's books are wonderful.  I've learned quite a bit about the Navajo traditions.

 

I like your idea of donating books to local hospitals.  I usually take mine to a book exchange, which gives some credit on each book brought in.  That help's fund my book habit.  😁

 

Lenda

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1 hour ago, Quartzsite Cruiser said:

Tony and Anne Hillerman's books are wonderful.  I've learned quite a bit about the Navajo traditions.

 

I like your idea of donating books to local hospitals.  I usually take mine to a book exchange, which gives some credit on each book brought in.  That help's fund my book habit.  😁

 

Lenda

I have kept my Tony Hillerman books and also those by his daughter. Many years ago at the college here in Durango (Fort Lewis College) we had a program where Freshman writing was taught in various departments by the departmental  faculty members. I taught a Freshman Seminar called "Anthropology through Murder". I used  some of his early books and Tony came and gave presentations to my classes several different times over the years. We have a very large contingent of Native American students at the college since by  treaty we give free tuition and many of those students were and still are, Navajo. The students always loved his presentations.

 

Susan

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Good Afternoon All!

Another beautiful day here. And lots of pollen is in the air.

 

@XBGuy Stopped by the Farm Store after getting my second Covid vaccine at CPP Covid Vaccine Hub and got the most wonderful fresh produce, grown by the students. And got some “especially made for CPP” pumpkin butter as a love gift for DH. He hasn’t been there-yet. We plan to take a little ride there in a few weeks to pick out our tomato plants (my gosh, they off > 100 varieties). Thanks for mentioning the place, as we would not have known.

 

So it’s time to start making empanadas de pino for tonight. Along with a salad and Malbec, and either dulce de leche or passion fruit gelato completes tonight’s dinner plan. 

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13 minutes ago, durangoscots said:

I have kept my Tony Hillerman books and also those by his daughter. Many years ago at the college here in Durango (Fort Lewis College) we had a program where Freshman writing was taught in various departments by the departmental  faculty members. I taught a Freshman Seminar called "Anthropology through Murder". I used  some of his early books and Tony came and gave presentations to my classes several different times over the years. We have a very large contingent of Native American students at the college since by  treaty we give free tuition and many of those students were and still are, Navajo. The students always loved his presentations.

 

Susan

The seminar you taught sounds very interesting.  I took a couple of anthropology classes as electives and enjoyed them.  And I like a good murder mystery.  It would have been interesting to have heard Tony’s presentations.  I was thrilled when Anne continued the series.

 

Lenda

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16 minutes ago, TiogaCruiser said:

 

@XBGuy Stopped by the Farm Store after getting my second Covid vaccine at CPP Covid Vaccine Hub and got the most wonderful fresh produce, grown by the students. And got some “especially made for CPP” pumpkin butter as a love gift for DH. He hasn’t been there-yet. We plan to take a little ride there in a few weeks to pick out our tomato plants (my gosh, they off > 100 varieties). Thanks for mentioning the place, as we would not have known.

 

 

Yes, Mrs. XBGuy loves to buy tomato (and pepper) plants there. 

 

One thing I cannot understand is how they can get potted bearded iris to bloom.  When I plant bearded iris in a pot, all I get is leaves.

 

On Monday we made our first visit to a grocery store (Trader Joe's) in over a year.  Mrs. XBGuy is becoming more confident.  So, maybe we'll visit the Cal Poly Farm Store soon.

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18 minutes ago, XBGuy said:

Yes, Mrs. XBGuy loves to buy tomato (and pepper) plants there

 

Hot peppers?  I’m giving some of my chilies (babies) away to neighbours.  Too bad you weren’t closer - I’m happy to share 😉 

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4 hours ago, Vict0riann said:

Good morning, all - Spring equinox - should we be checking to make sure the sun rising and setting happen at  exactly 12 hours apart?

 

Science-y #nerdalert !!     Actually you'll find today in Victoria, BC that your day length is 12hrs 10.5mins ...  and that is b/c sunrise is determined as the time when the leading of the sun rises above the eastern horizon plane, and sunset is when the sun is when the trailing edge is no longer visible on the western horizon.  Your equinox / equilux was actually back on 17th March (day length of 12hrs and 46 seconds).   Sorry you missed it  🙂   hehe.   

 

Also, the closer one is to the equator (in the northern hemisphere), the further away equal parts of day / night are from when vernal / autumnal equinox actually is.  

 

image.png.f0aa01dc4cca0754abb6f4d15ebad00d.png

 

source:  https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/canada/victoria

 

Scott. 

 

 

 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, kazu said:

 

Hot peppers?  I’m giving some of my chilies (babies) away to neighbours.  Too bad you weren’t closer - I’m happy to share 😉 

 

Both hot and sweet.

 

Geographic distance notwithstanding, your kind offer is much appreciated.

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51 minutes ago, XBGuy said:

 

Both hot and sweet.

 

Geographic distance notwithstanding, your kind offer is much appreciated.

 

It’s easy to be kind when your seeds have been prolific 😉. (Other than the ones I saved last year 😡)

 

55FE165D-A397-4917-B63A-AFC03AE0EF51.thumb.jpeg.f94a9956fd229432dbd5ade84a5d833b.jpeg

 

D54CE9B7-377D-4310-9B69-48018BE7A726.thumb.jpeg.a44b26e017eeb39c64fcba7fce4981d7.jpeg

 

I think I will test the deer and see if they want to eat Serrano chilies and put a couple in my front garden.  I have no room for all of these babies - but I’ll find a way or a home for them. 🙂 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, XBGuy said:

One thing I cannot understand is how they can get potted bearded iris to bloom.  When I plant bearded iris in a pot, all I get is leaves.

 

Rhizomal iris (iris germanica) needs cold dormancy -- which is tricky in SoCal -- but think forcing tulips / daffodils. Let your greens nourish the rhizome all summer long.  Come fall - October-ish -- cut them back so there is about 3" green left above the rhizome.  Let dry out a bit ( a couple  weeks) in their pot(s).  Then, de-pot, brush off the soil, and put in hamster bedding (wood shavings) in a paper grocery bag. Your timing should be a bit before US Thanksgiving.  Stick in your beer fridge (you want temps below 40F / 5C)  Bring them out about this time in the spring. Pot up, and place in full sun.  You should have better luck.    Scott.      

 

 

Edited by YXU AC*SE
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8 minutes ago, YXU AC*SE said:

 

Rhizomal iris (iris germanica) needs cold dormancy -- which is tricky in SoCal -- but think forcing tulips / daffodils. Let your greens nourish the rhizome all summer long.  Come fall - October-ish -- cut them back so there is about 3" green left above the rhizome.  Let dry out a bit ( a couple  weeks) in their pot(s).  Then, de-pot, brush off the soil, and put in hamster bedding (wood shavings) in a paper grocery bag. Your timing should be a bit before US Thanksgiving.  Stick in your beer fridge (you want temps below 40F / 5C)  Bring them out about this time in the spring. Pot up, and place in full sun.  You should have better luck.    Scott.      

 

 

 

Thanks, Scott.

 

To be honest, much more work than I'm interested in.  I'll just plant them in Terra Firma and take my chances.

 

The other thing I have observed, though, is that they need a fair amount of springtime rain.  This season has been incredibly dry.  So, I am not very optimistic.

 

On the other hand, some people have real problems.

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16 minutes ago, YXU AC*SE said:

Then, de-pot, brush off the soil, and put in hamster bedding (wood shavings) in a paper grocery bag.

 

Finally, someone who doesn’t use vermiculite 🙂. totally agree on the cedar shavings.  All my bulbs I store all winter go in those - dahlias, cannas, callas, begonias, etc.

 

The best thing you can do for any bulb IME.

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5 minutes ago, XBGuy said:

On the other hand, some people have real problems.

 

#socalproblems     oh to not have winter  LOL     Scott. 

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So far, nobody has been to Dili.  For what it's worth I checked cruisetables and saw Seabourn had a couple of visits there.  Did not really find a lot on their website but a description of one of their tours might give a bit of a clue.  It;s called East Timor Explorer and Chisto Rei Beach.  The last line got to me.

 

East Timor's pleasant capital of Dili welcomes you. The surrounding hills are lush and green, and the town features many historical buildings, monuments and religious places. Watch for the Government Palace, Casa Europa (which was the original Portuguese military garrison built in 1769), and the Prince Henry the Navigator Monument.

Further south, you will arrive at the Santa Cruz Cemetery -- one the most important worship sites in East Timor and best known for the massacre that took the lives of approximately 250 youths in 1991.

Travel up through the foothills surrounding Dili and stop at the Dare War Museum.

A morning snack of Timor coffee and home-baked cakes is served at the Australian World War II Memorial & Museum located in Dare. The memorial was built in 1969 by the Australian Diggers -- veterans of World War II. It was dedicated to the Timorese people for their support for the Australian soldiers against the occupying Japanese forces from 1942-1945.

Back in town, your guide will point out the National Parliament building and the Timorese Resistance Archive & Museum. The latter was built in 2005 and is dedicated to the Timorese Resistance's 24-year struggle for Independence from Indonesia.

Visit the Xanana Cultural Center -- originally the Xanana Reading Room. It is home to a public library, bookshop and exhibition spaces showcasing a permanent collection of photographs and paintings, awards and presentations made to Xanana Gusmao, tais and cultural artifacts. Xanana was a resistance fighter whose trenches were the rugged jungles and mountains of East Timor. He was imprisoned in Indonesia during the 1990s and is a national hero.

Don't miss the arts and crafts market at the Lecidere East Market -- individual items are sold here and it's a great place to pick up souvenirs.

A BBQ lunch is served under the shady trees on the beautiful white-sand Cristo Rei Beach on Areia Branca Bay. The afternoon is now yours to enjoy in this tropical paradise. Relax on the beach, swim or kayak in the bay, join a guided walking tour up to the top of the Jesus statue, or explore underwater. East Timor sits in the heart of the Indo-Pacific coral triangle, so a guided snorkel tour is a brilliant introduction to the sub-marine world here.

Notes: Wear your swimsuit under your clothing; bring a towel, reef-safe/biodegradable sunscreen and a hat. Wear your swimsuit under your clothing; bring a towel, reef-safe/biodegradable sunscreen and a hat. The road to the beach is quite bumpy and not suitable for guests with back / neck problems. There are no chairs, tables, sunbeds or changing facilities at any of the beaches visited.

Due to the fact that Dili is in full development, there are no tour buses yet. Instead, the best possible vehicles in town are being sourced. Due to the lack of professional guides in Dili, your tour guides will be university students that are in training to become professional guides.  

 

Roy

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Thank you Rich and Roy for all the information you provide each day. 

Rich, Boots looks to be a lovely cat, pleased to have found you.

Roy, when do you expect to be advised of the date for your Surgery?

We have not been to the port of the day.

Keep well stay safe everyone.

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2 minutes ago, erewhon said:

Thank you Rich and Roy for all the information you provide each day. 

Rich, Boots looks to be a lovely cat, pleased to have found you.

Roy, when do you expect to be advised of the date for your Surgery?

We have not been to the port of the day.

Keep well stay safe everyone.

I'm a candidate for one of 2 investigational procedures.  Right now we are waiting to hear from one of the sponsors.

 

Roy

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7 minutes ago, rafinmd said:

I'm a candidate for one of 2 investigational procedures.  Right now we are waiting to hear from one of the sponsors.

 

Roy

 

Thanks for your reply, guess that could take quite a long time

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Posted (edited)

Good evening everyone!  Thank you for the Daily Rich @richwmn and Leo and Callie must be spreading the word that you and your house is a great place to live. Boots looks quite at home, poor thing, must have been so hungry. 
 

Thank you for your lists Roy and pictures and meal suggestion. And thank you for the description of today’s port, which I’ve never heard of before. 
 

I’m late today, it was our monthly yard day which was actually a week late because we postponed it last Saturday due to the snow. They were late today but that’s okay, not really too much to do. Also DGD is here and she can talk your ear off. 
 

Great collection of days. DH is the book reader of the family. He has several bookstores he visits regularly and one of them takes books (and other things) back for credit toward future purchases. 
 

We love ham here and I just bought a ham steak but it’s for split pea soup (the meal suggestion a few days ago). I’m going to make it sometime this week. Tomorrow rabbit is on the menu courtesy of DH.  Rabbit ragout over pasta.  He will do the cooking but I will have to shred it for him.  The rabbit he bought is from Montreal and the label is mostly in French. 😊
 

Have a great evening everyone!

Edited by Sharon in AZ
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1 hour ago, rafinmd said:

So far, nobody has been to Dili.  For what it's worth I checked cruisetables and saw Seabourn had a couple of visits there.  Did not really find a lot on their website but a description of one of their tours might give a bit of a clue.  It;s called East Timor Explorer and Chisto Rei Beach.  The last line got to me.

 

East Timor's pleasant capital of Dili welcomes you. The surrounding hills are lush and green, and the town features many historical buildings, monuments and religious places. Watch for the Government Palace, Casa Europa (which was the original Portuguese military garrison built in 1769), and the Prince Henry the Navigator Monument.

Further south, you will arrive at the Santa Cruz Cemetery -- one the most important worship sites in East Timor and best known for the massacre that took the lives of approximately 250 youths in 1991.

Travel up through the foothills surrounding Dili and stop at the Dare War Museum.

A morning snack of Timor coffee and home-baked cakes is served at the Australian World War II Memorial & Museum located in Dare. The memorial was built in 1969 by the Australian Diggers -- veterans of World War II. It was dedicated to the Timorese people for their support for the Australian soldiers against the occupying Japanese forces from 1942-1945.

Back in town, your guide will point out the National Parliament building and the Timorese Resistance Archive & Museum. The latter was built in 2005 and is dedicated to the Timorese Resistance's 24-year struggle for Independence from Indonesia.

Visit the Xanana Cultural Center -- originally the Xanana Reading Room. It is home to a public library, bookshop and exhibition spaces showcasing a permanent collection of photographs and paintings, awards and presentations made to Xanana Gusmao, tais and cultural artifacts. Xanana was a resistance fighter whose trenches were the rugged jungles and mountains of East Timor. He was imprisoned in Indonesia during the 1990s and is a national hero.

Don't miss the arts and crafts market at the Lecidere East Market -- individual items are sold here and it's a great place to pick up souvenirs.

A BBQ lunch is served under the shady trees on the beautiful white-sand Cristo Rei Beach on Areia Branca Bay. The afternoon is now yours to enjoy in this tropical paradise. Relax on the beach, swim or kayak in the bay, join a guided walking tour up to the top of the Jesus statue, or explore underwater. East Timor sits in the heart of the Indo-Pacific coral triangle, so a guided snorkel tour is a brilliant introduction to the sub-marine world here.

Notes: Wear your swimsuit under your clothing; bring a towel, reef-safe/biodegradable sunscreen and a hat. Wear your swimsuit under your clothing; bring a towel, reef-safe/biodegradable sunscreen and a hat. The road to the beach is quite bumpy and not suitable for guests with back / neck problems. There are no chairs, tables, sunbeds or changing facilities at any of the beaches visited.

Due to the fact that Dili is in full development, there are no tour buses yet. Instead, the best possible vehicles in town are being sourced. Due to the lack of professional guides in Dili, your tour guides will be university students that are in training to become professional guides.  

 

Roy

  I am booked on the Oosterdam and hoping to be there on Dec 1, 2021.  This is a tour that HAL offers called "Dili Highlights"  which is 4 hours and $169.  The other tours offered are mostly in the $250 range.

About the Excursion

 

Leaving the ship, you'll travel south through the central business district of East Timor's laid-back capital of Dili, which has taken on a new lease on life since Independence in 2002. The city is nestled into the base of the surrounding hills, which are lush and green in the rainy season. Watch for the many historical buildings, monuments and religious places that line the streets, including the Government Palace, Casa Europa (which was the original Portuguese military garrison built in 1769), and the Prince Henry the Navigator Monument.

Your first stop is at the Xanana Cultural Center -- originally the Xanana Reading Room. It is home to a public library, bookshop and exhibition spaces showcasing a permanent collection of photographs and paintings. Xanana was a resistance fighter whose trenches were the rugged jungles and mountains of East Timor. He was imprisoned in Indonesia during the 1990s and is a national hero.

Watch an exclusive cultural performance by the Le-Ziaval group, established by Timorese students living in Indonesia during the late 1990s. They adopted an alternative form of protest, keeping Timorese culture alive through dance and music.

Your guide will point out the National Parliament building and the Timorese Resistance Archive & Museum. The latter was built in 2005 and is dedicated to the Timorese Resistance's 24-year struggle for Independence from Indonesia.

Further south, you will arrive at the Santa Cruz Cemetery -- one the most important worship sites in East Timor and best known for the massacre that took the lives of approximately 250 youths in 1991.

A morning snack of Timor coffee and home-baked cakes is served at the Australian World War II Memorial and Museum located in Dare. The memorial was built in 1969 by the Australian Diggers -- veterans of World War II. It was dedicated to the Timorese people for their support for the Australian soldiers against the occupying Japanese forces from 1942-1945.

Notes: Please be advised that the vehicles used for transporation have no air conditioning and limited leg space.

 

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Red Haired Lady said:

  I am booked on the Oosterdam and hoping to be there on Dec 1, 2021.  This is a tour that HAL offers called "Dili Highlights"  which is 4 hours and $169.  The other tours offered are mostly in the $250 range.

About the Excursion

 

Leaving the ship, you'll travel south through the central business district of East Timor's laid-back capital of Dili, which has taken on a new lease on life since Independence in 2002. The city is nestled into the base of the surrounding hills, which are lush and green in the rainy season. Watch for the many historical buildings, monuments and religious places that line the streets, including the Government Palace, Casa Europa (which was the original Portuguese military garrison built in 1769), and the Prince Henry the Navigator Monument.

Your first stop is at the Xanana Cultural Center -- originally the Xanana Reading Room. It is home to a public library, bookshop and exhibition spaces showcasing a permanent collection of photographs and paintings. Xanana was a resistance fighter whose trenches were the rugged jungles and mountains of East Timor. He was imprisoned in Indonesia during the 1990s and is a national hero.

Watch an exclusive cultural performance by the Le-Ziaval group, established by Timorese students living in Indonesia during the late 1990s. They adopted an alternative form of protest, keeping Timorese culture alive through dance and music.

Your guide will point out the National Parliament building and the Timorese Resistance Archive & Museum. The latter was built in 2005 and is dedicated to the Timorese Resistance's 24-year struggle for Independence from Indonesia.

Further south, you will arrive at the Santa Cruz Cemetery -- one the most important worship sites in East Timor and best known for the massacre that took the lives of approximately 250 youths in 1991.

A morning snack of Timor coffee and home-baked cakes is served at the Australian World War II Memorial and Museum located in Dare. The memorial was built in 1969 by the Australian Diggers -- veterans of World War II. It was dedicated to the Timorese people for their support for the Australian soldiers against the occupying Japanese forces from 1942-1945.

Notes: Please be advised that the vehicles used for transporation have no air conditioning and limited leg space.

Looks like your tour is much like Seabourn's but without their beach break and about $100 less.  Sadly, I doubt that Australia will open up by December.

 

Roy

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