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Fla. says no to cruise line vaccine requirements


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That’s unfortunate.  

 

I guess the flip side of that is it’s really good news for ports like New Orleans, Galveston, LA, NYC, Bahamas, and Jamaica....maybe even Haiti.  They will absorb those cruises as an origination and end point that used to sail out of FL.

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59 minutes ago, graphicguy said:

That’s unfortunate.  

 

I guess the flip side of that is it’s really good news for ports like New Orleans, Galveston, LA, NYC, Bahamas, and Jamaica....maybe even Haiti.  They will absorb those cruises as an origination and end point that used to sail out of FL.


The fact that NCL will require vaccinations before sailing..is a positive. (All the other cruise lines will follow with that soon enough as well)

The possibility that cruising *may* be able to start up again fairly soon is also a positive.

 

If in the end there are more cruises that start and stop in ports outside of Florida is also a positive. (Actually that might be the cherry on top  😉)

Edited by Red-Sol
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21 minutes ago, ukbecky said:

 those who choose NOT to get the Pfizer or Moderna shots. People weigh the risks and some choose no. 

People make their choices with the knowledge that there are consequences related to said choices.   People opting to not get vaccinated do so knowing that probably:

 

1. They won't be going on a cruise out of the US anytime soon even once cruises restart from USA ports.

2.  They will be quite limited in what their international travel options will be.  Many countries may not allow foreigners in that do not have proof of vaccination.  

3.  Even road trips to Canada may not be available to them if Canada requires proof of vaccine to allow entry once the border fully re-opens.

4.  They may end up catching COVID-19....getting very sick....and maybe even not surviving the illness.

 

 

 

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It's really simple.  NCL has chosen to be as COVID responsible as they can.  They've installed sophisticated air filtration systems that kills airborne COVID viruses, they're requiring crew and passengers to be vaccinated.  I'm sure they've probably either replaced, or totally sanitized all surfaces inside and outside of their ships.

 

They're making plans to sail from ports who embrace their COVID savy safety measures.  This is a positive and probably something they can use as a marketing too, also.

 

The FL ports will lose out and the other Caribbean, Bahamian, and Gulf ports will be the winners.

 

People's health and well being are non-negotiable.  If FL is using this as a negotiation tactic, it's obviously a loser.  But, it's a winner for the other, non-FL ports, as they'll get that business.

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3 hours ago, Darcy03231 said:

I wouldn't be surprised if the countries the cruise is visiting make vaccination a requirement.

For sure! I would guess that most/all islands/countries (Especially North America and Caribbean) will do exactly that.

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There may be some legal scholars that may know more about this subject than I do, but I am not sure Gov. DeSantis has ultimate authority in this matter.  I believe cruise lines would fall under interstate or more likely, international commerce and as such would fall under Federal Government jurisdiction. State and local governments certainly have some say in the matter and can impose certain requirements on cruise lines, as long as they don't conflict with federal law. 

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Get the cruises started first with vaccines (even though I disagree with it). Once sailing get the restriction lifted for vaccines to only those that are eligible to have it (i.e. kids that don't meet the age requirements).

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Business is free to make their own choices for religious reasons, but not health reasons is one of the stupidest things I've ever heard. 

 

DeSantis is an idiot. Regardless of if you agree with NCL decision, they are doing what they have to do. 

 

 

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Think Bahamas, Caribbean, Bermuda, Mexico, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, etc won’t make the cruise lines’ origination points in their ports as appealing as possible?  Think, again!  They’ll make it so appealing it will be tough for FL to get that lost business back any time soon.

 

And, for what?  Some politicians’ ego who’s more in love with power than what’s best for his state?

 

2, 3 years from now, stinging from the loss of the cruise revenue for FL has been painfully felt for a bit, and seeing that revenue permanently flow to other locales, mark this date and time as to when and why that revenue was lost (maybe permanently). 

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It might be worth taking a look at the cruise lines planning to sail in the UK this summer. Most are requiring vaccines, but not all. MSC isn't. Personally, I'm of the belief that cruise lines ought to be able to discriminate against anyone, but that's just me. 😃

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18 hours ago, Torence said:

There may be some legal scholars that may know more about this subject than I do, but I am not sure Gov. DeSantis has ultimate authority in this matter.  I believe cruise lines would fall under interstate or more likely, international commerce and as such would fall under Federal Government jurisdiction. State and local governments certainly have some say in the matter and can impose certain requirements on cruise lines, as long as they don't conflict with federal law. 

"Newspaper legal analysts" seem to concur that he does not have that power.

I took just a quick glance at his executive order and he's relying on emergency powers in order to issue the order.  Businesses asking for vaccinated customers hardly seems to fall into what a reasonable person would consider to be an emergency. 

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3 minutes ago, D C said:

"Newspaper legal analysts" seem to concur that he does not have that power.

I took just a quick glance at his executive order and he's relying on emergency powers in order to issue the order.  Businesses asking for vaccinated customers hardly seems to fall into what a reasonable person would consider to be an emergency. 

He likely does not have the authority, but that might be beside the point. The governor enjoys broad public support for his actions and that puts businesses in a tough spot since any attempt to push back on the order will probably meet with public resistance. That might be what he is counting on.

 

As far as discrimination, it wasn't too long ago that the Supreme Court said a bakery in Colorado could refuse service to certain customers on First Amendment grounds. While it's not clear that extends to this situation, it would be hard to see it going the other way here since the intent of the governor's order is to reopen the economy ("WHEREAS, it is necessary to protect the fundamental rights and privacies of Floridians and the free flow of commerce within the state").

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