Jump to content

Norway's Cruise Ship Tunnel Plan Explained


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, MeHeartCruising said:

Maybe it will work for others, but that link doesn't take me directly to the video you describe. 

 

It was "stolen" from Galveston.com Chat.  emo3.gif 

Try this: https://www.galveston.com/wp-content/chatpopout.html

 

There are ads before the video starts.

 

Edited by Host Kat
Additional information.
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dogs4fun said:

- when do they expect tunnel completion?

According to the Norwegian Coastal Administration (link to info in Norwegian language)

“The goal is to be able to contract a contractor during 2021, which will then give construction start in 2022.

If everything goes according to plan, the world's first full-scale ship tunnel will be ready in 2026”

https://www.kystverket.no/Nyheter/2021/februar/na-begynner-arbeidet-med-stad-skipstunnel/

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, MeHeartCruising said:

I finally figured out that this link takes you to the last few seconds of the video.  So if you use it, immediately reposition the video player back to the beginning. 

 

👍 👍  Both thumbs up! Thanks for the info!

 

6 hours ago, MeHeartCruising said:


I don’t think this link works unless you create an account and sign in to Galveston.com. 

 

 I'm not registered nor do I have an account there for the Chat. I'm just a lurker. 

 

I enjoyed the quips & puns in the video. Favorite is when talking about the 8 million tons of rock to be removed:

 

image.png.df3363286598e26f05a45e4e91989102.png

 

 

Edited to add: From the comments below the video...

 

"The frequent mention of cruise ships in relation to this tunnel refers to Norway's "coastal cruise route", Hurtigruten, which is somewhat of a hybrid between a cargo route and a cruise ship. It consists of a fleet of 11 ships continuously sailing the 11-day trip from Bergen to Kirkenes and back, visiting 34 ports of call along the way, carrying passengers and some cargo. In other words, each port is visited by one ship every day, carrying supplies to some of them which can't be reached by road..."

 

And...

 

"The maximum ship size of 60,000 tons is more for ferries than cruise ships. Very few modern cruise ships are less than 100,000 Gross Tons, so the tunnel isn't designed for them."

 

Edited by Host Kat
Additional information.
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Host Kat said:

Hurtigruten, which is somewhat of a hybrid between a cargo route and a cruise ship. It consists of a fleet of 11 ships continuously sailing the 11-day trip from Bergen to Kirkenes and back, visiting 34 ports of call along the way,

From January 1st 2021 Hurtigruten is only operating 7 of the 11 ships sailing at the Norwegian Coastal Route.

Havila Kystruten is now operating four ships - same timetable and same 34 ports along the route from Bergen to Kirkenes,

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with Barbara Muckermann, CMO Silversea Cruises
      • ICYM Our Cruise Critic Live Special Event: Explore the Remote World with Hurtigruten!
      • Q&A with the Quark Expeditions Team: New Ship Ultramarine
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...