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Well someone has to say it.... what is going to happen to Nassau cruises?


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4 minutes ago, not-enough-cruising said:

You are quoting 2 different statistics. Individuals having had one shot VS fully vaccinated. 

Correct..https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

 

single dose: 40.5% of US population; 51.5% of those = or > 18; 80.6% of those = or > 65

fully vaccinated: 26.4% of US population; 33.8% of those = or > 18; 80.6% of those = or > 65

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7 minutes ago, not-enough-cruising said:

You are quoting 2 different statistics. Individuals having had one shot VS fully vaccinated. 

no, he showed the bar graph of 2 shot, fully vaccinated (2 weeks after 2nd dose) and 1 shot people. Combine both the 1 shot and 2 shots categories gave you almost half the US eligible population. Per the CDC, 26.4% of the eligible population fully vaccinated and 40.5 at least one dose. 

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

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29 minutes ago, bouhunter said:

Over a year ago "science" said we just needed to stay home for a couple weeks to "flatten the curve".

Yea we see  how much of a lie that was.  Get the craps of hearing science, science.  Nobody knows anything.  

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15 minutes ago, Sky616 said:

Yea we see  how much of a lie that was.  Get the craps of hearing science, science.  Nobody knows anything.  

 

Funny thing about science is that as new information is learned, the things it results in investigating, trying or suggesting, also change accordingly.

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Covid is volatile and Nassau has absolutely no problem kicking out American tourists in the middle of their vacations as they did in July of 2020- which I totally understand. However, I’ll pass on booking a cruise leaving from their port. It’s a risk I’m not willing to take. 

33B52007-079A-47E2-99BF-CDF51D474604.jpeg

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17 hours ago, dswallow said:

 

Funny thing about science is that as new information is learned, the things it results in investigating, trying or suggesting, also change accordingly.

Agreed! I believe that's the view of many. Science changes its findings based on new information, and there's nothing wrong with that.

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8 hours ago, C_hasRedBottoms said:

Covid is volatile and Nassau has absolutely no problem kicking out American tourists in the middle of their vacations as they did in July of 2020- which I totally understand. However, I’ll pass on booking a cruise leaving from their port. It’s a risk I’m not willing to take. 

33B52007-079A-47E2-99BF-CDF51D474604.jpeg

There's a great irony to the use of this picture, BTW. 😉😆

(hint: Oprah owns a home in the Bahamas)

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On 4/20/2021 at 11:01 PM, Jimbo said:

Maybe pack a month or 2 extra of clothes.

It's the Bahamas. I could live in a bathing suit. It's the medications I would need to pack extra.

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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, Joebucks said:

 

Now go cram in a subway or Starbucks in NY.

The best thing to come out of covid is no crowds any place unless you are rioting.  People pitched a be-atch when the Long Island Railroad cut down on service causing train cars to become overcrowded. They immediately went back to full service.

Edited by Iamcruzin
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We returned on 3/29 from a 4 week vacation in the Dominican Republic. Airlines were 100% fill, even the middle seats. The resort was busy, although not at full capacity. People were cautious with mask wearing but did use reasonable judgement on beaches, golf course, restaurants, etc.  Travel is coming back  and I think the CDC doesn’t want us to know it

 

We had a great time, never was “scared” of the virus, and plan on returning in May.  

 

 

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19 hours ago, molly361 said:

Now we need the US for not require a COVID test in order to return if you are vaccinated

My wife and son returned from Florida last month. Both vaccinated fully. Neither of them needed a covid test or quarantine for return to NY so we are making strides. 

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3 hours ago, DCGuy64 said:

Agreed! I believe that's the view of many. Science changes its findings based on new information, and there's nothing wrong with that.

 

I thought it was a gesture for hands up - don't get the shot😟

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21 hours ago, dswallow said:

 

Funny thing about science is that as new information is learned, the things it results in investigating, trying or suggesting, also change accordingly.

 

 

Ugh yea thats the issue.  The science has changed but we aren't adapting.  Many are still living like its April of 2020....

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On 4/21/2021 at 11:10 AM, ilovetotravel1977 said:

Wait. You don't get coverage if you have to be medically air evacuated off a cruise ship?  wow!

 

Insurance is a personal decision as of now. We don't get it, doesnt make sense for us. That may change with time, who knows

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I was in Mexico last month, and will be sailing on Adventure out of Nassau in August.  
 

And was happy to find out that the Bahamas is no longer requiring a covid test prior to entry, as long as you can provide proof of vaccination!  

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Posted (edited)
On 4/21/2021 at 2:08 PM, wolfcathorse said:

that's funny because over on YouTube, Dr John Campbell in the UK showed data that only 23% of eligible US citizens have been fully vaccinated. His data comes from the CDC website. 

https://www.politico.com/news/2021/04/21/biden-businesses-covid-vaccines-484030

 

According to the CDC site - 50% of American Adults have had at least one shot.

or 137 MILLION 

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

 

Edited by M&A
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Posted (edited)
On 4/21/2021 at 12:50 PM, Tapi said:

I can confirm this. I’ve been traveling to Mexico (for work) frequently during the entire pandemic. Within the last few months, passenger loads have exploded. In fact, several airlines have upgraded service from narrow body 737’s and A320’s to wide body 787’s, 777’s and A330’s to accommodate the demand. The airport looks as busy (if not busier) than before the pandemic. Flights are packed, resorts are packed, beaches are packed, people are celebrating destination weddings, etc.

 

You’d never know that Mexico is at level 4 with a warning to avoid all travel. 

currently the US is at 60% of pre pandemic travel numbers.

image.thumb.png.da5d1f826004c12f17c993ab89645cc8.png

 

Spring  break travel helped a lot but buried deep in the data: Business and International travel, lucrative to airlines, is MIA.

https://www.tsa.gov/coronavirus/passenger-throughput

 

I saw a report in all of this about the flu shot being 47% effective after all these years and "improvements" each year. The problem with the data is its reported by Doctors and Hospitals when a patient calls his or her Dr for a prescription of goes to hospital as is severe. I caught what I thought was the flu in Dec 19 after a cruise to So America and the flight home. I did not report it as I was  back to normal after 3 days of cold and fever et al. The report I saw admitted the real effectiveness of the shot is down near 17%.

 

So now I question why get it.

 

I have had the 2 jabs already, however, I do have a degree of discomfort with my decision because , realistically, it is still in early trials.  A lot of people have bought in hook line and sinker, but its not as simple as that. Yeah, the WHO, NIH CDC and virtually all the media push for it, but anytime anybody raises a serious question about it the article get censored or the writer gets marginalized or taken down from twitter or FB. 

 

And the data now suggest that the ones not taking the shot are the younger folks, whom, if they do not have comorbidities should do fine.

 

And to be fair, with all the stats, we do not know who had covid and like flu, did not report it. There have been enough issues with covid reporting going al; ways, that it has become a bit of garbage in/garbage out.

 

In the end we are our own best advocates.

 

If a cruise is not safe enough for one's preference don't go.

If a cruise has too many restrictions for ones preferences, don't go.

 

Unfortunately for the cruise line, few of us can make the decisions cause there is too much up in the air and unknown.Blame it on CDC or the Cruise lines, I do not care.

 

All I care for a very specific issue about is resolving the issues so I either go on my cruises, or I get my money back. The back and forth BS is indicative of BS . And too bad if the CDC does not have enough people working there--they should  and cannot and should not have it as an excuse. Try that excuse in the business world and see how long you last.

 

But I have a question: why are all the big ships built overseas? And are there any dry docks in the US for periodic maintenance? Is it as simple  that our costs are too high?

 

Edited by HMR74
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1 minute ago, Biker19 said:

Along with regulation and host of other issues.

regulations drive costs higher, eg, OSHA, EPA. and while that might be good, other countries just do not have that or retirement or high litigation factors, or high medical costs.

 

Our cruise costs are going up substantially, and if cruise lines have more to do, then those costs go up higher.

A book and will be written on this, many books.

 

Its almost as if part of the govt has to create fiefdoms to justify their existence.

 

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, HMR74 said:

currently the US is at 60% of pre pandemic travel numbers.

Total throughput at airports nationwide is roughly at 60% of pre-pandemic numbers, but this percentage is not spread evenly among all routes. Some markets are lagging severely (for example, long haul international travel). Others are close to even (many domestic routes), while others destinations are outperforming pre pandemic levels. One of the markets doing better than before are leisure destinations (like Cancun). And this market is about to get a further boost this summer as demand for flights to outdoor, leisure destinations, both domestic and international, remains high.  

Edited by Tapi
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10 hours ago, M&A said:

https://www.politico.com/news/2021/04/21/biden-businesses-covid-vaccines-484030

 

According to the CDC site - 50% of American Adults have had at least one shot.

or 137 MILLION 

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

 

Here is another data issue. I read somewhere yesterday or  today that 91 or 94  million in the US have been vaccinated, however , the CDC claims in the same article that something like 280 million doses have been distributed, which would mean doses for 50 million are sitting around getting stale.

I get a news feed from Reuters, AP, Bloomberg, CNBC  and others all combined with each other but this one stood out in my mind just for the raw numbers. Then I got a call and I forgot about it.

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Tapi said:

Total throughput at airports nationwide is roughly at 60% of pre-pandemic numbers, but this percentage is not spread evenly among all routes. Some markets are lagging severely (for example, long haul international travel). Others are close to even (many domestic routes), while others destinations are outperforming pre pandemic levels. One of the markets doing better than before are leisure destinations (like Cancun). And this market is about to get a further boost this summer as demand for flights to outdoor, leisure destinations, both domestic and international, remains high.  

I think that's what I said, but do not forget the airlines have a lot of cheap fares out there and yes, travel to FL AZ Mexico is at a high level as few want to wear a mask for 10-20 hours. Those routes traffic will decline as weather and temps improve up north (but not for Canada)

American reported yesterday it has recalled all its pilots , but I wonder how many pilots this  past year just quit or retired.

 

Soundbites especially from the media are dangerous.

Edited by HMR74
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18 minutes ago, HMR74 said:

Here is another data issue. I read somewhere yesterday or  today that 91 or 94  million in the US have been vaccinated, however , the CDC claims in the same article that something like 280 million doses have been distributed, which would mean doses for 50 million are sitting around getting stale.

I get a news feed from Reuters, AP, Bloomberg, CNBC  and others all combined with each other but this one stood out in my mind just for the raw numbers. Then I got a call and I forgot about it.

 

Most of the difference is the doses allocated as second shots for those who so far have only had their first. And the one-dose Janssen vaccine has muddied the calculation a bit because of the temporary hold on administering it, and I'm a bit too tired right now to try to fully put everything into this post, but I think this is enough for you to see how the numbers close in better...

 

93,078,040 fully vaccinated, 8,058,239 are Janssen, so 85,019,80 are two-dose vaccinations.

85,019,801 x 2 + 8,058,239 = 178,097,841 doses administered to people fully vaccinated

 

85,019,801 x 2 = 170,039,602 two-dose vaccine doses administered to people fully vaccinated

118,628,496 + 98,778,973 = 217,407,469 two-dose vaccine doses administered

217,407,469 - 170,039,602 = 47,367,867 two-dose vaccine doses administered to people who have not received the second dose

149,623,305 + 123,421,200 = 273,044,505 tow-dose vaccine doses delivered

 

So that accounts for most of the difference, and then there's the Janssen doses that haven't been administered because they were held back temporarily yet were delivered.

 

There's also reporting lags (i.e., at any given time not every number in the system is in sync), as each jurisdiction reports at different times. I used the number from the capture of the page at CDC COVID Data Tracker which I included below.

 

Most of those doses have at least 6 months of shelf life, and will be used in the next 3 to 4 weeks as they're going mostly to people awaiting the second dose. In the meantime, new shipments will arrive for first doses, which themselves are good out for another 6 months or so, anyway.

 

screencapture-covid-cdc-gov-covid-data-tracker-2021-04-24-23_07_08.thumb.png.e3dfc68377608199ad3534e66fb2d9e8.png

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, dswallow said:

 

Most of the difference is the doses allocated as second shots for those who so far have only had their first. And the one-dose Janssen vaccine has muddied the calculation a bit because of the temporary hold on administering it, and I'm a bit too tired right now to try to fully put everything into this post, but I think this is enough for you to see how the numbers close in better...

 

93,078,040 fully vaccinated, 8,058,239 are Janssen, so 85,019,80 are two-dose vaccinations.

85,019,801 x 2 + 8,058,239 = 178,097,841 doses administered to people fully vaccinated

 

85,019,801 x 2 = 170,039,602 two-dose vaccine doses administered to people fully vaccinated

118,628,496 + 98,778,973 = 217,407,469 two-dose vaccine doses administered

217,407,469 - 170,039,602 = 47,367,867 two-dose vaccine doses administered to people who have not received the second dose

149,623,305 + 123,421,200 = 273,044,505 tow-dose vaccine doses delivered

 

So that accounts for most of the difference, and then there's the Janssen doses that haven't been administered because they were held back temporarily yet were delivered.

 

There's also reporting lags (i.e., at any given time not every number in the system is in sync), as each jurisdiction reports at different times. I used the number from the capture of the page at CDC COVID Data Tracker which I included below.

 

Most of those doses have at least 6 months of shelf life, and will be used in the next 3 to 4 weeks as they're going mostly to people awaiting the second dose. In the meantime, new shipments will arrive for first doses, which themselves are good out for another 6 months or so, anyway.

 

screencapture-covid-cdc-gov-covid-data-tracker-2021-04-24-23_07_08.thumb.png.e3dfc68377608199ad3534e66fb2d9e8.png

there also has to be 50 million"kids" under 18 in the country, I read 30 million in schools K-12. They do not get the vaccine. Not too sure the numbers of 19 to say 35 , most of whom who get the vaccine as their line of business or profession dictate it,

65+ should be a no brainer to get the vaccine even if questions and concerns, the net positive has to outweigh the negative.

That when I have discussed the risk rewards aspects, each person has hos or her own category  to figure it out on their own

 

That'a why herd immunity is in the 60-70% range.

15-20% of population are the kids who likely  will  not hey the virus, nor vaccine-so 80% is high considering it means everybody else which will not happen for various reason, mostly good reasons, eg they are in their 20's or even older, and the 30 mi or so who have already had it.

 

Back out the number and whomever is calling for 80% is saying everybody has to be vaccinated, and that will not fly.

 

Esp for a vaccine that's EUA

 

 

 

Edited by HMR74
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