Jump to content

Motion in the ocean


Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, MBP&O2/O said:

 

I have been in the Pacific when we sailed through the remnants of a typhoon. No great problem ... heavy seas and a long slow rolling motion which was regularly hitting 35 degrees of roll ... each way.  Slightly different to a short whipping motion with a small angle of roll.

 

I suffer from ‘motion sickness’ in that I hate roller coasters etc but that ‘motion sickness’ never gave me any problems at sea.

 

 

 

 

Probably on one of the "Wild" reefers.

 

We hit similar conditions in the Indian Ocean on Wild Auk - nice easy rolling to about 40 to 45 degrees for a couple of days. No hot meals aboard and sleeping on the deck, with the mattress propped up with lifejackets.

 

Just like a baby's cradle.😁 

 

Hit a Pacific Storm on my only tanker - one of the PanOcean Chemical Tankers. Old Man hove-too to prevent damage to the deck tanks/piping, so we lost 30 miles over a couple of days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, the days of single hull tankers, with a laden freeboard of about 3 feet, and a GM of 6".  Rolls over and thinks about whether it wants to roll back, and the entire deck forward of the house under green water during storms.  Double hulls much higher, but also much stiffer, not comfortable rolling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That sums it up quite nicely 😀

 

The teeny freeboard was very handy though. On the Indian crewed ships the lookout used to have a dawn visit to the maindeck to collect the still flapping flying fish which in turn were served up to the OOW ... within 30 minutes ... nice ‘n spicy and wrapped in a warm, fresh from the galley, chapatti 😋😋😋

 
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have sailed the Med off and on for 50 years - US Navy and commercial cruise ships.  The Med can be very rough.  One port stop in Naples had to helo the crew back onboard do to high winds and rough seas over 24 hours.  Have also experience extremely calm seas - like glass - in the Med and Atlantic.  The Pacific tends to create long swells that can cause rolling.  One cruise ship captain expressed that his worst experience was in the Bay of Biscay off the west coast of France.  Crossed the Drake twice - like a lake.  So, it all depends...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/16/2021 at 10:20 PM, zerooveride said:

Scopolamine patches work great! Just ask your doctor for a prescription. Put it on a day or two before the cruise and wear a day or two after. Won't even realize you're wearing one.

1073028.jpg

Yep,  until the side effects hit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, crazyank said:

Yep,  until the side effects hit.

ROFL.  Here is a true story I have not posted for years.  On a HAL cruise (a few years ago) an elderly lady was found wandering the corridors, late at night, completely naked!  When discovered by a crew member she was treated as a medical emergency and taken to the ship's medical center and the poor physician was woken to see this lady (we learned this story from that physician).  His first assumption was that the lady had some dementia complicated by sleepwalking,  But once the husband spoke to the physician it quickly became apparent that she was simply suffering from Transderm Scop side effects (of which hallucinations are documented).  

 

Many years ago DW and I both tried the patches on a few cruises.  In my case the only side effect was "dry mouth" which is not a bad thing when on a ship with lots of drink opportunities.  But DW found that she was unable to focus/read after a couple of days on the patch.  We never used the things again.

 

Hank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To get back to the original question of whether or not the seas will be rough.... no one knows.  The post did become a bit of "I can top that", didn't it?

In our several hundred days of cruising, in many parts of the world, I'd say we've only had a dozen rough ones.  So statistically, we consider the chances fairly low.

I do have great sympathy for anyone who suffers seasickness.  When we started cruising, the issue was never mentioned, so we never considered taking any medication.  Now, with so much conversation on the subject, it must be tempting to medicate "just in case".  But then you'll never know if you would have been fine without it, and without the side effects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 5/18/2021 at 2:29 PM, Ride-The-Waves said:

Have sailed the Med off and on for 50 years - US Navy and commercial cruise ships.  The Med can be very rough.  One port stop in Naples had to helo the crew back onboard do to high winds and rough seas over 24 hours.  Have also experience extremely calm seas - like glass - in the Med and Atlantic.  The Pacific tends to create long swells that can cause rolling.  One cruise ship captain expressed that his worst experience was in the Bay of Biscay off the west coast of France.  Crossed the Drake twice - like a lake.  So, it all depends...

Some of the roughest seas in the Med are in the Gulf of Lyon when the Mistral , roaring down the Rhone valley with well-over hurricane force winds, churns up the shallow waters just south of Marseille and Toulon.

Edited by navybankerteacher
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, navybankerteacher said:

Some of the roughest seas in the Med are in the Gulf of Lyon when the Mistral , roaring down the Rhone valley with well-over hurricane force winds, churns up the shallow waters just south of Marseille and Toulon.

Also the "bora" or a katabatic wind that sweeps down from the mountains along the Adriatic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, crazyank said:

Yep,  until the side effects hit.

Me and my wife and a few other people I know have had no issues. But medications effect everyone differently. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/16/2021 at 1:20 PM, zerooveride said:

Scopolamine patches work great! Just ask your doctor for a prescription. Put it on a day or two before the cruise and wear a day or two after. Won't even realize you're wearing one.

1073028.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sea bands are great too. They work by acupressure and sit just over your wrist. You can usually also get access to gravel ( diphenhydramine) on board most ships.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/16/2021 at 1:20 PM, zerooveride said:

Scopolamine patches work great! Just ask your doctor for a prescription. Put it on a day or two before the cruise and wear a day or two after. Won't even realize you're wearing one.

1073028.jpg

Do not do what some people say and cut the patches in half for a half dose. These patches don’t work that way, and you may wind up with a heavier dose. This has been a public service announcement.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2021 at 11:28 PM, K32682 said:

If you get sick on one cruise you can get sick on any of them. There's no point in asking if one sea is calmer than another because there's no guarantee anywhere you go.  Even large inland lakes such as Lake Superior can put up some pretty rough seas.
 

I'm not predisposed to motion sickness but it puzzles me that those who are still insist on cruising. They dope themselves with prescription drugs that can have side effects, wear goofy glasses and magic amulets or pop Gravol and ginger pills. Any vacation I have to dope myself up for isn't a vacation worth taking. 

Actually everyone gets seasick at some point - just some of us have less tolerance than others. Even the Russian sailors on the ice-strengthened ship we took in Jan get sea sick if its rough enough. 

 

  I've tried every drug in the book - and patches work for me. It meant I got to the southern NZ islands and get close up to wild penguins at the Snares. That was totally worth wearing a patch for a few days.  I've also been very ill going to White Island (live volcano in NZ). And I've been ill on Greek ferries (no other way to get to the island). 

 

Some of us take drugs to do what others can do without thinking about it 

 

But its rough enough - you will get sick. I remember some smart arse American dr on a ferry in Southern Chile telling me  it was all in my mind. Was very happy to see him looking very green later on... 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Heidi13 said:

Sea bands are great too. They work by acupressure and sit just over your wrist. You can usually also get access to gravel ( diphenhydramine) on board most ships.

Tried those as well - did absolutely nothing for me. Neither does ginger, apples, and looking at the horizon. You really have to thoroughly experiment on yourself. The trouble is - don't wait until you are sick  - then its too late 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, lissie said:

Actually everyone gets seasick at some point - just some of us have less tolerance than others. Even the Russian sailors on the ice-strengthened ship we took in Jan get sea sick if its rough enough. 

 

I've tried every drug in the book - and patches work for me. It meant I got to the southern NZ islands and get close up to wild penguins at the Snares. That was totally worth wearing a patch for a few days.  I've also been very ill going to White Island (live volcano in NZ). And I've been ill on Greek ferries (no other way to get to the island). 

 

Some of us take drugs to do what others can do without thinking about it 

 

But its rough enough - you will get sick. I remember some smart arse American dr on a ferry in Southern Chile telling me  it was all in my mind. Was very happy to see him looking very green later on... 

 

 

So far it hasn't happened and I've been in boats and on planes where most people were losing their cookies while I made it through just fine. 


I was once happy to see other people green.  On a fishing charter in Mexico the wind blew up unexpectedly and my wife who is motion sensitive became ill.  The other couple we'd split the charter with thought it was hysterical until they went green and leaned over the side a few minutes later. 

 

Edited by K32682
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, lissie said:

Actually everyone gets seasick at some point - just some of us have less tolerance than others. Even the Russian sailors on the ice-strengthened ship we took in Jan get sea sick if its rough enough. 

 

  I've tried every drug in the book - and patches work for me. It meant I got to the southern NZ islands and get close up to wild penguins at the Snares. That was totally worth wearing a patch for a few days.  I've also been very ill going to White Island (live volcano in NZ). And I've been ill on Greek ferries (no other way to get to the island). 

 

Some of us take drugs to do what others can do without thinking about it 

 

But its rough enough - you will get sick. I remember some smart arse American dr on a ferry in Southern Chile telling me  it was all in my mind. Was very happy to see him looking very green later on... 

 

 

 

Disagree.   I spent 21 years in the Navy going through storms that would make many never want to set foot on a ship ever again.  Never once got sick, neither did a whole bunch of others I sailed with.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Everyone gets seasick at some point..."  NOT!

IMO, that's equivalent to saying Everyone will ascend Everest at some point, or Everyone will call kale their favorite food at some point.

Not true in the least.

I'm grateful that DH and I started sailing before there was any discussion of medications.  Had we been as frightened as some here seem to be, we might have medicated, and never known that we just aren't susceptible.  Nor are the majority of people we've sailed with since the 1960's, including in some exceedingly rough seas.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, lissie said:

Actually everyone gets seasick at some point - just some of us have less tolerance than others. Even the Russian sailors on the ice-strengthened ship we took in Jan get sea sick if its rough enough. 

 

  I've tried every drug in the book - and patches work for me. It meant I got to the southern NZ islands and get close up to wild penguins at the Snares. That was totally worth wearing a patch for a few days.  I've also been very ill going to White Island (live volcano in NZ). And I've been ill on Greek ferries (no other way to get to the island). 

 

Some of us take drugs to do what others can do without thinking about it 

 

But its rough enough - you will get sick. I remember some smart arse American dr on a ferry in Southern Chile telling me  it was all in my mind. Was very happy to see him looking very green later on... 

 

I do not think this is the case - after many cruises and several  years in the Navy in rough conditions on large and small ships, I have yet to get sick.  The closest was spending over an hour in a pitching LCVP (small landing craft) having to breathe a combination of diesel fumes and the scent of vomit which did not make it over the side. I did not like it - had a headache, felt miserable but held down my breakfast - and as soon as we offloaded and backed off the beach the cleaner air left me feeling fine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, lissie said:

Actually everyone gets seasick at some point - just some of us have less tolerance than others. Even the Russian sailors on the ice-strengthened ship we took in Jan get sea sick if its rough enough. 

 

 But its rough enough - you will get sick.

 

 

With almost 40 years at sea, I am another of the fortunate ones that doesn't get sick, regardless of the motion.

 

The worst motion I experienced is actually when inside a 25-person liferaft in a swimming pool, with kids at the other end. Nothing I experienced in storms was as uncomfortable as the liferaft experience.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, Heidi13 said:

 

With almost 40 years at sea, I am another of the fortunate ones that doesn't get sick, regardless of the motion.

 

The worst motion I experienced is actually when inside a 25-person liferaft in a swimming pool, with kids at the other end. Nothing I experienced in storms was as uncomfortable as the liferaft experience.

My life raft experience was 10 miles offshore Halifax, in March, for survival training, with it running 6 foot seas.  That one got me real quick.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • Holland America Line’s Alaska Exploration Sale
      • Cruise Critic Live Special Event: Q&A with American Queen Voyages
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...