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Dawn Cruise 11/14/2021


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Posted (edited)

We are booked on this cruise as well. Did reach out to my PCC today and for the first time ever I did not hear back from him the day he got a message from me. And I was so optimistic this week after the EU opened to tourism. Now it is just wait an see. Could be our fourth cancelled cruise. 

Edited by horseboarder
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I am so sorry to everyone sailing on these newly cancelled sailings. It is somehow getting more and more painful to have sailings cancelled when we finally seem to be coming out the other side of the pandemic.

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16 minutes ago, JamieLogical said:

I am so sorry to everyone sailing on these newly cancelled sailings. It is somehow getting more and more painful to have sailings cancelled when we finally seem to be coming out the other side of the pandemic.

I agree, painful but not unexpected. At the risk of sounding negative (I prefer the term realistic), there are huge obstacles to overcome. Covid status of destinations; vaccination ability for crew, willingness of Johnny Public to produce revenue generated sailings, etc...will likely lead to more cancellations. Example; the Star is set to sail Antarctica in January of 2022. I highly doubt those sailings are happening given the state of South America.  The POA has a few interesting challenges in terms of various island policy and local resistance to resumption. I just don't see how any cruise line is going to be able to fill all of their ships within the next year (or two). Covid has changed the industry. What emerges is going to be interesting. I suspect those of us who love cruising will love the new normal.

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6 hours ago, BermudaBound2014 said:

I agree, painful but not unexpected. At the risk of sounding negative (I prefer the term realistic), there are huge obstacles to overcome. Covid status of destinations; vaccination ability for crew, willingness of Johnny Public to produce revenue generated sailings, etc...will likely lead to more cancellations. Example; the Star is set to sail Antarctica in January of 2022. I highly doubt those sailings are happening given the state of South America.  The POA has a few interesting challenges in terms of various island policy and local resistance to resumption. I just don't see how any cruise line is going to be able to fill all of their ships within the next year (or two). Covid has changed the industry. What emerges is going to be interesting. I suspect those of us who love cruising will love the new normal.

NCL looks prescient in going down in size for Project Leonardo.

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Posted (edited)

Realizing, I am not the only one concerned about the recent NCL cancellations, because these cancellations do  affect the cruises that are scheduled to sail after them. For example, I am booked on the NCL Dawn 02/27/22. This cruise depends on the NCL Dawn crossing the Transatlantic from Rome on 11/27/21 to Tampa, FL arriving on 12/08/21. If this ship doesn't sail as planned across the Atlantic the rest of us who has had bookings on the NCL Dawn, is without a ship. Unless, there is a backup plan of action for another ship that NCL has in mind. Moreover, I did wondered why they would sail such a small ship like the NCL Dawn late in November where the roughest seas occur due to no land masses. Only to turn the Dawn around and sail her right back across the Atlantic in April. I suppose their logistics are a bit off after not sailing regularly.  In my opinion, doing the Atlantic crossing late in October, would make better sense.  

 

~SilentlyPerfect (Katia) 

Edited by SilentlyPerfect
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57 minutes ago, SilentlyPerfect said:

Realizing, I am not the only one concerned about the recent NCL cancellations, because these cancellations do  affect the cruises that are scheduled to sail after them. For example, I am booked on the NCL Dawn 02/27/22. This cruise depends on the NCL Dawn crossing the Transatlantic from Rome on 11/27/21 to Tampa, FL arriving on 12/08/21. If this ship doesn't sail as planned across the Atlantic the rest of us who has had bookings on the NCL Dawn, is without a ship. Unless, there is a backup plan of action for another ship that NCL has in mind. Moreover, I did wondered why they would sail such a small ship like the NCL Dawn late in November where the roughest seas occur due to no land masses. Only to turn the Dawn around and sail her right back across the Atlantic in April. I suppose their logistics are a bit off after not sailing regularly.  In my opinion, doing the Atlantic crossing late in October, would make better sense.  

 

~SilentlyPerfect (Katia) 

First, the Dawn definitely will not be crossing on 11/21 (when it was scheduled, not 11/27) unless it is without pax.  That sailing is cancelled.  It thus will be able to cross any time between now and when the first cruise is scheduled out of Tampa in December.

Many ships cross in November and early December every year.  And most return to Europe in April or May, every year.  This is not in any way unusual.

 

The Dawn is not, by any means, a "small ship."  Having crossed over 30 times in all sizes of ships, the difference between an R Class ship (30,000 tons) and and 'Away class ship (145,000 tons) is not as significant as you may think,  Dawn (92,000 tons) sits right in the middle.

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17 hours ago, ECCruise said:

First, the Dawn definitely will not be crossing on 11/21 (when it was scheduled, not 11/27) unless it is without pax.  That sailing is cancelled.  It thus will be able to cross any time between now and when the first cruise is scheduled out of Tampa in December.

Many ships cross in November and early December every year.  And most return to Europe in April or May, every year.  This is not in any way unusual.

 

The Dawn is not, by any means, a "small ship."  Having crossed over 30 times in all sizes of ships, the difference between an R Class ship (30,000 tons) and and 'Away class ship (145,000 tons) is not as significant as you may think,  Dawn (92,000 tons) sits right in the middle.

Hey thank you for that update. 😉 Not surprisingly, I must had gotten the date of the transatlantic cruise messed up with the actual date of my cruise 02/27/22... the day that is, not anything else. Obviously, I have never sailed across the Atlantic, but it is on my list of cruises to do. I have always heard of the NCL Dawn being on the small size, since living near the Tampa Bay port, only the smaller size cruise ships can sail into the port. I suppose that is one of those things I should had research first, after looking into when rough sea do occur. I am not the sort of person who get sea sick and I have no idea why. In fact, I have a better chance of getting land sickness (approximately up to two-weeks) after coming back from a cruise. Therefore, I have no fears of rough waters no matter where I sail. Hopefully, NCL will sail the Dawn across the Atlantic sooner than later and quite my nerves. For some reason, I feel like NCL would be losing millions of dollars in revenue from December 2021, to April 2022, unless deciding to switch the Dawn out for another one of their ships. Since only the smaller ships in their fleet can actually sail into Tampa port, it makes me wonder which ship would that be?  I suppose it all comes down to a waiting game, no matter what ship you plan on cruising during 2021 and early 2022. 

 

~SilentlyPerfect (Katia) 

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1 minute ago, SilentlyPerfect said:

 Hopefully, NCL will sail the Dawn across the Atlantic sooner than later and quite my nerves. For some reason, I feel like NCL would be losing millions of dollars in revenue from December 2021, to April 2022, unless deciding to switch the Dawn out for another one of their ships. Since only the smaller ships in their fleet can actually sail into Tampa port, it makes me wonder which ship would that be?  I suppose it all comes down to a waiting game, no matter what ship you plan on cruising during 2021 and early 2022. 

 

~SilentlyPerfect (Katia) 

My totally unofficial guess is that they will bring Dawn over some time in the next few months with minimal crew (senior officers, navigation, maintenance, minimal galley, etc.).  It just came out of dry dock last week in Marseilles. 

By getting the ship here it will be much easier to source crew and get them vaccinated before the first sailing in December.  That crew would be onboard through the entire Caribbean season as well as the crossing, currently scheduled on April 28, 2022 from NYC and the beginning of the European season.

 

But, again, that is a totally unverified guess! 😉

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I think it's wise to have a back up plan for the Dawn. According to Carnival (who is both the largest cruise company and the best postured financially), they have scaled back operations to plan for approximately only 50% of their ships sailing by the end of 2021. And those are plans, some of them might not sail. I suspect NCL will sail with a similar percentage of their fleet (maybe even less given CCL's strength overseas).

 

From Carnivals Q221 earnings report..... "27 ships, or approximately 35% of capacity, have resumed or are announced to resume by the end of the third quarter of 2021 and an additional 15 ships, or nearly 20% of capacity, are announced to resume by the end of the fourth quarter of 2021. Together these 42 ships represent over 50% of capacity.

Carnival Reports Q2 2021 Earnings, Provides Business Update - Cruise Industry News | Cruise News

 

While today is a day to celebrate (Edge first to sail out of the USA with Capt Kate at the helm), the overall picture of returning to cruising remains bleak. Back up your back up plans. 

 

PS: I know this sounds negative, but I would rather see you prepared for the worst and have a pleasant outcome than the opposite.

 

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1 minute ago, BermudaBound2014 said:

 

 

PS: I know this sounds negative, but I would rather see you prepared for the worst and have a pleasant outcome than the opposite.

 

Unfortunately you are right, it is always smart to have a back up plan in this scenario.  Although we have 14 sailings booked before mid-2023, every one in 2021 and early 2022 has back up.  Either a different cruise or a land tour.  Sadly, we have already exercised those options a number of times, right up until this week when the Dawn was deep-sixed for the crossing.

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