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Calypso54
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This will be our first cruise on Oceania.  We are curious about whether Jose Cuervo Margarita in a plastic bottle is allowed to be brought on board.  Margaritas are our favorite drink and on other ships we have been less than impressed. The premixed Jose isn't great, but it is better than what we've gotten previously and would be really good on the balcony.

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2 hours ago, Calypso54 said:

This will be our first cruise on Oceania.  We are curious about whether Jose Cuervo Margarita in a plastic bottle is allowed to be brought on board.  Margaritas are our favorite drink and on other ships we have been less than impressed. The premixed Jose isn't great, but it is better than what we've gotten previously and would be really good on the balcony.

Now that your question has been answered by LHT28, let’s turn our attention to the Margarita.


O has several decent Tequilas onboard (e.g., Patron Silver) but also gets serious with the likes of El Tesoro Anejo. And, once you’ve established a good rapport with a couple of bartenders, you can usually get fresh squeezed lime juice instead of the citrus mixer. You can also specify Cointreau instead of Triple Sec if you need the orange element.

 

Of course, while some folks would be happy with a “Margarita” made with Patron Silver, fresh lime juice and Cointreau, might I suggest that you try the “real thing?”

 

Margarita

2 oz. El Tesoro Reposado (Anejo is too smooth).

1 oz. fresh squeezed lime juice

1/3  to 1/2 oz. Agave Nectar depending on desired sweetness. (Thin with a touch of hot water for better mixing)

(Please- NO orange liqueur of any kind)

Shake with ice.


THAT is an authentic Margarita. Try it at home and it is very possible that you will henceforth save your Cointreau for Side Cars.

 

Side Car

2 oz. Hennessy Privilege Cognac [VSOP]

1 oz. fresh squeezed lemon juice 

1 oz. Cointreau

 Shake with ice

(I’m a rebel - so my Side Car garnish is a Bada Bing cherry).

 

 

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13 hours ago, Flatbush Flyer said:

Now that your question has been answered by LHT28, let’s turn our attention to the Margarita.


O has several decent Tequilas onboard (e.g., Patron Silver) but also gets serious with the likes of El Tesoro Anejo. And, once you’ve established a good rapport with a couple of bartenders, you can usually get fresh squeezed lime juice instead of the citrus mixer. You can also specify Cointreau instead of Triple Sec if you need the orange element.

 

Of course, while some folks would be happy with a “Margarita” made with Patron Silver, fresh lime juice and Cointreau, might I suggest that you try the “real thing?”

 

Margarita

2 oz. El Tesoro Reposado (Anejo is too smooth).

1 oz. fresh squeezed lime juice

1/3  to 1/2 oz. Agave Nectar depending on desired sweetness. (Thin with a touch of hot water for better mixing)

(Please- NO orange liqueur of any kind)

Shake with ice.


THAT is an authentic Margarita. Try it at home and it is very possible that you will henceforth save your Cointreau for Side Cars.

 

Side Car

2 oz. Hennessy Privilege Cognac [VSOP]

1 oz. fresh squeezed lemon juice 

1 oz. Cointreau

 Shake with ice

(I’m a rebel - so my Side Car garnish is a Bada Bing cherry).

 

 

I like the way you think.  One of each please!

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1 hour ago, KatieBelle said:

I like the way you think.  One of each please!

I looked at the O wine list before asking, did not see it but figured I’d ask anyway, maybe they have a “secret “ wine list.  Anyone ever able to to find a Brunello on board any ship?

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I guess I worded the question wrong. What I want to know is if we can bring a 1.75L plastic bottle of premixed spirits onboard. We have cruised with HAL the last few years and they allow no plastic bottles. As of their latest change , they now only allow 12 canned sodas and canned water.

 

Now, as for a Margarita. I agree with Reposado, but V&H and I prefer a frozen not shaken Margarita with Grand Marnier🍹.

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18 minutes ago, Calypso54 said:

I guess I worded the question wrong. What I want to know is if we can bring a 1.75L plastic bottle of premixed spirits onboard.

Yes, but but, as Lynn stated,  you can't drink it in any venue, other than your stateroom, or on your veranda.

Edited by 1985rz1
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37 minutes ago, Calypso54 said:

I guess I worded the question wrong. What I want to know is if we can bring a 1.75L plastic bottle of premixed spirits onboard. We have cruised with HAL the last few years and they allow no plastic bottles. As of their latest change , they now only allow 12 canned sodas and canned water.

 

Now, as for a Margarita. I agree with Reposado, but V&H and I prefer a frozen not shaken Margarita with Grand Marnier🍹.

As aforementioned, you can bring whatever spirits you want as long as you drink them in your cabin.

I still think you should try the historically accurate Margarita I suggested.

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2 hours ago, LGW59 said:

I looked at the O wine list before asking, did not see it but figured I’d ask anyway, maybe they have a “secret “ wine list.  Anyone ever able to to find a Brunello on board any ship?

They do -- I have ordered it in Toscana on an R ship.   You may not like the price :).  You could always bring a bottle (or several ) of your favorite -- with the $25 corkage, you will come out ahead. 

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1 hour ago, Calypso54 said:

I guess I worded the question wrong. What I want to know is if we can bring a 1.75L plastic bottle of premixed spirits onboard. We have cruised with HAL the last few years and they allow no plastic bottles. As of their latest change , they now only allow 12 canned sodas and canned water.

 

 

same answer as before 😉

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11 minutes ago, BarbaraM said:

They do -- I have ordered it in Toscana on an R ship.   You may not like the price :).  You could always bring a bottle (or several ) of your favorite -- with the $25 corkage, you will come out ahead. 

Excellent to hear.  I will be on Regatta if they did not stock I’d def bring 2 bottles on with me. But since they do I’ll just buy on board, I’ll be the only one drinking it and I think I read that they will cork it and store for the following nights dinner.  Appreciate your response and information!

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Two things, don’t bother with bringing soda’s aboard, just ask your TA to request the brand you drink. We are Pepsi drinkers so Pepsi appears in our refrigerator throughout the cruise. Second, I don’t know where you are traveling from or where you are buying the 1.75 Ltr bottles but if you are carrying them with you on your flight, they would have to travel in your checked suitcases and eat up your 50# weight limit . If you can buy the bottles before boarding or perhaps in one of the ports of call, you are good to go.  Not an issue on O and we love them for that policy. 
Gerry 

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4 hours ago, LGW59 said:

I looked at the O wine list before asking, did not see it but figured I’d ask anyway, maybe they have a “secret “ wine list.  Anyone ever able to to find a Brunello on board any ship?

There can be multiple wine lists depending on your restaurant choice. And, for bargains (if you know wine), there’s the “bin end” list.

But, with no limit on supplying your own wine except for the $25 corkage/per bottle (if you take your wine to meals or other public venues beyond your cabin), it’s far smarter to bring your own. 
FWIW: skip the brunello and get some NorCal/Oregon pinot noir.

 

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1 minute ago, Flatbush Flyer said:

There can be multiple wine lists depending on your restaurant choice. And, for bargains (if you know wine), there’s the “bin end” list.

But, with no limit on supplying your own wine except for the $25 corkage/per bottle (if you take your wine to meals or other public venues beyond your cabin), it’s far smarter to bring your own. 
FWIW: skip the brunello and get some NorCal/Oregon pinot noir.

 

Thanks!  I will never skip the Brunello but will def try the Nor/Cal Oregon Pinot noir!

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On 6/25/2021 at 8:41 PM, LGW59 said:

Thanks!  I will never skip the Brunello but will def try the Nor/Cal Oregon Pinot noir!

We have had both from the wine list onboard and enjoyed both immensely! 🍷

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On 6/25/2021 at 1:30 AM, Flatbush Flyer said:

Now that your question has been answered by LHT28, let’s turn our attention to the Margarita.


O has several decent Tequilas onboard (e.g., Patron Silver) but also gets serious with the likes of El Tesoro Anejo. And, once you’ve established a good rapport with a couple of bartenders, you can usually get fresh squeezed lime juice instead of the citrus mixer. You can also specify Cointreau instead of Triple Sec if you need the orange element.

 

Of course, while some folks would be happy with a “Margarita” made with Patron Silver, fresh lime juice and Cointreau, might I suggest that you try the “real thing?”

 

Margarita

2 oz. El Tesoro Reposado (Anejo is too smooth).

1 oz. fresh squeezed lime juice

1/3  to 1/2 oz. Agave Nectar depending on desired sweetness. (Thin with a touch of hot water for better mixing)

(Please- NO orange liqueur of any kind)

Shake with ice.


THAT is an authentic Margarita. Try it at home and it is very possible that you will henceforth save your Cointreau for Side Cars.

 

 

We do strongly disagree....in terms of authentic Margaritas.  After living in Mexico for the past 15 winters (and being known by friends/amigos for my "killer margaritas") a margarita without an orange liqueur is just not a margarita.  Perhaps the most genuine of margarita formulas is found on the back of "Controy" (a very popular Mexican orange liqueur) which uses a simple combination of Tequilia (while most formulas use silver tequilia I favor reposados for more flavor) Controy (other orange liqueurs can be substituted but requires a change of formula) and fresh lime juice.  While some folks like to add a little agave nector, using Controy provides just enough sweetness for most folks.  As to the actual formula it varies depending on one's own taste.  I like them strong so will often use 2 parts reposado tequila to about 1 1/4 part Controy and about 3/4 - 1 part of fresh lime juice.  The formula must always be tweaked to account for the big difference of tartness of the lime.

 

As to the formula without orange liqueur I would simply call it a "poor person's drink."  Since most places outside Mexico cannot get real "Controy" many good bars substitute Cointreau (similar to Controy but with a more concentrated flavor) which is a pricy orange liqueur.  Failure to use the Orange Liqueur reduces to the cost of each drink and many bar tenders will try to cover it up with the addition of some kind of sweetener (such as agave nector or simple syrup) or a cheap commercial mix. 

 

Hank

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43 minutes ago, Hlitner said:

We do strongly disagree....in terms of authentic Margaritas.  After living in Mexico for the past 15 winters (and being known by friends/amigos for my "killer margaritas") a margarita without an orange liqueur is just not a margarita.  Perhaps the most genuine of margarita formulas is found on the back of "Controy" (a very popular Mexican orange liqueur) which uses a simple combination of Tequilia (while most formulas use silver tequilia I favor reposados for more flavor) Controy (other orange liqueurs can be substituted but requires a change of formula) and fresh lime juice.  While some folks like to add a little agave nector, using Controy provides just enough sweetness for most folks.  As to the actual formula it varies depending on one's own taste.  I like them strong so will often use 2 parts reposado tequila to about 1 1/4 part Controy and about 3/4 - 1 part of fresh lime juice.  The formula must always be tweaked to account for the big difference of tartness of the lime.

 

As to the formula without orange liqueur I would simply call it a "poor person's drink."  Since most places outside Mexico cannot get real "Controy" many good bars substitute Cointreau (similar to Controy but with a more concentrated flavor) which is a pricy orange liqueur.  Failure to use the Orange Liqueur reduces to the cost of each drink and many bar tenders will try to cover it up with the addition of some kind of sweetener (such as agave nector or simple syrup) or a cheap commercial mix. 

 

 

There are, as one would expect about all sorts of cocktails, varying accounts of the origins of the Margarita. As you mention in your post above, perhaps it was a “poor man’s” drink without the Cointreau or perhaps it was Danny Herrera’s take on the Daisy cocktail. We will never know.

 

 https://www.winemag.com/recipe/the-history-of-the-margarita-and-how-to-make-it-right/


https://vinepair.com/wine-blog/the-mystery-behind-who-really-created-the-margarita/

 

That said (and IMO), the making of the “modern” classic Margarita is undisputed among a growing number of bartenders throughout North America. And that “modern” classic follows the recipe of Tommy’s Joint in San Francisco, which is the basis of what I originally posted (though I substitute Reposado for Blanco Tequila).


BTW, it’s interesting to note that the 1937 Cafe Royal Cocktail Book contains a recipe for a “Picador” using the same concentrations of tequila, triple sec and lime juice as a margarita.

 

I’m not a big Wikipedia fan. But I did find their piece about the Margarita interesting (including the item about Controy). 
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarita#Origin

 

In any case, I’m sticking with the perfect balance of Tommy’s three simple ingredients: Tequila, fresh lime juice and agave syrup.

 

You may want to try it in a side-by-side comparison with that Picador (oops! I mean “other” Margarita). 😉

 

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7 minutes ago, Flatbush Flyer said:

There are, as one would expect about all sorts of cocktails, varying accounts of the origins of the Margarita. As you mention in your post above, perhaps it was a “poor man’s” drink without the Cointreau or perhaps it was Danny Herrera’s take on the Daisy cocktail. We will never know.

 

 https://www.winemag.com/recipe/the-history-of-the-margarita-and-how-to-make-it-right/


https://vinepair.com/wine-blog/the-mystery-behind-who-really-created-the-margarita/

 

That said (and IMO), the making of the “modern” classic Margarita is undisputed among a growing number of bartenders throughout North America. And that “modern” classic follows the recipe of Tommy’s Joint in San Francisco, which is the basis of what I originally posted (though I substitute Reposado for Blanco Tequila).


BTW, it’s interesting to note that the 1937 Cafe Royal Cocktail Book contains a recipe for a “Picador” using the same concentrations of tequila, triple sec and lime juice as a margarita.

 

I’m not a big Wikipedia fan. But I did find their piece about the Margarita interesting (including the item about Controy). 
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarita#Origin

 

In any case, I’m sticking with the perfect balance of Tommy’s three simple ingredients: Tequila, fresh lime juice and agave syrup.

 

You may want to try it in a side-by-side comparison with that Picador (oops! I mean “other” Margarita). 😉

 

I will definitely do the side by side comparison as it will be fun and I likely will not care by the time I finish the exercise :).

 

I have previously played around with different formulas using Cointreau, Triple Sec, and Grand Marnier matched with different tequilas including both white (silver) and reposados (I will not insult Anjeos by mixing them with anything).  My goal was to find my favorite combination and try to approximate what I get in Mexico when using Controy (not available in most parts of the USA).  My "research" left no doubt that I prefer reposados over white (silver).  I also found that I can approximate the taste of a Controy based margarita by using a lesser amount of Cointreau.  Triple Sec just does not meet my standard in margaritas.  Grand Marnier is somewhat overpowering but does provide an interesting drink (we have been some places that call this a "Cadillac Margarita" as mentioned in your Wiki referenced article).

 

I will also mention that at the end of my annual SuperBowl Party (held in Mexico except for last year when COVID forced cancelation) most folks leave with a smile (it helps that we pour our margaritas in an 8 ounce cup which contains about 6 ounces of booze).  I should mention that there are lots of different formulas used in Puerto Vallarta bars including the somewhat famous $1 Margarita sold in the Sea Monkey (and also previously in the now defunct Cheeky Monkey) which has very cheap tequila mixed with a cheap mix.  Many of my friends (and some bars) also enhance their margarita with a splash of soda (often Squirt or 7-Up).    This is a fun topic :).

 

Hank

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1 minute ago, Hlitner said:

I will definitely do the side by side comparison as it will be fun and I likely will not care by the time I finish the exercise :).

 

I have previously played around with different formulas using Cointreau, Triple Sec, and Grand Marnier matched with different tequilas including both white (silver) and reposados (I will not insult Anjeos by mixing them with anything).  My goal was to find my favorite combination and try to approximate what I get in Mexico when using Controy (not available in most parts of the USA).  My "research" left no doubt that I prefer reposados over white (silver).  I also found that I can approximate the taste of a Controy based margarita by using a lesser amount of Cointreau.  Triple Sec just does not meet my standard in margaritas.  Grand Marnier is somewhat overpowering but does provide an interesting drink (we have been some places that call this a "Cadillac Margarita" as mentioned in your Wiki referenced article).

 

I will also mention that at the end of my annual SuperBowl Party (held in Mexico except for last year when COVID forced cancelation) most folks leave with a smile (it helps that we pour our margaritas in an 8 ounce cup which contains about 6 ounces of booze).  I should mention that there are lots of different formulas used in Puerto Vallarta bars including the somewhat famous $1 Margarita sold in the Sea Monkey (and also previously in the now defunct Cheeky Monkey) which has very cheap tequila mixed with a cheap mix.  Many of my friends (and some bars) also enhance their margarita with a splash of soda (often Squirt or 7-Up).    This is a fun topic :).

 

Hank

This is fun. 


In retirement, I have taken a real interest in mixology - particularly as it relates to the use of ingredients we’ve found in our travels (don’t get me started on Pisco!). And having a story that goes with the drink at hand always makes for great conversation. 


(One of my favorite “ice-breakers” with a newly acquainted bartenders onboard a ship is to ask if s/he knows why the paper sleeve of an Angostura Bitters bottle is mis-sized).


In any case, I agree with not using Anejo Tequila for a Margarita - but for a somewhat different reason: It’s just too smooth and lacks what I would call the necessary “bite” of Reposado.

 

With so many wonderful concoctions to enjoy, I am fortunate to know my limit - though passing out before I reach it can be problematic 👀 (just kidding).

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On 6/29/2021 at 5:42 AM, Hlitner said:

We do strongly disagree....in terms of authentic Margaritas.  After living in Mexico for the past 15 winters (and being known by friends/amigos for my "killer margaritas") a margarita without an orange liqueur is just not a margarita.  Perhaps the most genuine of margarita formulas is found on the back of "Controy" (a very popular Mexican orange liqueur) which uses a simple combination of Tequilia (while most formulas use silver tequilia I favor reposados for more flavor) Controy (other orange liqueurs can be substituted but requires a change of formula) and fresh lime juice.  While some folks like to add a little agave nector, using Controy provides just enough sweetness for most folks.  As to the actual formula it varies depending on one's own taste.  I like them strong so will often use 2 parts reposado tequila to about 1 1/4 part Controy and about 3/4 - 1 part of fresh lime juice.  The formula must always be tweaked to account for the big difference of tartness of the lime.

 

As to the formula without orange liqueur I would simply call it a "poor person's drink."  Since most places outside Mexico cannot get real "Controy" many good bars substitute Cointreau (similar to Controy but with a more concentrated flavor) which is a pricy orange liqueur.  Failure to use the Orange Liqueur reduces to the cost of each drink and many bar tenders will try to cover it up with the addition of some kind of sweetener (such as agave nector or simple syrup) or a cheap commercial mix. 

 

Hank

 

I agree wholeheartedly. After spending years in our vacation home in Mexico your recipe for  the correct margarita is almost spot on. Two parts reposado tequila, one part fresh lime juice, one part Controy. Shaken over ice and poured. Agave nectar or simple syrup in a Margarita?  Sacrilege! BTW this formula using a high quality Mezcal instead of the tequila is also a delight!

 

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19 hours ago, CruiseLibra said:

 

I agree wholeheartedly. After spending years in our vacation home in Mexico your recipe for  the correct margarita is almost spot on. Two parts reposado tequila, one part fresh lime juice, one part Controy. Shaken over ice and poured. Agave nectar or simple syrup in a Margarita?  Sacrilege! BTW this formula using a high quality Mezcal instead of the tequila is also a delight!

 

A margarita without triple sec or something fancier??????  In most places in Mexico that might not go over well, although most margaritas are drank by Americans.  Not using fresh lime juice is probably a capital offense in the Mexican Constitution (just kidding...maybe).

 

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