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Oasis Class and Seasickness


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A ship as big as oasis has so little movement, I hardly could tell it was moving compared to smaller ships.

 

Of course the least movement is lower and mid ship, like a teeter toter. The fulcrum moves the least.

 

How about a city park balcony toward the middle. Or boardwalk to see more action. Toward midship.

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For most, being inside is worse if you are seasick.  The problem is the disconnect between what your body is feeling (the motion) and what your brain is seeing (what appears to be nothing moving).

 

Getting yourself outside to actually see the horizon moving in the same manner that your body is feeling tells your brain "ok...now I get it".  

 

Balcony all the way...and as another poster said, Meclizine.  Works wonders.

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Just now, ccruise87 said:

Thank you! Will look for a balcony on deck 7 then maybe

The lower the deck, the less movement there will be, so you might want to consider deck 3 instead, with a window.

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Oasis class have very little movement, if any . Caribbean sea is pretty calm most of the time also.

So a Caribbean cruise on an Oasis class ship half way up in the middle would be my recommendation for a smoother trip.

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I've been on an Oasis class ship for 28 days total, and I've only ever felt movement on one cruise, for a total of about 3-4 hours, and even that was minimal.  

The ocean/waves don't really affect Oasis sized ships, but the wind does.  That was the issue the one time I felt Oasis move -- we had a strong wind hitting directly on the side of the ship, which made it sway side to side a little bit, kind of like a skyscraper does.  

Other than that, I have to look out a window / off the deck to even know if we're moving.

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3 hours ago, firefly333 said:

A ship as big as oasis has so little movement, I hardly could tell it was moving compared to smaller ships.

 

Of course the least movement is lower and mid ship, like a teeter toter. The fulcrum moves the least.

 

How about a city park balcony toward the middle. Or boardwalk to see more action. Toward midship.

 

Totally agree.   The large ladies are so large...I can hardly feel any movement at all even in rough seas.  Which is one of the biggest reasons we chose Allure for the TA...plus way more to do on board during that long stretch of sea days.  😉 

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3 hours ago, time4u2go said:

The lower the deck, the less movement there will be, so you might want to consider deck 3 instead, with a window.

I would favor the balcony over the window for seasickness. You can open the balcony and view the horizon, the spots on the window moving can make some feel worse.

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2 minutes ago, RedIguana said:

I would favor the balcony over the window for seasickness. You can open the balcony and view the horizon, the spots on the window moving can make some feel worse.

 

Plus the fresh air helps.  🙂 

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I suffer from severe motion sickness (I get sick on the tender rides to and from the ship!) and I've never gotten sick on the Oasis class ships. We always have a balcony, which I'm sure helps.

 

The only medicine that has ever helped me with motion sickness is Zofran, but it's not always easy to get from the doctor.

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8 minutes ago, Booking It said:

I suffer from severe motion sickness (I get sick on the tender rides to and from the ship!) and I've never gotten sick on the Oasis class ships. We always have a balcony, which I'm sure helps.

 

The only medicine that has ever helped me with motion sickness is Zofran, but it's not always easy to get from the doctor.


Thanks for sharing your personal experience from the standpoint of someone who does experience motion sickness.  

I can preach all day about how the "big girls" don't really move around, but I'm someone who actually ENJOYS the motion and misses it on the bigger ships. 

 

Hearing it from someone who actually experiences motion sickness is much more beneficial to someone who is concerned about it, I'm sure. 

 

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I agree with being mid ship and lower down... Deck 6-7 should be okay. Problem I have had with sea sickness medication is feeling tired. They suggest you take it before you board... and not once you are sick. I have had some luck with wrist bans... The larger ships don't move around that much... but higher decks can have some movement. I would think a porthole would be worse... seeing the horizon then the ocean ..repeated can be disturbing. I recall getting sea sick in a matter of seconds on a small sail boat when I went below to get a soda... that was all she wrote.  Over time I seem to have overcome sea sickness and like some motion, especially when going to sleep.

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Posted (edited)

 

4 hours ago, loman said:

Caribbean sea is pretty calm most of the time

 

"MOST" ...  extremely key word

 

A photo from Harmony... I also have a similar photo from Oasis.

P1121801.JPG

 

For those of you who claim that an Oasis Class ship never moves and people do not get sick on them, you simply have not been on a sailing on Oasis Class where the swells are more than a couple of feet high.

 

Yes, Oasis Class is a mere speck of sand in a massive bath tub (the ocean)... start swirling around the bath tub water and that speck of sand will start moving all over the place. 

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I havent personally experienced any rough seas in the Caribbean , but i did on the Atlantic with the Anthem to Bermuda. I wont being doing that route any more . 

Ill stick with the Oasis class on the Caribbean. I didnt care for the Anthem either .

I found what works for me .

Happy sailing everyone !🙂

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17 minutes ago, loman said:

I wont being doing that route any more . 

Ill stick with the Oasis class on the Caribbean.

 

Both my sailings of rough(er) weather and fellow cruisers stumbling right & left as they walked were in the Caribbean. My specific photo above was Harmony sailing out of San Juan heading (heading to Labadee I believe). My Oasis sailing was the Western Coz/Falmouth route... can't remember now which evening the barf bags were out.

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I get very sea sick and car sick. I was always worried and for awhile used the behind the ear patches. But now after 20 cruises I have never had a problem on the large RCCL ships and have been on a couple of pretty rocky boats. The ships also have meds for people who have an issue and if you have never cruised I would suggest you take some patches or other meds with you. I still can't do smaller boats, whale watches, tours etc. and even in ports where we take tenders in I am holding my breath until we get to the dock, but on the day to day ship it is never an issue for me. 

 

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3 hours ago, loman said:

I havent personally experienced any rough seas in the Caribbean , but i did on the Atlantic with the Anthem to Bermuda. I wont being doing that route any more . 

Ill stick with the Oasis class on the Caribbean. I didnt care for the Anthem either .

I found what works for me .

Happy sailing everyone !🙂

 

My first trip was on the Oasis and we were evading Hurricane Sandy.  Lots of wave action.  We followed the storm into FLL, then flew north and got a repeat back home.

 

For Bermuda, we came back through some pretty rough seas.  They closed most of the pools but left one open.  Like a wave pool with the water level changing by a couple of feet as we moved along.  I've been to Bermuda other times and never encountered particularly rough seas.  But a winter trip out of NYC was pretty unpleasant for the first day or two.

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Much good advice so far.  Both husband and I get motion sickness very easily yet are avid cruisers.  Have used all the usual pharmaceuticals and they do work well.  Book a mid-ship cabin on as low a deck as possible.  Location makes a very real difference.  You can also choose cruises on mega ships that are sailing in waters that are generally calmer such as the fjords, Mediterranean and Caribbean.  Inland seas are usually a safer bet than the open ocean.  Frankly, we've had more trouble avoiding car sickness on mountainous excursions than we've had on the actual ships. 

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It may very well be an individual thing but for me location can make a dramatic difference.  I can remember being in the theater (forward, up in the bow in almost all ships) once and another time up on the lido deck and starting to feel queasy.  In both those instances I felt much better immediately upon returning to my mid-ship cabin on a lower deck.  (I joked that I must return to steerage.)  However, to the OP, these were  brief isolated incidents in rough seas and on smaller ships, not something that should prevent you from cruising. I agree that location would not matter given calm seas and a mega ship.  I still book "mid and low" and avoid the bow for open ocean cruises though.

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