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Sorry if my post was vague but I'm completely new to this, I have no idea what OP refers to. We are sailing with P&O on IONA in September and Cunard QM2 in May . I know that Cunard charges you PP per day but I understand that you are still expected to tip.

Thank you

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21 minutes ago, CarolineJB said:

Sorry if my post was vague but I'm completely new to this, I have no idea what OP refers to. We are sailing with P&O on IONA in September and Cunard QM2 in May . I know that Cunard charges you PP per day but I understand that you are still expected to tip.

Thank you

Must interject here.  

On Cunard it is the guest who decides if, or not, to remove the Daily Free.  It is also the guest who decides if, or not, to show appreciation of individual members of staff who have delivered service excellence.

Please do whatever one personally feels is right and are comfortable with.

But don’t forget, at the end of your cruise, do complete your Questionnaire, adding comments, as this is very important to the people who have supported one.  Also, an individual “Star” card lodged at GS will be greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 Hi, and welcome to Cruise Critic.

 

Tipping on cruise ships is quite contentious, because there's a big difference in tipping norms between Brits & Americans, much the same as in restaurants, bars, hotels etc ashore. 

 

P&O caters for Brits, so it works mainly on UK norms rather than US norms.🙂

That's one reason why for newbie Brit cruisers, P&O is an excellent choice

- Brit tastes in food & drink, though plenty of continental & world foods on the menus.

- Brit tastes in entertainment - esp humour cos Brit humour includes under-statement & satire, whereas American humour (sorry, "humor" 😉) tends to be more like Benny Hill

- the vast majority of passengers are Brits. Not great for broadening your experience, but ideal for a first cruise.

- on-board prices in sterling (although I'm guessing you're aware that cruise ships are cashless &  purchases are charged to your on-board account, it means no mental arithmetic or currency charges or fluctuations) 

- and yes, tipping is included in your ticket price. There's no need to stress about it, and no need to tip extra if you don't want to - you won't be judged, no crew member is going to be miffed. I can't be sure of numbers, but it's my guess that somewhere over half the passengers will put their hands in their pockets for their cabin steward, fewer will do so for their waiters, most won't tip bar staff.

For waiters it depends whether you're on fixed (aka traditional) dining  - same table, same time, same table-mates, and same waiters each evening, or Freedom Dining - just turn up at the dining room at any time during the dinner session & you'll be sat at a table for two or on a table with whoever turns up at the same time. There are pros & cons for Traditional or Freedom, but on Freedom you're unlikely to have the same waiters on different evenings - most folk don't tip each evening, so don't tip on Freedom dining. (I guess the same applies to bar staff, perhaps something for staff if you stick with one bar throughout the cruise).

If you get poor service in a hotel or restaurant, you'll very probably not tip. Highly unlikely on a cruise ship, but the same applies. For good service - and especially for a crew-member who goes the extra mile - I guess for a 7-day cruise somewhere between £5 & £25 per cabin for the cabin steward, £5 to £15 between your table's waiters. But, to stress,  that's totally subjective - no worries if you tip zilch or super-generously.

 

Cunard may be a British name, with a long & illustrious British history, but despite flying the Red Ensign and having "Southampton" painted on her bum, she's now very American.

Depending on Covid travel regulations, a lot of your fellow-passengers may be American - esp if it's trans-Atlantic. 

I've not sailed Cunard, but the tipping routine is much the same as US ships - yes, a daily service charge is added to your on-board account. It's not cheap, something like $13 to $15 (?) per person per day. That aligns with the level of tips on US soil, where tips are the backbone of servers' incomes. 

But no, additional tips aren't assumed by the crew, and - again a guess - most Brits and a fair number of Americans don't tip extra. But although I have experience of a number of US cruise lines, I've not sailed Cunard - so best be led by others.

Beware - on-board currency is US dollars. You'll be billed in dollars so, unless you have a credit card which doesn't charge for currency exchange, there'll be an exchange fee from your bank for settling your on-board account.

During the cruise, probably in the last few days, you'll be asked if you'd like your on-board account to be charged to your bank in sterling "for your convenience". DECLINE that kind offer - the exchange rates used by cruise ships are gross, usually about 10% poorer than banks or exchange bureaux. (same applies to purchases abroad - always but always have your card charged in local currency to avoid being scammed.)

And same applies to ships' cash currency exchange - get your foreign shore spending money before you go from the usual suspects - M&S, Sainsbury, Tesco, on-line bureaux, etc. But mainly use your credit card for purchases. If you're likely to visit foreign shores a few times, for those trips get a card that doesn't charge foreign exchange fees - Halifax Clarity, Capital One, Oost Office, etc.

 

OP = Original poster.

More abbreviations at https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2500794-abbreviationsacronyms-look-up-here-before-asking/

 

Hope this helps more than it confuses 😄

 

JB 🙂

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Additional 

Regarding the Cunard Day Fee,  it is not a binary choice to keep or remove, as one has the option to increase or reduce to a figure comfortable to the Guest.

 

May one make a suggestion, when on Cunard and liking, so much so one may wish to consider a future cruise, but have a reservation about booking onboard, wishing to delay booking until there is one, at future date that meets requirements.   Then purchase a tranche of Future Cruise Deposits (FCD).  
Use per quest with a maximum of per two off pax per stateroom.

It is a no brainer, as the value of the FCD is a contribution towards the deposit and one receives Onboard Credit (OBC) - AKA Free Money

 

Amounts

Sailings of 6-9 days Stateroom Category 

Onboard Credit Amount 

Grill 

$200 per person 

Balcony 

$150 per person 

Inside & Outside 

$100 per person 

 

Sailings of 10 days or more Stateroom Category 

Onboard Credit Amount 

Grill 

$400 per person 

Balcony 

$300 per person 

Inside & Outside 

$200 per person

 

Enjoy…….😀

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, John Bull said:

 Hi, and welcome to Cruise Critic.

 

Tipping on cruise ships is quite contentious, because there's a big difference in tipping norms between Brits & Americans, much the same as in restaurants, bars, hotels etc ashore. 

 

P&O caters for Brits, so it works mainly on UK norms rather than US norms.🙂

That's one reason why for newbie Brit cruisers, P&O is an excellent choice

- Brit tastes in food & drink, though plenty of continental & world foods on the menus.

- Brit tastes in entertainment - esp humour cos Brit humour includes under-statement & satire, whereas American humour (sorry, "humor" 😉) tends to be more like Benny Hill

- the vast majority of passengers are Brits. Not great for broadening your experience, but ideal for a first cruise.

- on-board prices in sterling (although I'm guessing you're aware that cruise ships are cashless &  purchases are charged to your on-board account, it means no mental arithmetic or currency charges or fluctuations) 

- and yes, tipping is included in your ticket price. There's no need to stress about it, and no need to tip extra if you don't want to - you won't be judged, no crew member is going to be miffed. I can't be sure of numbers, but it's my guess that somewhere over half the passengers will put their hands in their pockets for their cabin steward, fewer will do so for their waiters, most won't tip bar staff.

For waiters it depends whether you're on fixed (aka traditional) dining  - same table, same time, same table-mates, and same waiters each evening, or Freedom Dining - just turn up at the dining room at any time during the dinner session & you'll be sat at a table for two or on a table with whoever turns up at the same time. There are pros & cons for Traditional or Freedom, but on Freedom you're unlikely to have the same waiters on different evenings - most folk don't tip each evening, so don't tip on Freedom dining. (I guess the same applies to bar staff, perhaps something for staff if you stick with one bar throughout the cruise).

If you get poor service in a hotel or restaurant, you'll very probably not tip. Highly unlikely on a cruise ship, but the same applies. For good service - and especially for a crew-member who goes the extra mile - I guess for a 7-day cruise somewhere between £5 & £25 per cabin for the cabin steward, £5 to £15 between your table's waiters. But, to stress,  that's totally subjective - no worries if you tip zilch or super-generously.

 

Cunard may be a British name, with a long & illustrious British history, but despite flying the Red Ensign and having "Southampton" painted on her bum, she's now very American.

Depending on Covid travel regulations, a lot of your fellow-passengers may be American - esp if it's trans-Atlantic. 

I've not sailed Cunard, but the tipping routine is much the same as US ships - yes, a daily service charge is added to your on-board account. It's not cheap, something like $13 to $15 (?) per person per day. That aligns with the level of tips on US soil, where tips are the backbone of servers' incomes. 

But no, additional tips aren't assumed by the crew, and - again a guess - most Brits and a fair number of Americans don't tip extra. But although I have experience of a number of US cruise lines, I've not sailed Cunard - so best be led by others.

Beware - on-board currency is US dollars. You'll be billed in dollars so, unless you have a credit card which doesn't charge for currency exchange, there'll be an exchange fee from your bank for settling your on-board account.

During the cruise, probably in the last few days, you'll be asked if you'd like your on-board account to be charged to your bank in sterling "for your convenience". DECLINE that kind offer - the exchange rates used by cruise ships are gross, usually about 10% poorer than banks or exchange bureaux. (same applies to purchases abroad - always but always have your card charged in local currency to avoid being scammed.)

And same applies to ships' cash currency exchange - get your foreign shore spending money before you go from the usual suspects - M&S, Sainsbury, Tesco, on-line bureaux, etc. But mainly use your credit card for purchases. If you're likely to visit foreign shores a few times, for those trips get a card that doesn't charge foreign exchange fees - Halifax Clarity, Capital One, Oost Office, etc.

 

OP = Original poster.

More abbreviations at https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2500794-abbreviationsacronyms-look-up-here-before-asking/

 

Hope this helps more than it confuses 😄

 

JB 🙂


That was a very fair description of a very contentious topic.  Well done.

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If the cruise line is  charging you tips daily...you've done all that's expected.   If you are charged for drinks, a tip will be added to the cost of that, as well.  There is no NEED to tip additionally, but some will.  It's entirely up to you.

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  • 5 weeks later...

I would not touch the P&O situation with a 50 foot mast as the Brits have an oft interesting perspective on gratuities.  But when it comes to Cunard (these days it is run as an American ship) there is no need (and should be no pressure) to tip more then their daily charge (pre paid or charged to your onboard account).  It is considered "bad form" to remove the automatic gratuities since it becomes part of a ship pool.  That being said, if you get service that you think is exceptional and deserving of more recognition it is appropriate to give that person cash (dollars or Euros) as an expression of your appreciation.  The amount is completely up to you and we know folks who have tipped hundreds of dollars extra (this is rare) and others who give folks much smaller amounts.  When I stumble on a great bar tender early in a cruise and he/she is at a bar I will frequent there will often be some cash changing hands.  Contrary to most tradition I like to tip favorite bar tenders (or bar waiters) early in a cruise (especially on a long cruise) as it magically seems to pay dividends with more attentive service.

 

Hank

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