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34 minutes ago, Cruise-y said:

Ok, this has nothing to do with the discussion at all, but I'll just throw it out to start another rabbit hole and get us off topic. I've had this exact box of computer-matrix-topped dark chocolates in the PH before, as I'm sure many of you have. I don't  remember the reason, but I know it was benign, not based on any controversy. I do truly love Crystal on so many culinary levels, but these bitter, stale candies were not at the top of my remembrance list. And I realize I'm probably in the minority here.  LOL!


I get those chocolates every cruise based on my number of cruises and most of the time I sail in steerage. Also, I don’t find them to my taste, so much so that there are two unopened boxes on a shelf in the back of my fridge from 2019!!

 

Patty

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, broker1217 said:

Are you suggesting that US airlines allow COVID positive passengers to fly?

 

Given that there is neither a testing nor vaccination requirement for 95+% of flights by USA airlines, I'd say that the answer is:  Yes, they can fly.

Edited by FlyerTalker
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7 hours ago, broker1217 said:

I'm with you.

I booked based on fully vaccinated and on June 30th they changed to allow unvaccinated children.

I knew the first cruises would not be 100% crew vaccinated so chose to go in September when I knew the crew would be vaccinated.

We will simply avoid any children. Probably not a huge issue in September.

But---another big disappointment with Crystal. Just as reading that the tenders and the transfers are not  as safe as they advertise.

 

Tenders were using distancing requirements and asking for you to wear a mask. The bus to the airport was packed but no different than the airplane we were about to board and also required masking. Crystal is doing an excellent job considering everything. Once on the ship I did not see one person, other than staff, wearing a mask.

7 hours ago, broker1217 said:

Um--how does someone with COVID pose no risk?

Are you suggesting that US airlines allow COVID positive passengers to fly?

Do you think that a vaccinated person who is COVID positive is somehow different than a non-vaccinated COVID positive person?

I am not trying to argue--I simply don't understand what you are saying.

Per the CDC a vaccinated person who contracts Covid has almost no risk of transmission. See attachments.

4 hours ago, FlyerTalker said:

 

Given that there is neither a testing nor vaccination requirement for 95+% of flights by USA airlines, I'd say that the answer is:  Yes, they can fly.

Exactly my point. I do not see the difference of an infected person flying in the US vs that same person flying in from the Bahamas.0DADF560-928E-4297-A02B-44DD86C8A629.thumb.jpeg.baaa584e41597c9a365f6778e0d087eb.jpeg

93E8C529-849B-4BC6-9226-3C8D4085D9A4.jpeg

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Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, tinaincc said:

Tenders were using distancing requirements and asking for you to wear a mask. The bus to the airport was packed but no different than the airplane we were about to board and also required masking. Crystal is doing an excellent job considering everything. Once on the ship I did not see one person, other than staff, wearing a mask.

Per the CDC a vaccinated person who contracts Covid has almost no risk of transmission. See attachments.

Exactly my point. I do not see the difference of an infected person flying in the US vs that same person flying in from the Bahamas.0DADF560-928E-4297-A02B-44DD86C8A629.thumb.jpeg.baaa584e41597c9a365f6778e0d087eb.jpeg

93E8C529-849B-4BC6-9226-3C8D4085D9A4.jpeg


The problem was, that was written before the surge of the delta variant here.  The mRNA vaccines are still efficacious against the delta variant, but topping out in the 80 percent range against severe infection and dropping significantly from there for mild and moderate infections — the days of relying just on the vaccines to prevent spread among a sporadically vaccinated population are waning.  
 

If 90+% of our population was vaccinated then lower vaccine efficacy wouldn’t be a concern, but with some states only having a third of their population vaccinated, this makes it more likely for vaccinated persons to get infected.

 

Thats also the science behind the CDC’s math on the vaccine guidance, and I assume Crystal’s child policy.

 

Vince

Edited by BWIVince
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On 7/25/2021 at 2:35 AM, Roel94 said:

Sorry children can not be vax. If crystal refused children on their ships there would be a lawsuit so fast. So you are wrong and need to get over it.

Not to mention it has been studied and children are not the spreaders. We need to stop demonizing kids in this pandemic.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, tinaincc said:

Not to mention it has been studied and children are not the spreaders. We need to stop demonizing kids in this pandemic.

 

 

CD349E70-1731-4E2D-919E-9FFC446B904E.jpeg

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Unfortunately this is old news. It pays to research the latest data and not data from almost a year ago.

This below is from the CDC:

Children and adolescents can be infected with SARS-CoV-2, can get sick with COVID-19, and can spread the virus to others.9-15  In the United States through March 2021, the estimated cumulative rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 symptomatic illness in children ages 5-17 years were comparable to infection and symptomatic illness rates in adults ages 18-49 and higher than rates in adults ages 50 and older.16  Estimated cumulative rates of infection and symptomatic illness in children ages 0-4 years are roughly half of those in children ages 5-17 years, but are comparable to those in adults ages 65 years or older.  These cumulative rates were estimated from CDC models that account for under-detection among reported cases.17

Several studies conducted early during the COVID-19 pandemic suggested that the incidence rate among children and adolescents was lower than among adults.9, 10, 18-23  However, the lower incidence rates may have been due in part to children, when compared to adults, having fewer opportunities for exposure (due to school, daycare, and activity closures) and a lower probability of being tested.17  Studies that have systematically tested children and adolescents, irrespective of symptoms, for acute SARS-CoV-2 infection (using antigen or RT-PCR assays) or prior infection (through antibody testing) have found their rates of infection can be comparable, and in some settings higher, than in adults.12, 15, 24-29

Children and adolescents can also transmit SARS-CoV-2 infection to others.  Early during the COVID-19 pandemic, children were not commonly identified as index cases in household or other clusters9, 10 largely because schools and extracurricular activities around the world were closed or no longer held in-person.  However, outbreaks among adolescents attending camps, sports events, and schools have demonstrated that adolescents can transmit SARS-CoV-2 to others.11, 14, 30  Furthermore, transmission studies that have examined secondary infection risk from children and adolescents to household contacts who are rapidly, frequently, and systematically tested demonstrate that transmission does occur.29, 31

Compared with adults, children and adolescents who are infected with SARS-CoV-2 are more commonly asymptomatic (never develop symptoms) or have mild, non-specific symptoms (e.g. headache, sore throat).32-36  Similar to adults with SARS-CoV-2 infections, children and adolescents can spread SARS-CoV-2 to others when they do not have symptoms or have mild, non-specific symptoms and thus might not know that they are infected and infectious. Children are less likely to develop severe illness or die from COVID-19.23, 37-39  Nonetheless, 271 COVID-19 deaths among persons ages 5-17 years and 120 deaths among those 0-4 years have been reported to the National Center for Health Statistics through July 7, 2021.8

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11 hours ago, Texas Tillie said:

I get those chocolates every cruise based on my number of cruises and most of the time I sail in steerage


same here!!! 😄😉

 

Nancy
 

 

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