Jump to content

P&O Standards dropped, probably never again.


Recommended Posts

I found Queen Elizabeth the friendliest and happiest ship of them all.

 

In view of my post above, when standing on her deck it did cross my mind "how did I end up here?

 

We usually go P and O. We love the overall experience.  We have never encountered real nastiness on any ship.  Thank goodness.

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I was lucky, lived in a semi with our own bathroom.  My parents held down 4 jobs at one point to bring 2 of us up.  I thought the person above thought Queen Elizabeth was the most friendly person they had met, until I read further!!🤣

Edited by jeanlyon
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, indiana123 said:

 

 

I was brought up in an attic in a large victorian house so I'm upper class with you.

 

(we wont mention sharing a toilet with two other families (11 people), or that the water supply was  behind a curtain across a landing down a flight of stairs, or sharing my parents room till I was 15, or having to ask the landlady if we could have a bath every now and then!!!!🤣

 

 

Blimey,you didn't live next door to Charles Dickens did you? He lived in Kent.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, indiana123 said:

 

 

I was brought up in an attic in a large victorian house so I'm upper class with you.

 

(we wont mention sharing a toilet with two other families (11 people), or that the water supply was  behind a curtain across a landing down a flight of stairs, or sharing my parents room till I was 15, or having to ask the landlady if we could have a bath every now and then!!!!🤣

 

 

Thats nowt, wen a'wor a lad there were 26 of us lived in a shoe box at bottom of a swamp, we used to get up 2 hours before we went to bed and work a 25 hour day dahn t'pit

  • Like 2
  • Haha 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, yorkshirephil said:

Thats nowt, wen a'wor a lad there were 26 of us lived in a shoe box at bottom of a swamp, we used to get up 2 hours before we went to bed and work a 25 hour day dahn t'pit

And you tell the young people of today and they don't believe you !

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, yorkshirephil said:

Thats nowt, wen a'wor a lad there were 26 of us lived in a shoe box at bottom of a swamp, we used to get up 2 hours before we went to bed and work a 25 hour day dahn t'pit

Blooooody loooxery.Me Mum made me sleep inside chimney at the top.Made me sweep it on't way down soes I got a bowl of soot fors me breakfast.Werent all bad,me Da used to light fire int winter.

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, brian1 said:

Blimey,you didn't live next door to Charles Dickens did you? He lived in Kent.

 

 

No we lived in Southeast London.  I think there was a class system in each catagory. We lived in Honor Oak, East Dulwich which was definitely classed as posher than surrounding areas even though it was mostly working class and even though we lived in the attic🤣)

 

BUT we always had nice food on the table..stodge maybe.. but that was how it was then.

 

Surely I'm not the only kid on here who scraped the ice off the inside of the bedroom windows before school.

Edited by indiana123
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, brian1 said:

Blooooody loooxery.Me Mum made me sleep inside chimney at the top.Made me sweep it on't way down soes I got a bowl of soot fors me breakfast.Werent all bad,me Da used to light fire int winter.

We lived like that for a while until the chimney got struck with lightening and I was then forced to sleep on the fire itself but as we couldn't afford to light it things didn't seem so bad .

Over the years though things got better when my dad got a job as a scarecrow  impersonator :classic_unsure:

We then became  what some would call "middle class " as my dad was outstanding in the field that he worked . I remember he once gave me a shiny old penny and said " Lad go and buy thee summat  but don't buy rubbish "  So with no more to do I went down town and bought me a 3 piece suit and booked a cruise on the old Queen Mary . On my return home my dad seemed pleased to see me and more so when I gave him his halfpenny change . See I remembered where I had came from and was honest enough to give dad his change . But as said by others they never believe you when you tell others .:classic_mellow:

 

  • Like 5
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, indiana123 said:

Surely I'm not the only kid on here who scraped the ice off the inside of the bedroom windows before school.

Indeed you're not. A hot brick wrapped in a towel in my bed to get it warm, a thick coat thrown over the blankets in case it got extra cold during the night. I loved looking at the frost ferns on the window or searching for the longest icicle on the guttering while snuggled in a warm bed.

Eee, these young un's today dun't know the born.😊

Avril

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, indiana123 said:

 

 

No we lived in Southeast London.  I think there was a class system in each catagory. We lived in Honor Oak, East Dulwich which was definitely classed as posher than surrounding areas even though it was mostly working class and even though we lived in the attic🤣)

 

BUT we always had nice food on the table..stodge maybe.. but that was how it was then.

 

Surely I'm not the only kid on here who scraped the ice off the inside of the bedroom windows before school.

Not only when at school. My first married quarter when I joined the police had no central heating or double glazing. I would get up for earlies, 5am, and have to wash and shave with ice inside the windows.  My first two children were born and lived until the eldest was 4 in those conditions !

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, indiana123 said:

 

 

No we lived in Southeast London.  I think there was a class system in each catagory. We lived in Honor Oak, East Dulwich which was definitely classed as posher than surrounding areas even though it was mostly working class and even though we lived in the attic🤣)

 

BUT we always had nice food on the table..stodge maybe.. but that was how it was then.

 

Surely I'm not the only kid on here who scraped the ice off the inside of the bedroom windows before school.

I remember all that when we moved to our luxury council house in the country (Dagenham).No fridge,milk in a bowl of water on doorstep.Gas copper in kitchen with hand pump to get water in the bath upstairs,lol.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Adawn47 said:

Indeed you're not. A hot brick wrapped in a towel in my bed to get it warm, a thick coat thrown over the blankets in case it got extra cold during the night. I loved looking at the frost ferns on the window or searching for the longest icicle on the guttering while snuggled in a warm bed.

Eee, these young un's today dun't know the born.😊

Avril

I remember all of this too well and I am glad that those days are gone, give me a nice centrally heated home any day.

I used to love getting home from school in the winter because mum would give us bovril to drink while we waited for our evening meal.  I will have to buy some bovril next winter lol.

My parents believed in cooking for the season, we had what ever vegetables were in season and during the winter there were homemade soups, stews and pies.

Thd kids today have no idea about seasonality. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be fair to our younger cruising generation (and I speak as a Boomer), our generation may have had outside toilets, no central heating, lino and maybe rugs on the floors, ice on the inside of the windows, no fitted kitchens and tin baths in the kitchen - but we also had free university education (not just tuition fees but also living grants), a sufficient supply of houses enabling many to buy their own houses on marriage, and enough local authority rental housing to accommodate those who couldn't. 

 

Very few homeless people then, jobs were secure, and final salary pension schemes were common.

 

We bought our first place in outer London (West Wickham) without any parental help in our very early twenties, and so did most of our friends - almost unheard of now.

 

I think we are very much the favoured generation.

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, Josy1953 said:

I remember all of this too well and I am glad that those days are gone, give me a nice centrally heated home any day.

I used to love getting home from school in the winter because mum would give us bovril to drink while we waited for our evening meal.  I will have to buy some bovril next winter lol.

My parents believed in cooking for the season, we had what ever vegetables were in season and during the winter there were homemade soups, stews and pies.

Thd kids today have no idea about seasonality. 

Bovril - lovely stuff.  Used to take a flask to work on winter nights.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Harry Peterson said:

To be fair to our younger cruising generation (and I speak as a Boomer), our generation may have had outside toilets, no central heating, lino and maybe rugs on the floors, ice on the inside of the windows, no fitted kitchens and tin baths in the kitchen - but we also had free university education (not just tuition fees but also living grants), a sufficient supply of houses enabling many to buy their own houses on marriage, and enough local authority rental housing to accommodate those who couldn't. 

 

Very few homeless people then, jobs were secure, and final salary pension schemes were common.

 

We bought our first place in outer London (West Wickham) without any parental help in our very early twenties, and so did most of our friends - almost unheard of now.

 

I think we are very much the favoured generation.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, ccpm said:

Wholeheartedly agree with financial bits but a lot of youngsters expect a lot now. For example my nephew was telling me the other day that yes hw was a bit down as he could't afford the latest apple watch as he had to get his dishwasher repaired. He has his own home at 24, a well paid job but his heart is broken because he wants everything now, right now. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Harry Peterson said:

To be fair to our younger cruising generation (and I speak as a Boomer), our generation may have had outside toilets, no central heating, lino and maybe rugs on the floors, ice on the inside of the windows, no fitted kitchens and tin baths in the kitchen - but we also had free university education (not just tuition fees but also living grants), a sufficient supply of houses enabling many to buy their own houses on marriage, and enough local authority rental housing to accommodate those who couldn't. 

 

Very few homeless people then, jobs were secure, and final salary pension schemes were common.

 

We bought our first place in outer London (West Wickham) without any parental help in our very early twenties, and so did most of our friends - almost unheard of now.

 

I think we are very much the favoured generation.

 

You forgot those nice Final Salary Pensions that so many of my fellow cruisers are so keen to tell me about over dinner 🤬

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Bobblehat71 said:

 

You forgot those nice Final Salary Pensions that so many of my fellow cruisers are so keen to tell me about over dinner 🤬

Correct the final salary pension some of us never got the opportunity to have, even though we kept the wheels of industry turning.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Bazrat said:

Correct the final salary pension some of us never got the opportunity to have, even though we kept the wheels of industry turning.

 

Some of us still are keeping the wheels of industry turning and will be for sometime 😪

 

Bring on the big ships and all inclusive drinks !!  I think Arvia could do with a few waterslides and a go-kart track to 🤣

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • Holiday Exchange - Jingle and Mingle 2021
      • ANNOUNCEMENT: Enjoy the Gift of Travel with Regent Seven Seas Cruises
      • ICYMI Cruise Critic Live Special Event: Q&A with Silversea Cruises
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...