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Sea Sickness


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I’m sure this will be sent over to the port of call forum. But keep in mind there are several drugs that do a great job of preventing sea sickness. For me, easier to just plan on taking one rather than trying to avoid waves in the ocean. 

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This might seem flippant to the OP but any answer to the question is meaningless.  Ships sail upon the sea and sea conditions are subject to change at any time.  It might be from the local winds, a nearby storm, or it could be so-called "long swells" which come from thousands of miles distant and can be very annoying.   So we agree with the prior post that rather then worrying about sea conditions just take the usual precautions to deal with mal de mer.  I suggest the OP talk to their own physician.   That being said, the most common over-the-counter medication for sea sickness is Meclizine Hcl which can be purchased at most pharmacies by asking for the generic.  There are also brand names on the shelves including Bonine and Dramamine Non-drowsy.  Please note that the normal "Dramamine" is not the same thing as their non-drowsy (which is actually Meclizine Hcl).   Others love sea bands (also available at many pharmacies or ginger

 

Hank

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As I’m one who has even gotten ill on a flat-calm sea (yet did well in rough weather…go figure!!), I’ve tried everything.

 

I suggest looking at ReliefBands. They are FDA approved for many conditions that might produce tummy troubles. My DH has used my band to quell queasiness from a medication he had to take; (he doesn’t get seasick). We’ve also had the band at the ready post-surgery in case it was needed.

 

It has worked very, very well for me for seasickness and I highly recommend it. It is pricey but there are different versions (I have the slick-looking one). They just came out with a waterproof version that my sister bought to have in addition to her dressier version. I used my FSA card to purchase.

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I was in the area just last year, Feb/Mar. I don't remember the water being rough. Although, what some people consider rough, it is not to me. The sea is mysterious. One day it could be calm and the next your in for a ride. Better to have meds with and not need them, than not have them and need them. If you get rough waters, there will be a run on what meds you can get at the gift shop. A few years back I was on a Med cruise. Hit was pretty rough water. The final leg was across the Atlantic in December. After the first day crossing, it was the smoothest water on the whole cruise.

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18 hours ago, navybankerteacher said:

If you are prone to seasickness, Long Island Sound or Chesapeake Bay might be best avoided -  the fact is:  no cruising area is a sure thing -- take meds, get used to being at  sea, or stay home.

 

For sure.  We came in either Seattle or San Francisco (can't remember which) once at the end of a cruise.  They tried to do the dinner service but cancelled it and sent everyone back to their cabins and told everyone to stay low and maybe stay in their beds.  We got served sandwiches brought to our cabin about 10 PM when things finally calmed down. 

 

You can get bad seas anywhere and any time.  

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There have been times when overwater bungalows on Bora Bora or Moorea were partially submerged during storms, so be prepared just as you would be on any sea/ocean journey.

 

There is no way to predict how seas will be when you cruise.  The only seasonal adjustment is that big waves will come from one direction in one season and then reverse direction 6 months later.  Storms can occur anytime - google "pacific typhoon forecasts" for guesstimates.

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Posted (edited)

It all boils down to what you are used to (and at least a little of what  you convince yourself is happening).  Probably the roughest seas I experience on a cruise was the first day out of New York on HAL’s Noordam in January 2007.  I was in the furthest forward cabin, port side, lowest passenger deck - just aft of the theatre. I woke to looking at solid green water outside my window as we plowed through 30+ foot seas.  There were very, very few people out and about that morning - but I loved it —- slightly reminiscent of a heavy sea day on a Rudderow class destroyer escort.

Edited by navybankerteacher
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29 minutes ago, navybankerteacher said:

I woke to looking at solid green water outside my window as we plowed through 30+ foot seas.  

We were on a small Hurtigruten ship with a real porthole. When we returned from dinner it had been closed. No stabilizers on that old ship and we rocked and rolled all night. I loved it.

 

norwegianstorm.jpg

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Posted (edited)
59 minutes ago, clo said:

We were on a small Hurtigruten ship with a real porthole. When we returned from dinner it had been closed. No stabilizers on that old ship and we rocked and rolled all night. I loved it.

 

norwegianstorm.jpg

Some people will drive for many hours, spend many dollars, and wait many minutes in line for some amusement park ride which doesn't come near the feeling given by a ship moving through good seas -- accompanied by the creaking and groaning as she flexes.

Edited by navybankerteacher
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On 7/26/2021 at 10:57 PM, gotta cruise again said:

As I’m one who has even gotten ill on a flat-calm sea (yet did well in rough weather…go figure!!), I’ve tried everything.

 

I suggest looking at ReliefBands. They are FDA approved for many conditions that might produce tummy troubles. My DH has used my band to quell queasiness from a medication he had to take; (he doesn’t get seasick). We’ve also had the band at the ready post-surgery in case it was needed.

 

It has worked very, very well for me for seasickness and I highly recommend it. It is pricey but there are different versions (I have the slick-looking one). They just came out with a waterproof version that my sister bought to have in addition to her dressier version. I used my FSA card to purchase.

 

Wow, thanks for posting this. I had never heard of these things before. I have the cheapo sea bands that do nothing. Even with sea sickness meds I can still get a little queasy in rough seas so looking into these.

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At risk of raining on any parades 😁

Latitude wise, Tahiti is circa 18  degrees south …

I have been on one ship where we sailed great circle from Nagoya to Los Angeles … we went quite far north and the sea was like the proverbial millpond …

I have also sailed on one where we ended up in the lifeboats … we were 18 degrees north and the weather was vile. Cold, wet, windy (f7/8) … one typhoon had just eased off and another was brewing. 
Bottom line .. no one call tell until much nearer the time … ie look out of the window 😁

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