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Is tipping in cash still preferred by cruise staff ?


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25 minutes ago, zitsky said:

 

I would prefer to give tips to people who earn it.  Yes I think salaries are low but then we should have minimum wage laws.  Should I give the pool $100 because they are sharing instead of the $20 I was going to give the waiter? 

I think I get what you are saying here.  You tip cash for the server who is taking care of you, with the intention he/she gets to keep it?  That makes total sense to me!  I like to think the same as well.  However with that said IF the tips are in fact pooled, I’d hope the $ was being shared with the staff working on that shift together.  But as far as my butler, room steward and attendant I want them to each have and keep 100% of whatever I decide to give them.

Edited by LGW59
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Other than the auto grats that go to waiter/stateroom attendant, etc., with regard to tips pooled from those who have pre-paid beverage packages and the like, I just let the ship work that out.  I really don't care.  I just take care of individuals as I see fit.

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42 minutes ago, markeb said:


The gratuities from bar tabs, alcohol or otherwise, are separate from the per day auto gratuities. And presumably a separate tip pool. 

Agree. Auto gratuities go to the stateroom attendant, waiter and assistant waiter. 

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The more I read the more I support higher wages and the elimination of tipping.  Maybe the hostess deserves a tip?  What about the person that delivers the food?  The janitor? 

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9 minutes ago, zitsky said:

The more I read the more I support higher wages and the elimination of tipping.  Maybe the hostess deserves a tip?  What about the person that delivers the food?  The janitor? 


Absurd examples. The cruise lines operate internationally, but US labor law is the only real precedent, and maybe the cruise lines follow that precedent. So…

 

Hostess, front of house, maybe in tip pool, probably depends on restaurant 

Person delivering food, front of house, tip pool

Janitor (dishwasher, etc.), back of house, not in a tip pool

Sommelier, generally receives tips based on wine sales, but sometimes on all alcohol sales, shipboard unknown

 

But always front of house. Not back of house. And even without a pool a successful front of house waiter or bartender is sharing with their helpers. They need clean glasses and clean tables. 

 

 

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I must admit I actually pre-tipped a couple of times. Once, on a cruise our three teenage/early twenties boys had a separate cabin from Mrs. Dawg and myself. At home each boy's room was always a disaster, so you can imagine what their combined cabin looked like. 💥

 

I gave their Cabin Steward a fair-sized tip when I met him on the first day. It wasn't to bribe him for extra service, it was his hazardous duty pay for the cruise! 😁

 

P.S. Now that they are are older and have their own places they are all clean freaks. They also don't wreck the cars they used their own money to buy. Wonder why? 🤔

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9 hours ago, zitsky said:

The more I read the more I support higher wages and the elimination of tipping.  Maybe the hostess deserves a tip?  What about the person that delivers the food?  The janitor? 

 

Host/Hostess staff will accept tips, while I haven't tipped them I'd imagine some may allow you to skip the wait if you do so.  If you get room service gratuities will be expected.

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On 8/15/2021 at 11:03 PM, zitsky said:

 

So what was a huge motivator for your staff?

I always had very low turnover and had people who enjoyed making people happy.  Staff was treated with respect and kept in loop on all changes and situations.  Was not hard just was very thorough on interview process and reviews.  There was always a opening for advancing oneself if that was what the person was looking for.  For SR management whenever I hired someone I took it as a perspective would they have the ability or drive to replace me, I went into properties as a trouble shooter in a sense, cleaned up places when badly run.  I had high standards and always surrounded myself with people who saw the same or better.  

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The problem is really the nomenclature.  We as cruisers are supplementing salaries of the crew on board.  The cruise line calls that automatic gratuities.  Clearly it is a per night wage tax for passengers. And a bar supplement even with beverage packages.   So it really should not be considered as anything else and IMO should never be removed.  It is part of the crew's salary.  That is the current system.  So one option is for cruise lines to increase the daily cabin rate to us and pay the crew more.  Same difference in terms of what we pay out of pocket.  Then we could go back to traditional cash tipping if we want to thank somebody for special service.  And call it tipping.

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13 minutes ago, TeeRick said:

The problem is really the nomenclature.  We as cruisers are supplementing salaries of the crew on board.  The cruise line calls that automatic gratuities.  Clearly it is a per night wage tax for passengers. And a bar supplement even with beverage packages.   So it really should not be considered as anything else and IMO should never be removed.  It is part of the crew's salary.  That is the current system.  So one option is for cruise lines to increase the daily cabin rate to us and pay the crew more.  Same difference in terms of what we pay out of pocket.  Then we could go back to traditional cash tipping if we want to thank somebody for special service.  And call it tipping.

It all probably is classified as it is because of how it looks on the books financially, taxes etc.  With how wonderfully complicated corporate finance is calling it gratuities probably is the way they need to do it.  I will digress to anyone who is into corporate accounting to be able to make it clearer or so.  I know with some of the places I worked out, somewhat all inclusive the tips were added extra to the rate because not taxed on it.  Employee yes was taxed on the tips in there check, just a very convoluted mess overall.    

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1 hour ago, NutsAboutGolf said:

 

Host/Hostess staff will accept tips, while I haven't tipped them I'd imagine some may allow you to skip the wait if you do so.  If you get room service gratuities will be expected.

This is where I have a problem with a tipping culture. I know you are just giving a hypothetical example of someone potentially skipping a queue if they tip but for me that is just wrong. That’s when a tip becomes a bribe.

 

While people should be able to do as they see fit with tips for good service not if it moves into the area of expectation that they can get better/ faster service/ better table allocation etc than other customers. We all paid for the cruise so we all deserve decent service and fair treatment, not just those who bribe the staff for it.

 

I know I come from a different culture but that’s my take on it. Charge an appropriate amount for the cruise to pay staff then get back to tips being for great service which has been rendered, as a mark of appreciation.

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26 minutes ago, Eglesbrech said:

This is where I have a problem with a tipping culture. I know you are just giving a hypothetical example of someone potentially skipping a queue if they tip but for me that is just wrong. That’s when a tip becomes a bribe.

 

While people should be able to do as they see fit with tips for good service not if it moves into the area of expectation that they can get better/ faster service/ better table allocation etc than other customers. We all paid for the cruise so we all deserve decent service and fair treatment, not just those who bribe the staff for it.

 

I know I come from a different culture but that’s my take on it. Charge an appropriate amount for the cruise to pay staff then get back to tips being for great service which has been rendered, as a mark of appreciation.

 

How much do people tip the baggage porters at the terminal?

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5 minutes ago, zitsky said:

 

How much do people tip the baggage porters at the terminal?

$2.00/bag, which is same that I do if/when I use curbside check in at the airport 

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42 minutes ago, LGW59 said:

$2.00/bag, which is same that I do if/when I use curbside check in at the airport 

Good for you--

Anything less and your bags might end up in " who knows where " instead of  where you were sending them to.

Same with the Porters at the cruise terminal.

They call it " Knowing how to say Thank You ".

And, bye the way--- Handing a tip to the restaurant Hostess at the beginning of the cruise is a very good " Insurance policy "

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29 minutes ago, Pinboy said:

Good for you--

Anything less and your bags might end up in " who knows where " instead of  where you were sending them to.

Same with the Porters at the cruise terminal.

They call it " Knowing how to say Thank You ".

And, bye the way--- Handing a tip to the restaurant Hostess at the beginning of the cruise is a very good " Insurance policy "

Handing a tip to the restaurant Hostess at the beginning of the cruise is a very good " Insurance policy "  To some this is a "bribe" so tip, gratuity, bribe, whatever you call it, it works and is always appreciated.  Nothing better than a two top by the window!

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1 hour ago, Eglesbrech said:

This is where I have a problem with a tipping culture. I know you are just giving a hypothetical example of someone potentially skipping a queue if they tip but for me that is just wrong. That’s when a tip becomes a bribe.

 

While people should be able to do as they see fit with tips for good service not if it moves into the area of expectation that they can get better/ faster service/ better table allocation etc than other customers. We all paid for the cruise so we all deserve decent service and fair treatment, not just those who bribe the staff for it.

 

I know I come from a different culture but that’s my take on it. Charge an appropriate amount for the cruise to pay staff then get back to tips being for great service which has been rendered, as a mark of appreciation.

e - I fully understand your position on this and you are not alone, believe me.

 

My position - I do not consider it necessarily a bribe vs asking in advance for 'more' great service?

 

Yes, we all did pay for the cruise, some more and some less than others, so not sure how that plays into the equation.

 

Not sure about others, yet I have seen where some passengers use bullying tactics to gain better service and priorities vs cash or some other type of gift. Sooo, cash tactic is far better than bullying, I Am sure in the eyes of the staff or so I believe. Niceness goes a long way too...

 

When you say "charge an appropriate amount..." what is the base rate you would consider to be appropriate? With costs and wages changing regularly, how can one really hit that target and remain profitable in the process? Moving target.

 

While I have to do some reading up on it, I do wonder how this was handled during the Golden Age of Cruise Ship travel, especially comparing in each sailing class on each ship?

 

bon voyage

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1 hour ago, zitsky said:

 

How much do people tip the baggage porters at the terminal?

 

Add this to your spreadsheet, they're often the first interaction you have during the start of your vacation who are often super friendly to you.  Most are well paid with great benefits and sometimes receive a pension.  Not sure if this is still the case but Port Canaveral used to have a sign that says, "Do not tip porters as they are salaried."  Many still tip them anyways.

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4 minutes ago, rucrazy said:

I for one don't know anyone that dislikes CA$H (usd)

Of course, and it would be fun for them to count the ca$h while they eat the fruitcake.

 

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Just now, LGW59 said:

Of course, and it would be fun for them to count the ca$h while they eat the fruitcake.

 

Personally I would pass on the fruitcake! but that is just me!!

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2 hours ago, zitsky said:

 

How much do people tip the baggage porters at the terminal?

£1 a bag but they have completed the service when I do that as our bags go through a “hole in the wall” from the car. I don’t get anything more or less service wise by tipping them.

 

Many people in the U.K. don’t tip for bags, you see it regularly. Minimum wage applies so not seen as essential.

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51 minutes ago, Bo1953 said:

e - I fully understand your position on this and you are not alone, believe me.

 

My position - I do not consider it necessarily a bribe vs asking in advance for 'more' great service?

 

Yes, we all did pay for the cruise, some more and some less than others, so not sure how that plays into the equation.

 

Not sure about others, yet I have seen where some passengers use bullying tactics to gain better service and priorities vs cash or some other type of gift. Sooo, cash tactic is far better than bullying, I Am sure in the eyes of the staff or so I believe. Niceness goes a long way too...

 

When you say "charge an appropriate amount..." what is the base rate you would consider to be appropriate? With costs and wages changing regularly, how can one really hit that target and remain profitable in the process? Moving target.

 

While I have to do some reading up on it, I do wonder how this was handled during the Golden Age of Cruise Ship travel, especially comparing in each sailing class on each ship?

 

bon voyage

As we are not seasoned tippers here in the U.K. when any company tells us we are paying gratuities as part of the price then that’s that - many folks here assume that the “always included tip” means just what it says and that nothing further is needed or expected. It’s a fair assumption based on the publicity.

 

If that is not the case then add the amount of the auto gratuity (which differs by cabin grade in our pricing structure) into the basic price and then let people know that a tip for good service would be appropriate.

 

Those who pay more for the cruise already get more eg Blu and Luminae etc

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6 minutes ago, Eglesbrech said:

Many people in the U.K. don’t tip for bags, you see it regularly.

LOL--- Same in Canada

BUT--- They end up filling in " Lost Luggage " forms and spend their whole vacation in a tshirt, sloppy shorts, and Birkenstock sandals. 

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