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2 1/2 Hour Power Failure on Liberty 3/22


mfs2k

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According to the OP, the ship was dead in the water for approximately 2 hours and 15 minutes.

 

The ship arrived in Colon approx 1hr 30min late. If they were going so slow, when did they make up the 45 mins? :confused:

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According to the OP, the ship was dead in the water for approximately 2 hours and 15 minutes.

 

The ship arrived in Colon approx 1hr 30min late. If they were going so slow, when did they make up the 45 mins? :confused:

 

The ship was due to arrive in Colon at 7am. It docked at 9:30am. Not to mention that the clocks were put ahead an hour that night, but that really doesn't have anything to do with it..... But I did have to think about it for a sec......

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Nah, it never fails... as soon as one of the hosts is gone, things go crazy... and people will post just about anything knowing that the hosts are limited... it's going to be an interesting week :rolleyes:

 

He's not gone, yet. I keep hearing drunky talk on board.

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Free for me. Definition of a good time is relative. Crawling from bar to bar is not mine.

 

To each his/her own... I can play around on the internet at home, I have not desire to do it as soon as I step foot on a ship. They aren't crawling from bar to bar by the way :D

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Free for me. Definition of a good time is relative. Crawling from bar to bar is not mine.

 

And you needed to post this twice because??

 

BTW Zyd... aren't you going to miss the muster drill? Or are you still at home??? :p

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Valid? Perhaps there is a small chance of that. Likely? No.

 

I think you would be in the minority of cruisers who would truly believe that there wasn't some technical reasoning behind the ship sailing slowly into Panama and fast upon departure.

 

I think you'd be very hard pressed to find anyone to support your theory that the captain ran the ship at low speed just to ruin everyone's day in Panama (except for auntie, who also clearly stated her belief the captain went slow just to be a jerk).

 

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree.

 

Now now, I never said the Captain purposely did this to ruin everyone's day. In fact, I clearly stated that I didn't believe that was his intent. What I said is I believe he played it cautious going slowly to Panama - but hauled ass on the way home (with no sea testing of any repairs in between). Why - probably because he knew there would be far more hell to pay if he did not get back on time to FLL so he was willing to risk the problem reoccurring then vs. risk it reoccurring just to get to Panama when he would only be inconveniencing several hundred passengers by doing so.

 

But if you don't find that plausible, you are right, we will have to agree to disagree

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I'm getting a headache -- I've only read six pages of this thread, and I'll have to pick it up later, none of it is making sense to my poor aching head right now. :confused: But the comment below is the funniest thing I've read today. :D

 

There was a guy in the casino bar wearing his life jacket! I laughed so hard. Carnival didn't like this one bit and made him take it off. What a great time. I am looking for the next big cruise and will go with carnival I'm sure.

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having hopped between many bars on many cruises, I have gleaned the following uncertifiable scrutiable info on electric ship systems:

1.the first electric cruise ship was the Canberra built in the middle of the last century

2. diesel generators generated electricity. the propellers were turned by electric motors

3. the Canberra design very slowly became the standard design for cruise ships as well as modern ocean liners such as the QM2

4. if the electric technicians on board don't get enuf exercise by bar hopping they tend to fall asleep at the switchboard(connects the generators to the motors and other ship systems) and things go awry

5. yell "short circuit" as loud as you can when returning to your cabin in the wee hours a.m. to make sure the technicians arent asleeep

;)

it is better to count sheep to fall asleep than recount all the things that went wrong on cruises I have been on.

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  • 1 year later...

Hey Hey,

 

I am a former crew member for Norwegian Cruise Line. I'm here to give you a little in depth information on "blackouts"

 

Firstly:

- Electricity is generated by electric motors which are run from the ship's diesel engines. The power is generated as long as the ship's engines are running. There are many different reasons why the ship's diesel engines cut out during the evening in question. I do not have an answer to that.

 

- When a blackout occurs ALL ship-board syatems are affected. Especially within the forst 30 seconds to 1 minute during the period between power failure and the time that the generator kicks in. You will notice on many modern cruise ships that some of the lights in the ceilings have a red dot next to them. These lights are run by a battery and will stay illuminated the moment the blackout occurs.

 

- Generators kick in and can last a while (i believe they are fed from the ship's diesel fuel; however i'm not 100% sure) Once the generators kick in, depending on the ship they can power as little as a few lights and computer systems to as much as minimal air circulation, elevator operation and ship-wide PA systems. (crew areas are usually located below the lowest deck that has passenger cabins) Most crew are NOT allowed in passenger areas when not on duty so it is essential that air circulation to those areas be maintained.

 

- Ships will not neccessarialy drop anchor unless the depth of the ocean warrants it. Ships have sophisticated electronic equipment to aid them in getting back on course once the power has been restored

 

- Slow restoration of power: Once ship's engineers have pinpointed (and repaired) the reason for the power failure, circuits can only be brought back online one at a time to prevent a ship-wide power surge and also to not overload the systems. The emergency generators stay running for a period of time AFTER electricity has been restored in case another blackout occurs.

 

Hope this answers any concerns... If anything i have said is wrong in your eyes - please note that this is from my training on board an NCL vessel and may not reflect the policies, procedures or ways other vessels and carriers operate.

 

I was only cruise staff... not 1st Engineer...

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