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DISPOSABLE Underwater Cameras for Snorkling


RDMOREU

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Have never snorkled, so am sure I won't be going too deep lol! There are several brands of these disposable underwater cameras available. Can anyone give me some advice as to which brand of camera might be better, which ones to avoid, etc. Also, do you request any 'special' developing? Thanks for any help - really appreciate it!
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We went on underwater scooters with Bobs, and we used the kodkas and friend used figi's. Our pictures all turned out great.. Hers was not all great. She ended up making second prints off mine.. Hope this helps.. [img]http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/12/12_1_111.gif[/img]
NOTE:
Walmart has them the cheapest... price.. [img]http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/12/12_1_102.gif[/img]
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Use a Fugi. Their film is better for underwater color. I use Fugi Film when I scuba dive and have found the color is better than Kodak. Clarity of the picture depends on clarity of the water and whether there is any silt or sand or other sediment suspended in the water. Remember you have to get close to get a good picture of fish.

Hope this helps. Have fun.
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I've used Kodak and Fuji and have gotten decent results with both. You'll get the best photos on a sunny day. You don't need to request anything special for processing. Just drop off the camera and you're done.
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I've used both Fuji and Kodak but prefer Kodak. For best results, try to shoot when the sun is shining and be as close as possible to your subject, for two reasons.

These cameras are focused to inifinity so if you are very far from your subject you'll barely be able to see it. They are much like disposable cameras on land. Your subject never comes out a large as you thought it would, generally appearing as though you were a long way away when you took the picture.

Second, if there is too much water between you and your subject, all of your photos will have a blue cast to them. This happens because other light spectrums are filtered out when they hit the water, leaving only blue light to penetrate. You will get a lot of "blue water" in your pictures if you are too far away. Try to be within one to two feet of your subject.
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I've used Kodak and Fuji and had better results with Fuji. As mentioned above - the quality of the photo depends on the amount of light and clarity of the water. My photos of the the sting rays in Grand Cayman were great!
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I personally like Fugi over Kodak. I would also recommend taking your film to a small personal developer. Sometimes the larger retail stores lose your film or expose your negatives. :)
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