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Cruising With A Service Dog....everything You Ever Wanted To Know!


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Roz, What did you mean by the comments about the Golden? I always get so mad at some of the stupid people making stupid uneducated comments about our dogs. They should be so smart and so clean as our dogs are!

I'm glad that you had a good time and are going again in January. The more that we are seen on ships maybe the less stupid comments we will hear! Have a good time. Carnival isn't it?

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Inflatable Man: Yeah! I'm so glad that you're taking Tyrone with you.....He should always be part of your "pack!" Try practicing with the ice (so he gets used to the feel/coldness, etc.) and try letting him hold his urine for longer and longer periods. Brenda thinks the ice chip is a toy and will play with it, in her mouth, until it melts. It's so cute.....

All the practicing is good for everyone. It makes you feel more comfortable when the "real thing" comes along!

The ship we were on, in September and again in November was the Golden Princess. Someone had written about how poor the service/staff/food and maintenance of the ship was......NOT FOR US! It was magnificent.....I loved every moment! I'd do it again, in January but it's time to spread our wings.....We have booked the Costa Majica, in Brazil and the Carnival Pride.

Traveling with a Service Dog lends new meaning to the word "fun!"

Aint life grand!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

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People who are disabled and travelling with a trained service dog can get their seat(s) in the bulkhead row (as long as it isn't an exit row, which on some planes/airlines it is, grr) as per the law.

LOL!!! :D Sometimes drinking lots of water is a sign of health trouble, so if you haven't had him checked for anything that causes that, you might want to make sure he's fine. (Some dogs just drink a lot of water.)

 

We did get bulkhead seats on some flights and it worked well. But on one or two planes the bulkhead had no more legroom than a grgular row. That meant there was less room for the dog. And on the flight where we were between two businessmen we got on close to departure and the bulkhead seats were already taken even though I had called and said I was bringing a guide dog in training. It was easier for everyone for us to just take the center seat. It gave Heidi good practice too (and me more confidence).

 

Our current puppy does drink a lot but it's not excessive - just much more than our first two puppies, one of which drank very little. She was always healthy and we tried to get her to drink more but she didn't want to. The vet isn't concerned about our current charge.

 

For people who haven't flown much, or cruised for that matter, with their dogs I have a suggestion. Get some latex gloves and pet your dog with them for several days before they have to go through the security check. Our puppy raiser group where we used to live got to go to a major airport once a year and even went through security into the terminal. This was post 9/11 but we had special permission and ther were some requirements and planning. Anyway some of the puppies backed away from the latex gloves which the security people wore. Our group was also practice for the security people. The supervisors welcomed us for the training aspect. Once we learned that the latex smell or feel was a concern to some of the puppies we pet them with gloves on so they got used to the gloves.

 

One time when we were flying that asked to have the dog go through before me. I was rather surprised that the dog's all metal training collar didnt' set off the alarm. :eek: The other times that we flew when she was wearing that collar the metal detector went off. So much for security.

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I use "latex" gloves (like the ones you would use to wash dishes), for grooming Brenda. They're great for getting off the extra fur that just klings on to her coat.

Your training, for the pups, serves a dual purpose, who knew!

"Set-ups" and desensitization for pups in training and even for our fully trained service dogs is a wonderful thing. It helps to keep the dogs "sharp" and even can keep them from getting bored.

The inconsistency in all security venues is a true amazment to me....the general public will NEVER see it as much as we, with these dogs, will!!!!!! :(

Thanks so much, for all that you do to make sure that folks in need of these miracle workers can get one! :)

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Hi Folks

 

In reference to how long my little guide dog has gone without relief due to flights, the answer would have to be the longest series of flights took 12 hours - Oz had no problem. He tends to sleep most of the time on flights. I make sure he voids well just before the adventure starts and has water on the flights.

 

At the end of the flight, I take him out immediately to void, before I even get my checked bags.

 

If the altitude is bothering him, he yawns. Now, how did he learn this? But, it appears to help.

 

Hope all is well in your world.

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MCDW: How nice to hear from you and Oz!

Brenda does the yawn thing too! Their ear drums are defintely built differently than ours but they do feel the pressure of altitude! I even know of a service dog who suffers from "altitude sickness!" They don't fly anymore!!!!!

 

Have a Happy, Healthy & Hairy Holiday Season, Everyone!!!!!!!

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We did get bulkhead seats on some flights and it worked well. But on one or two planes the bulkhead had no more legroom than a grgular row. That meant there was less room for the dog. And on the flight where we were between two businessmen we got on close to departure and the bulkhead seats were already taken even though I had called and said I was bringing a guide dog in training. It was easier for everyone for us to just take the center seat. It gave Heidi good practice too (and me more confidence).

 

Yeah, it depends on the plane - airlines don't seem to be very accommodating these days. (For example, some employees [even on the phones] don't want SDs on their planes and the only against-it responses to the DOT's proposed rule changes about SDs when they had public comments open were from the airlines [plus one lone guy with allergies who didn't seem to understand the need for ppl to have SDs - actually, I think he had a lawyer write it for him].) Some airlines make all their bulkheads exit rows, which means an SD has to squeeze into/under a regular seat - not fun!

 

Even a disabled person can lose their bulkhead seat if they check in at the airport too late, so I'm not surprised that you lost the bulkhead as a non-disabled person. (Non-disabled ppl and dogs in training aren't covered under the ACAA. The airline can choose to let you on and give you the bulkhead, but they by no means have to.) Also, it could've been that a disabled person needed the bulkhead on that plane. Typically you need to call at least 24 hours in advance of the flight to reserve the bulkhead due to an SD or prosthetic.

 

Our current puppy does drink a lot but it's not excessive - just much more than our first two puppies, one of which drank very little. She was always healthy and we tried to get her to drink more but she didn't want to. The vet isn't concerned about our current charge.

 

That's good. :) My girl doesn't tend to drink all that much, either, unless a treat she's had has made her thirsty - plus when she comes home from the groomer's.

 

For people who haven't flown much, or cruised for that matter, with their dogs I have a suggestion. Get some latex gloves and pet your dog with them for several days before they have to go through the security check. Our puppy raiser group where we used to live got to go to a major airport once a year and even went through security into the terminal. This was post 9/11 but we had special permission and ther were some requirements and planning. Anyway some of the puppies backed away from the latex gloves which the security people wore. Our group was also practice for the security people. The supervisors welcomed us for the training aspect. Once we learned that the latex smell or feel was a concern to some of the puppies we pet them with gloves on so they got used to the gloves.

 

That is really great that they gave the group permission to do that! Yeah, I guess the latex (do they still use latex? That would be a problem for ppl with latex allergies!) gloves might be something some dogs have to get used to - not just for the airports, but also for doctor, hospital, rehab (PT/OT), dentist, and such trips with their future partner, although they won't be getting patted by the docs/nurses in those situations (at least not with gloves on).

 

One time when we were flying that asked to have the dog go through before me. I was rather surprised that the dog's all metal training collar didnt' set off the alarm. :eek: The other times that we flew when she was wearing that collar the metal detector went off. So much for security.

 

Wow, I'm really surprised it didn't set the thing off, too! It usually doesn't take much to set those things off, especially when it comes to dog gear which tends to have metal parts.

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  • 1 month later...

 

 

I love walking her, on deck. And seeing her face when the ship rolls out to sea. She loves the smell of the salt air. We play ball on deck and the attention she gets from the crew and other passengers is always welcome! I can't imagine a cruise without her! :p

 

I hope this isn't a stupid question, but I like to be informed.

Is your handicap visual? For some reason I thought it was but then you were talking about seeing her face so I am confused.:confused: Maybe you have partial vision.

I trained drug detection k-9's for years and thats why this thread go my attention. Because the training for the dogs is so detailed and in depth.

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No, I am not visually impaired.....I see wonderfully!

Brenda has been formally trained to do "hearing, search and rescue" and does "mobility" work! She's an amazing dog with a phenomenal work ethic!

If you've worked with K-9's who are formally trained to do "one" thing you would be amazed at the quantity and quality of work that Brenda can do!

If we ever meet, I'd be happy to show you just some of what she does....working with these dogs....you would truly appreciate her!!!!!

I've socialized her, a lot! Because she has to live in my world, which is full of "people", all the time...we love to travel...so, she can be a bit too friendly, at times and I have to literally reign her in....but, she comes back to the "working mode" easily and is so food driven, that work becomes the real fun in life!!!!!!

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Oh our dogs did more than one thing lol.:)

We also would take them into the schools and teach kids about the dangers of illegal and abusing legal drugs.

I have prob taught over 500 programs.

One of the fave tricks the kids liked my dogs to do was I would give the command to sit and stay, I would then tell the kids to call the dog when I left the room. You could hear the kids yelling all down the halls, and I never had a dog break his/her command one time. :D

They were also taught to lay down during gun fire which can be daunting for any dog.

I could go on and on, but all in all I would say they functioned at a 5 year old level other than vocally.:)

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Shirley: Aren't they amazing! I always get a kick out of people who can't get their dogs to stop barking or to simply sit.....and then I watch Brenny and dogs that I'm sure you've been involved with and the things they can do and the manners that they've been taught to exhibit and I'm always so impressed and so proud.

The control and attention to detail is mind boggleing!!!!!

I, too, take Brenny into schools and service organizations to showcase her many talents and hard work! I love doing this and so does she!!!

Don't you work with dogs anymore?

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Then there are the folks who look at our dogs and say, "Gee, I wish my kid/grandkid behaved that well!" ;)

 

Oh yeah - then there was the Disney World employee who was shocked that I could get my dog to - get this - lay down on command, LOL!! I'm sure he must've been from another country to be so shocked about that, but even still, he'd seen my dog standing next to me and all for several minutes before then.

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Quam: Hi, did you take your cruise, yet?

I love to watch Brenny (all 75 pounds of her) laying quietly, under a table, not a sound, not a stir, not a sniff, not a whimper....NOTHING!!!! ;)

And, then I look around and there are children running "amuck", screaming, walking on the tables, jumping on the booth, manhandling the supplies on the tables, rubbing their handprints on the windows, etc., etc. Need I say more?

I have walked Brenny over to a table or in the showroom of unruly children (of all ages) and reminded them and their parents that children can be taught to behave!

Mind you, I am not comparing children to dogs or any animals of any kind.....I am simply saying that the techniques that are used for training of them can be applied to everyone! To be "calm and assertive", certainly works for me, on the job!!!!!

I have raised 3 very successful children and all I had to do was give them the "look" and there was civility in everyone's lives! :p

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Quam: Hi, did you take your cruise, yet?

Not yet, but soon - less than a month! :D We just got back from a land vacation yesterday (had Internet access there - my last post was written while there), so are taking it easy today. The plane we flew back on had the biggest bulkhead I've sat in as of yet, which was nice! (JetBlue's A320 or some number like that. This trip was my first on JetBlue [we had their other type of plane on the way to our vacation], but the experience was great.)

 

I love to watch Brenny (all 75 pounds of her) laying quietly, under a table, not a sound, not a stir, not a sniff, not a whimper....NOTHING!!!! ;)

 

And, then I look around and there are children running "amuck", screaming, walking on the tables, jumping on the booth, manhandling the supplies on the tables, rubbing their handprints on the windows, etc., etc. Need I say more?

Exactly! Although, I don't know if I've seen kids actually ON tables - yikes!! A few weeks ago I was eating at a Macaroni Grill restaurant and noticed some of the stones on the wall had been colored on with the restaurant-supplied crayons by a child. It wasn't some quick job, either, as there were enough strokes there that the child must've been doing it for quite a while - obviously the parents didn't care that their kid was defacing the wall of a restaurant!!

 

I have walked Brenny over to a table or in the showroom of unruly children (of all ages) and reminded them and their parents that children can be taught to behave!

Wow, now that's a bold move!!! Some of those parents can be hostile about somebody bringing up their children's ill behaviours!

 

Mind you, I am not comparing children to dogs or any animals of any kind.....I am simply saying that the techniques that are used for training of them can be applied to everyone! To be "calm and assertive", certainly works for me, on the job!!!!!

 

I have raised 3 very successful children and all I had to do was give them the "look" and there was civility in everyone's lives! :p

 

Yup! :)

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  • 5 weeks later...

Melika: Yes, we sailed the Pride and loved her....she's a wonderful ship with a great crew!

Our weather was a bit sketchy coming home into the fog and rain. But, it was beautiful in Mexico.

The Pride leaves from a beautiful port and that was fun, seeing the Queen Mary as we pulled out to sea.

I didn't much like standing on deck for the muster drill, I'm so used to Princess who puts you into a comfortable lounge for this.

And, the Pride has two sea days in the beginning of the cruise, instead of at the end....I'm not sure I liked that itinerary better!

The main lobby area is huge; lots of seating areas for just lazing around and meeting up with new friends or just people watching!

The lines for dinner were rediculous...we just waited until everyone got in and then walked in! Don't fall into the habit of waiting in line! You have an assigned table....what's the worry?

Do try the pizza and ceasar salad in the Mermaid's Grill! Yummy! And, the hamburgers/chicken breast and hot dogs with french fries out by the pool were fabulous!

And, of course, the 24 hour ice cream and yohurt are not to be missed (out by the opposite pool area!)

I don't remember the date of your cruise...but, you'll have a really great time! Don't miss the statue of David! As if you could!!!!!

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Petro: In answer to your question:

Brenda has been trained to assist with hearing/picking up items/pulling a wheel chair/turning on lights/opening & closing doors. Searching out people in bad situations and alerting to their whereabouts, etc., etc. She knows over 100 commands and has a phenomenal work ethic.

She is licensed to travel on boats/trains/planes, etc.

She can also "just be a dog!" She is extremely playful and is full of joy!

 

Since cruising has become so much fun for us, it's also become the same for her! It's great "down time" for all of us!

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We're back from our cruise (it was last week). I posted a review on the RCCL forum, but will post the SD- and disability-related info. here (in this thread as well as a new one so others will find the non-SD info.) so you don't have to try to find it over there.

 

 

TRIP:

 

Royal Caribbean's Radiance of the Seas

Western Caribbean

6-night, 7-day cruise to Key West, Cozumel, Grand Cayman, Jamaica, and one sea day

February 10 - 16, 2008

Solo cruiser, disabled with service dog, on group cruise (one of my best friends puts together these group cruises and I am friends with the musician we had, as well)

 

 

 

 

EMBARKATION:

 

We got to the large check-in room and I was sat down to wait for a while, during which time the cruiseline took care of whatever they needed to do with my service dog's health certificate. Eventually I was checked in and we took the elevator up to the second floor to get our photo taken (which I later bought) and enter the ship.

 

The ship tour I requested as accommodation (it was an option on the form, albeit for blind ppl but I explained my reasons for my disabilities for requesting it) was not offered to me at any time. Thankfully, I really only went between a few places (my room, the conference center, the potty box, the Windjammer, and the dining room) most of the time, so was able to get around with the lists by the elevator of what's on what floor ... with only one mishap that I recall (I swear the elevator said it was floor 10 when it opened on floor 8!).

 

 

 

 

SERVICE DOG POTTY BOX:

 

Finding the potty box when we first boarded on Sunday was a trick. We were told, "Deck 5 Forward," which is really not very specific or helpful. So, we walked up and down both sides of deck 5 from the mid-point onward. Nothing. I went down to Customer Relations on deck 4 and asked again. This time I was told it was actually on the helipad (on the front of the ship), which is on deck 6 but only accessed by stairs on deck 5. Good thing I'm not in a wheelchair, though I do have problems with stairs!

 

So, I went back up to deck 5 and climbed the stairs to the helipad. The only thing I found up there was a bunch of ppl and a LOT of wind. Two of those ppl were girls from our group, so I spent a few minutes with them as we watched us sailing along the FL coastline (did I mention I missed sail-away because I was looking for the box?) and took photos of each other in the crazy amount of wind (like a wind tunnel - it was hard to walk against). It was fun. :-)

 

But there was no potty box, so back on deck 5 I asked two crew members that I saw there about it. They didn't know about it, but knew which department was s'posed to take care of it. They made long phone calls down to whoever and a while later I finally learned that nobody had put the box out yet! Grr. I was already late for the first group meeting we were having, so after the guy told me they were going to put the box out and where they were going to put it, I went to the meeting. Lo and behold, after the meeting the box was there on deck 5 in the outside deck hallway that leads to the stairs for the helipad. (Mind you our cabin is deck 10 almost all the way aft [back of ship]! That's a LONG walk of practically the whole length of the ship, waiting for and taking an elevator in the middle.)

 

They placed it too far away from our room and she ended up having two accidents (both #2) on our way walking to the potty box. One was indoors in a hallway and the other was after we'd gotten outside on the deck, but before we reached the potty box. :-P She is not used to such a long walk to get out to potty, so her body must not have been able to handle that much stimulation. She's never had an accident since potty training years ago. I also did not appreciate the long walk (and, yes, the ship knew I had mobility problems).

 

 

 

 

OTHER ACCOMMODATIONS:

 

The medical-purposes fridge wasn't in my room when I first got in it, but I found the room steward and told him I'd requested it at least twice (the travel agent re-faxed my paperwork after I'd already done it a few months before she did it, plus I'd checked a couple weeks before the cruise if everything was set, incl. my need for the fridge). He said it was marked down that I requested a Sharps container (for used needles), which I did not as I do not need it, but that I wasn't marked for a fridge. *Sigh* But, it was in my room later that night, thankfully. (Funny thing is, at least two of the other rooms in our group had their built-in fridge/coolers marked as "Medical Use Only". The medical fridge I was brought didn't have that distinction, but it was definitely a medical fridge 'cause it was cold enough for my needs [once turned all the way up] while the cooler was not.)

 

 

 

 

ELEVATORS:

 

Thankfully, lots of ppl used the stairs so the wait for the elevators for those of us who need them was not bad. There was maybe one or two times I had to wait because several elevators were already full, but it wasn't anything like I've read on here that it could be like. Even on debarkation day I saw a family decide to take their large, rolling carry-ons and other bags down the stairs "because [they could]".

 

Also, I didn't have any problems with ppl trying to rush into the elevator ahead of me like I have heard can happen. Everybody was nice and made room even in the very full elevators.

 

It was nice that the ship did make loudspeaker announcements when arriving in ports to ask ppl to save the elevators for ppl who need them.

 

 

 

 

SEA MOTION/SEASICKNESS:

 

Nobody in our group got really seasick, but we could definitely feel the ship rocking all the time, especially at night. My dog seemed to do well with the sea's motion, although I did put MotionEaze on her ears every day (and I used it myself plus Bonine [which I don't recommend chewing even though it is chewable - it tastes nasty!] every day).

 

 

 

 

FOOD:

 

My need was taken care of (though I don't know if the waiter was informed of it beforehand even though he should have been), but the waiter I usually had (one table had a different waiter but I only sat there once) was FAR too pushy about trying to get me to order an appetizer (there aren't any that I can eat on the menu, although the last night I did order the slice of pizza off the kids' menu as an appetizer 'cause that's what I felt like having, LOL). The waiter and assistant waiter are lucky our gratuities are pre-paid. ;-)

 

For those with food allergies, do ask what is in each dish, as you might get a surprise! The brownies tend to have nuts, the chocolate cake on the Web site (room gift) has a raspberry or something layer in it, etc.

 

 

 

 

WATER:

 

The ship's water did not taste good, similar to tap water on land. (I never saw anything brown in it, though.) Thank goodness for bottled water!

 

 

 

 

KEY WEST, FLORIDA:

 

My new friend used a rented wheelchair in order to be able to walk the distances in ports, but the Key West sidewalks were not easy for her to push herself on, as they tilted towards the road for water runoff. (So, the chair kept trying to roll towards the road!)

 

 

 

 

MONTEGO BAY, JAMAICA:

 

I did get to take photos from my balcony when we docked at Montego Bay, Jamaica (fourth and final port). I was glad of that because the ship's purser had called that morning to say that the Jamaican officials said my dog couldn't go outside while docked there! Thankfully, I already had plans to be in the cabin that morning preparing something for the group event that afternoon.

 

I did have lunch indoors in the Windjammer. I tried the cheese pizza, which wasn't all that great. I had to use my hands to pick up my slices (I didn't touch any other slices or the tray, of course!) because there was parts of a meat pizza on the tongs, so I couldn't use them, and the man behind the counter didn't do anything when I mentioned the problem.

 

Most of the others in the group had good tours, although one of the tours got pretty scary when the bus got into a car accident and the bus driver and driver of the other car pulled guns on each other! On another tour, the tour guide gave a nice tour of a carefully planted marijuana crop while explaining the benefits of it and best ways to consume it (make tea, cook it in rice, sniff it, etc.), LOL.

 

 

 

 

OVERALL:

 

The cruise was fun, being with the group of ppl I was with and all, but I prefer land vacations for many reasons (incl. longer stays in each place so can do more things, bigger rooms/bathrooms, bigger choice of where to eat, etc.). Will I ever cruise again? Not unless it is a cruise with this group. I won't be doing next year's cruise, since it is just a three-day cruise to the Bahamas (I'll have been in the Bahamas for two weeks just before that cruise happens), although I'll prob'ly do the land portion of that trip (Disney). After that, we'll see - the price would certainly have to be really good for me to want to go again (like this cruise, $950 incl. the single supplement [not incl. port charges and gratuities] for a D1 balcony room).

 

 

 

 

--> Anything I forgot/left out, just ask about it! :-)

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Quam: I am so sickened by the "run around" that you had to go through in order to either locate or to "get to" your dogs potty box. That was ridiculous and terribly insensitive of RCCL!!!

They put you and your service dog through unecessary challenges to do a very simple task! And, they should "pay" for it!!!!!!!

I hope you spoke with the Hotel Manager and got a percentage taken off of your next cruise. Because, that's exactly what I did, onboard the Carnival Elation! (Of course, this should be done, the day it happens!)

ALL public entities must be cognizant of the needs of a service dog.

To have your partner be forced to have an accident because he/she could NOT get to their relief station, on time, is absolutely indignant!!!!!!

You're such a great gal and have such a wonderful attitude......I hope you do cruise again!

Be well and take care......

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Right now I'm more worried about the issue I had with the airline on my way home. They thought their policies could be over the law and that they were "doing me a favor" by "letting" me on the plane "only because" that was my fourth flight on that particular airline so far in 2008 but I "better be prepared" next time (what, for their foolishness and inability to follow the law?!). GRRR. I've only flown them these four times and hadn't had problems the other three times (two being international flights) on them, so won't be taking it to the DOT unless they don't respond to my query (which I need to do still - gotta go look up who/where to send it to). I have had to take it up with the DOT with one other airline, who did say they would re-train their employees after I requested they do that (they also sent vouchers for myself and the person who was flying with me, but that's not what I'm after and we haven't used them yet).

 

Also, at this point I'm pretty annoyed with TSA for not knowing their own rules. However, TSA is NOT an organization I'm going to argue with while in the airport, since it is all for safety's sake! :) I will be writing to them because their workers continually ignore or don't know the rules. (I did, however, tell the guy, "No," when he asked if I could take off my dog's collar and leash [funny how he didn't ask about the harness, which is full of more metal than the collars and leash combined, LOL!]. Another rule they should know and it is one I would argue every time.)

 

 

Oh, and did I mention previously that my dog's harness BROKE on the very first day of the cruise?! Arrgh! What timing!! :p I think the screw of the piece that broke (the adjuster on the breastplate that holds the right-side strap [from the saddle] on) is stripped, as a woman at the Customer Relations desk found a screwdriver and screwed the screw back in for me (very nice of her to help - I'd only asked to borrow a screwdriver, but maybe they don't want to lend those out...). It worked for a day and then broke again. Thankfully, that was the day I'd purchased my gorgeous necklace at the Key West Butterfly Conservatory and the box they packaged it in came with an elastic string around it. So, for the rest of the week (and still now, 'til I send it in to be fixed, prob'ly next week) my fix was that string tied several times around the strap and breastplate to hold the thing in place. I kept having to re-do it at least once per day (usually after she had been laying down for a while), but at least it made the harness usable! Also, later on in the cruise, we somehow lost one of the pins that holds the handle to the harness, so when I put the handle in the down position (taking the upright supporters off), the handle can come off the harness on that side. So, that will need replacing by the harness guy, too. (That's the second pin we've lost, so I already know those pins can't be found in the local hardware store here.) His fixing the harness is free, but I have to pay shipping both ways. Fun!

 

So, sometimes, whatever can happen, will! :p

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Quam: Unbelievable!!! I am so sorry that you've had such difficulties.

I once asked a gentleman, who was admiring Brenda and who was in a wheelchair why he didn't have a service dog.....you know what he said? "Because, a service dog would complicate his life too much!" I couldn't argue with him....he's right, they can.....but, they are so, so worth it!!!!!! And, what they give back makes any of the "crap" the public may give us, so worth it!!!!!

Also,as a CCI Grad. (Canine Companions for Independence)...I am covered by attorneys who are more than happy and willing to go to court with me and represent my side of any issues that may arise out of my service dog, any public entity and the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act)!

CCI gives us a piece of paper (in all languages; wallet size) that we can present to these entities, warning them about giving me any hassels about entrance to them and my dog!

By the way....CCI has dogs available, RIGHT NOW, for anyone interested in receiving a service dog! 1-800-572-BARK (2275).

Sorry, about the plug...but, they are an amazing organization and stand behind their graduates 100%.

Did you replace your necessary equipment? And, will your organization replace it all for you?

Quam, you have your work cut out for you.....I wish I could help!

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Quam: Unbelievable!!! I am so sorry that you've had such difficulties.

 

 

 

Thanks. It is just part of life - and the airline problems might be due in part to what I have been hearing of late of show dog folks illegally representing their dogs as service dogs just to avoid paying fees or putting their dogs in the cargo hold! I'm on an e-mail list for my dog's breed - it isn't for show dog owners, but some folks on there are involved with shows and one person posted that on a show dog list she is on several ppl have no problem admitting they illegally claim their pet show dog as a service dog when flying! Selfish, selfish people!!!

 

 

 

 

I once asked a gentleman, who was admiring Brenda and who was in a wheelchair why he didn't have a service dog.....you know what he said? "Because, a service dog would complicate his life too much!" I couldn't argue with him....he's right, they can.....but, they are so, so worth it!!!!!! And, what they give back makes any of the "crap" the public may give us, so worth it!!!!!

 

 

 

Yeah, an SD doesn't fit everybody's lifestyle. There are some things you have to give up when having an SD (i.e. when travelling alone, you can't do water parks/slides, certain rides at amusement parks, certain excursions like snorkeling or crazy-boat rides, etc.) and some changes you have to make to your life. But, for those who are willing and able to give things up and make some changes, it is definitely worth it!!

 

 

 

 

Also,as a CCI Grad. (Canine Companions for Independence)...I am covered by attorneys who are more than happy and willing to go to court with me and represent my side of any issues that may arise out of my service dog, any public entity and the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act)!

 

 

 

That's great that they have their own attorney and all to help graduates out! Hopefully you'll never have to go that route.

 

 

 

 

CCI gives us a piece of paper (in all languages; wallet size) that we can present to these entities, warning them about giving me any hassels about entrance to them and my dog!

 

 

 

That's neat that it is in different languages. I'm weary of showing any type of paper, but I do carry a business card that declares us a certified service dog team as well as a card that has a summary of the ADA laws and the ADA Hotline number on it. My dog's ID card also has a miniaturized copy of her certification certificate on the back of it, but I also don't show that for access (in the US, though I've yet to have to show it in other countries).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you replace your necessary equipment? And, will your organization replace it all for you?

 

 

 

I'll send it to be fixed prob'ly next week. I still need to e-mail the harness maker about it (I'm still trying to recover from the cruise, plus had to go out last night for a family event), but I would think he'd be able to do it next week. I don't know of anything important that I need to go to in the coming few weeks, so it is a good time to get the thing fixed. (In other words, thankfully it didn't break while I was on my Jan. trip, as I'd be concerned about getting it fixed before my early Feb. cruise!)

 

 

 

My trainer didn't get the harness for me - I got it myself. (I did not like the one she offered me, as the handle wasn't ergonomic so was uncomfortable and hurt my wrist to use. The one I have is ergonomic and works great. Well, did up 'til now, anyway, LOL! Guess these things happen with wear and tear.)

 

 

 

 

Quam, you have your work cut out for you.....I wish I could help!

 

 

 

Thanks, but it shouldn't be too big a deal to write two letters. I just have to get around to doing it - the sooner, the better, of course. I also have tons of photos to go through from not only my cruise (707 photos, still on my camera) but still my Jan. trip (off my camera but not sorted through yet) and another Jan. event (250 photos, still on my camera). The photos are the fun part, though!

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