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Average Age of Regent Passenger?


Iamboatman

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I was at the Cruise Shipping Conference in Miami this week and heard something that kind of shocked me, if true. It was claimed that the average age of a Regent passenger is 60. That seems kind of older than what I have experienced both personally and as a travel agent.

 

What do you see as the average age?

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Depends on which ship, date, length and where you are cruise to.

Last year on The Mariner March Caribbean cruise, I would guess that the average age was 50.

 

On our last Celebrity New England - Canada cruise it was about 65.

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I was at the Cruise Shipping Conference in Miami this week and heard something that kind of shocked me, if true. It was claimed that the average age of a Regent passenger is 60. That seems kind of older than what I have experienced both personally and as a travel agent.

 

What do you see as the average age?

We have sailed on Regent four times and I would say that's quite accurate by what we have seen, many people in their 70's and older many in their 60's and 50's and a few younger folks. We are 62&59 and could not afford Regent when we were younger.

I believe that is the case for many.

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I also believe that the average age is much higher on Regent than on lines such as Princess and Carnival.

Remember that most of the Regent Cruises are longer than one week, which makes it harder for those who work to take weeks at a time off.

I turned 50 on my first Regent Cruise (26 days) and was one of the younger onboard. I did not mind at all, and quite enjoyed visiting with the other passengers.

I am sure that the average age on the week-long Alaska cruises runs much younger.

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My wife and I wondered the same thing last year on the Mariner from Los Angeles to Fort Lauderdale. As we waited at the hotel for the ship to arrive, it was late, we thought the average age must be 80. Then the first few days on board it looked like 75. The strange thing was the longer we were on board the more younger passengers we saw. I would say by the end of the cruise the average age looked more like 50. The gauge we used was the passengers around the pool everyday at lunch. We saw the same people everyday for a few days, then a whole new cast for the next few days, then another group for a few days. Each set was younger and younger. Very strange.

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I started cruising on what is now Regent (Seven Seas and Radisson) in 1992. At that time, I was in my late 30s and considered the youngun on the ship. Times have changed and people are cruising earlier now. If you consider the longer, more expensive cruises, I would say the average age could be 60. I don't know if I'd gauge the age on the ship by those at the pool lunch, Paint Horse. Many people don't enjoy the sun with their food and eat at La Veranda, Portofino's or have room service.

 

Wendy, I love your comment about 60 being the new 40!! Will tell my SO who turns 60 next month.

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Regent does seem to have an older population than Princess, HAL and other mainstream cruise lines. However, from what I've read, the average age on Silversea and Seabourn is higher than Regent (perhaps due to the small ships and lack of facilities for younger people). It seemed that the PG has a younger average age. The bottom line for us is that it is the person that matters -- who really cares about age?

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Just came back from the Feb 25-March 7 cruise on Navigator (really great cruise - hope to post a review in a week or so) and agree that the average age was around 65. We arrived at 11:15 am and the room was filled with 65-75 year old travelers - more than a few in a wheelchairs. Just as we began to board we did see one young family with 2 children - 2 and 4 years old (but they also had a nanny). At dinner we did see at least 2-3 solo travelers with their individual nurses (their ages must have been late 80's). As the cruise progressed we did begin seeing younger individuals (40's). I did not mind the older crowd (my DW and I are both 54) as you met some really interesting people. Plus you did not have to worry about the "disco" staying open late:D Overall - I would say 80% of the travelers were in the 65-75 range, 10% less and 10% greater. Age was a nonfactor.

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If you think the age is old on Regent you should have seen the group we had on a Sitmar 2 week Alaskan cruise back in 1975 the average age of the passegers was Deceased:D :D :D :D

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I agree that, at least to me, age is a non-factor. I have met many really interesting, vibrant people on cruises who were well into their 80's. There was a couple on the PG who were celebrating their 65th wedding anniversary, and they were amazing. More energetic and interesting than some people 1/2 their age.

When we were in Costa Rica, we met a retired doctor who was 86, but he could run circles around most of us and was a most interesting conversationalist. I hope I am so lucky at that age. (I intend to be world cruising then, BTW, so just watch out!)

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I agree with Rachel. I've been on World Cruises where the average age is over 60 and been on the PG or shorter 1 one week cruisers where the ship was full of 30 to 40 year olds (even some late 20's) . Age is not an important factor IMO, some of the 60+ year olds are more full of fun and life than the 40 year old deadbeats. People young at heart, regardless of their age, often chose Regent over other cruise lines IMO.

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I am (at least for a few more days) in my 40's and have been cruising Regent since 2003. Possibly because I cruise with my family during the summer I haven't experienced as much of a 60+ crowd and my clients have never come back to me with comments as some of the above.

 

I am not familiar with the demographics on Silversea, Seabourn's demographics are actually younger. That is why the comment at the Convention surprised me. While I was sure what Frank Del Rio said was true, I wondered what the perceptions were of CC'ers.

 

So, it seems, other than the PG (and possibly the summers) it holds true pretty consistently; especially on longer/world cruises. Because demographics measure numbers, but psychographics measure feelings, I don't think the average age of the passengers would affect the type of cruise most would take because there is a definite vitality of Regent passengers. (Cultural interests and touring rather than belly flop contests and all!;) )

 

Thanks!:)

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Average age figures can be deceiving--the real question is whether you will find compatible travel companions. If you want to travel with contemporaries, age-wise, you just need to ask if there will be enough on board that you'll have a circle of potential friends. Again, if age is a predictor of that. I think that Iamboatman hits it on the head when he talks about maturity. Not maturity as a euphemism for age, but maturity in the true sense of the word. I have been on RSSC I think 9 times now, and I've always found a mix of early to bed types and people ready for the party. But even the latter group won't get obnoxiously drunk. And, anyone who suggests a hairy chest contest on an RSSC ship would probably be forced to walk the plank.

 

My first RSSC cruise was 11 years ago, when I was in my early 40s. The average age of my fellow pax definitely was higher, but I found myself hanging with a mix of ages. I became closest to a pair of sisters around my age and their mother (so much so, in fact, that one of the sisters and I will be sharing a cabin for the 71-night Discovery Cruise later this year). Among the others in the "gang" were a pair of octagenarian sisters who kept the rest of us embarassed as they were always the first to get to the top of any acropoli we encountered.

 

On my 50th birthday cruise, I hung with a group of other women ranging from late 40s to 90. And, believe me, the 90-year-old was always in the thick of things.

 

These days, I feel more in the center of the demographics, age-wise (the demos didn't get younger. allegedly, I got older). And I enjoy the company of the people I meet on board who are older, younger and contemporaries. The great thing about RSSC pax is that you don't get a lot of whiners and overgrown infants. Sure, there's always some. But they are SO outnumbered by terrific people.

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My first cruise on Regent was on Voyager in 2003 for our honeymoon, My wife and I were 31 and you could count on one hand how many couples were our age, but we had a great time. Since then we have cruised Regent 5 times ranging from Europe/Alaska/Carribean. We were usually always the youngest couple on the boat unless someone was traveling with there parents or something. I would have to agree that the age would usually be 50 plus, and with the skyrocketing fares for 2008 and 2009 I cannot see the number of younger people increasing since its usually the older travelers who can afford there skyrocketing fares.

 

FV

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This thread has gotten my DH and I discussing why our friends don't cruise. We are in our 30's and will be doing our 4th cruise next month - our second on RSSC. We take several vacations a year and prefer small luxury hotels, fine dining and fabulous locations. Our friends do the same. We all work hard, make good money, and play hard - taking long luxury vacations a couple of times a year. But none of them cruise and they are always surprised when we say we are doing another cruise. Last night I spoke with an acquaintance who is considering a cruise of the Med on a luxury line, but didn't know if they "were cruise people". On delving down into that statement, she said they liked to do their own thing and like adventure and didn't think she would like boarding a bus to check out a port. She was shocked when I told her about the excursions offered on most of our cruises and even more shocked when I told her when we cruised the Med we didn't do a single cruise line excursion and just hopped a train or bus to wherever we wanted to go and explored things on our own.

 

So why don't younger people cruise? It isn't because they can't afford it or don't have enough time off. At least not with all the people I know. It seems that people think cruises are either glorified booze cruises - floating motel 6's with a non-stop party going on or floating nursing homes. Not floating luxury resorts that you can step off of and enjoy as much adventure as your heart desires. I think there is an enormous untapped market here for the cruise lines. But I have no idea how to reach it. People worry about the age of their fellow cruisers - it is an often discussed topic on these boards. But I would never ask the average age of guests at the Hotel Danieli in Venice before being willing to book with them - would you? How odd that people don't worry about those things in luxury hotels - but do worry about them in luxury cruise lines. Perhaps all the hype about age keeps younger people away? They hear what the average age is on a line and think that stat must be provided for a reason and perhaps they'll be bored or feel out of place on that ship?

 

So - is keeping these statistics about the average age of passengers keeping the cruise lines from reaching younger wealthy cruisers? Is this thread the reason for the answer of what the average age is? I don't know the answer - just posing the question.

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"SuzCruise" made some interesting observations -- good food for thought. It does seem that only cruise lines are a bit obsessed with age. Just today, Mark Conway was quoted as stating that the average age on Regent was 58. . . . Since the cruise he is currently on is specifically to discuss Regent's new ship, it sounds as if they are taking the age of their passengers into consideration.

 

In terms of marketing, perhaps they need to be more like some of the mainstream cruise lines that show people who represent their target market (for instance, Carnival's television commercials show families).

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Totally not true, having been on Carnival, Princess and Rccs all within the past year I can tell you we saw many more young people and young familes then we did seniors so to say young people don't cruise is just not the case, as a matter of fact the last cruise we were on was on Carnival and there were 700 passegers 18 and under with their parents out off 2500. Now if you said they don't cruise much on lines like Regent I would agree. And I believe the main reason for that is cost, I know we could not afford approx. $1300 per day plus flying and the cost of touring when we were younger and cruising starting in our 20's. :D Your friends may not cruise but the growth in the main stream cruise industry speaks for itself.

Jerry

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Oh, so true. The age of cruisers is dropping...even on luxury lines like Seabourn, for example...which has a lower demographic than Regent (apparently).

 

There are a few things which skew the perceptions: Cost is one, but the other is time. Families and younger people generally cannot take off 2 or more weeks at a time. Another factor is that luxury ships generally cannot (or will not) accommodate 4 passengers in a suite, so there are logistics issues.

 

There should also be the obvious thing which makes the erroneous generalization obvious: The upscale cruise lines are building more ships...lots of them. Baby boomers are reaching retirement, but there needs to be more than older folks to fill those ships.

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Quite seriously, I don't care one iota about the ages of my fellow passengers, I always bring my own friends on board with me. I was recently on the Navigator (February), and it was a floating geriatric ward. You have never seen so many wheelchairs, scooters, walkers....but who cares?? I met some unbelievably cool people in their 70's, 80's and 90s (yes, 90's), and often hung out with them at the pool, pool bar etc. during the day. I'm in my 40's. I had a great time, and I hope they did as well.

 

However, don't the demographics decide the "average age". I've been taking Caribbean cruises on Regent every winter for the past several years. The ships used to sail out of San Juan. When they sailed out of San Juan, the "average age" was younger, much younger. Now, they sail out of Ft. Lauderdale. It's much easier for elderly people to board a ship in Ft. Lauderdale than it is to fly to San Juan for the cruise (they chose not to). The 80 and 90 year olds that I was chumming around with were all from the West Palm Beach or Ft. Lauderdale area....and they were delighted that once again they could sail in the winter. Hence, the age on board was much older, it's just easier for them to get on board.

 

Methinks the average age again drops on Med cruises....the flight to Roma or wherever is tough on the very elderly.

 

But what does it matter. Bring your own loved one, your own chums to hang out with if need be, care not about the age of those around you, and have a great cruise!

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I think that 40 is more like the new 29. So I guess 50 is the new 35.

 

$1300 a day for a Regent cruise? Most of them aren't *that* bad, at least not for a basic stateroom, although the Norwegian Fjords cruise is more like $1700. Our PG cruise next winter is less than $800, including port taxes, with air on top of course. We've done two Caribbean 7-days where the prices was 2-for-1, and they were pretty reasonable.

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I think that 40 is more like the new 29. So I guess 50 is the new 35.

 

$1300 a day for a Regent cruise? Most of them aren't *that* bad, at least not for a basic stateroom, although the Norwegian Fjords cruise is more like $1700. Our PG cruise next winter is less than $800, including port taxes, with air on top of course. We've done two Caribbean 7-days where the prices was 2-for-1, and they were pretty reasonable.

Wendy were going on a ten day British Isles cruise the discounted fare (25% off) is $8,350 per person in cat. F then you have about $350 each for insurance even with all credits and $1000 from my TA it's actually closer to $1400 per day, go look it up. And as I said before most young working couples just can't afford to cruise Regent.

Jerry:)

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I stand corrected - I meant young adults when I said young people. Under 18 is children (I would have jumped shipped if I wound up on board a ship with 700 kids!). I guess if I cared about the stats on average age of cruisers I should be looking to the highest age to assure there aren't kids on board. I wonder what the average age of cruisers on Disney is? Perhaps kids are what is bringing down the average age of cruisers on some other luxury lines?

 

And as I said before - many young adults can afford to cruise luxury lines, do spend big $$ on luxury vacations and do take off at least a 4 weeks from work a year but would never consider a cruise. If I were the cruise lines I would want to know why and work hard on fixing it. That is a huge untapped market for the luxury lines.

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