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Considering a new Sony.....advice?


pemlechat

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Hi! I am a newbie concerning photography, but would like to get a new camera that is a bit better than a P and S pocket camera. I am considering the soon to be released Sony H50. I would consider another brand, but I have Sony products at home that I think would be compatible. I am going on a Med cruise for the first time and really want a camera that will help me capture my trip without taking more than one or needing to know too much! :eek: Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

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Hi! I am a newbie concerning photography, but would like to get a new camera that is a bit better than a P and S pocket camera. I am considering the soon to be released Sony H50. I would consider another brand, but I have Sony products at home that I think would be compatible. I am going on a Med cruise for the first time and really want a camera that will help me capture my trip without taking more than one or needing to know too much! :eek: Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

 

 

Sony makes a lot of good consumer stuff and have a varied line of higher end cameras.

 

I'm not sure what specifically keep you tied to Sony products?

 

If you are looking at a superzoom I would take a hard look at the Canon S3 or S5 line that are very good and highly recommended superzooms, or the Olympus S550 ( though not rated nearly as high as the canon ) If you are looking for a compact camera with almost every bell and whistler including the ability to shoot raw but without the size of a DSLR the Canon G9 is a good candidate.

 

If you are after the superior image, faster response that simply don't exist in any P&S then you must move up to a DSLR. Nikon, Olympus have some very nice compact DSLR. Of course Sony, Canon and others have similar competitive DSLR.

 

If you are looking for compact yet full feature DSLR the new Olympus line with 3/4 sensor is the best compromise but the lens selection is still not as complete as Nikon or Canon.

 

I would say forget the tie to having the same brand as your other electronics. Expertise in home electronics doesn't mean its the best product for your buck when it comes to cameras, but if the Sony in the end fits your hands the best get it. These days you really are splitting hairs and unless you do a side by side run off the differences between the top tier is minimal at best. Go to a camera shop ( NOT Bestbuy) and try them out. Personally I'm biased against the memory stick and/or xD only cameras as you'll be limited in choice and price as there is less volume and competition versus equipment that uses SD or CF cards

 

You might want to read the take here:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/WB/WB.HTM

 

Or more indepth reviews here:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/

 

Happy shopping and enjoy taking pictures on your cruise :D

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I am a big fan of these super zoom cameras, I really like the substantial size of them, and now that they pretty much all have image stabilization they are even better.

 

I say find one, and mess around with it see how it feels in your hand, and if you like the way the menu is set up. I am not brand loyal with electronics, I usually try to choose the best that I can afford regardless of brand (although I am really impressed with my Canon S3 IS, and will look at Canon first next time)

 

I prefer the SD memory card, but if you have plenty of memory sticks from a previous sony, this could be a money saver since you wouldn't have to buy new memory (although SD is so cheap now, 2 gigs around $10, I got 2 higher end Sandisc ultra II for $29.00 recently).

 

Most digital cameras will produce outstanding results, and you should expect that from this sony, I doubt that you would be disappointed, it is more how the camera feels to you that makes the biggest difference.

 

MAC

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The H50 is an upgrade to the H9 and is quite a capable camera. As was said earlier, the Canon S-series are also very capable. The best advice was given earlier. Go to a local store and pick them up. Play with the settings and see how they feel.

 

Another point was made that because Sony makes other electronic products, it doesn't mean that they make a good camera. This is true. I wouldn't buy a Canon because I was happy with the copier at work or a Nikon because of the swell pocket binoculars I own. I would however consider that:

 

Sony has sold quality consumer digital cameras since 1982 and they use lenses from a stellar manufacturer (Zeiss) with a 150-year history. They also use Minolta technology that has an incredible history of innovation. (First commercial autofocus SLR in 1985, first digital camera with chip-based stabilization). I would also consider that they dominate the professional broadcast-quality video market and their cameras were good enough for George Lucas to use to shoot Star Wars Episodes II & III straight to digital. (BTW, Sony makes the image sensor in virtually all Canon cameras except for the DSLRs).

 

Canon leads the industry in digital camera sales, not because of slick marketing (which they do very well), but because they sell a quality product with a long history of reliability and excellent service backing them up. They also have a reputation for producing some of the finest lenses available.

 

Nikon has been a dominant force in cameras since they released their first F-series SLR in 1959. The legendary ruggedness made them a favorite of photojournalists everywhere. They too make some of the best lenses available. Their pro support and service has set the standard for other manufacturers to meet. (Not sure about consumer stuff...never owned one.)

 

Olympus was an icon of quality with their line of ultra-compact SLRs in the '70s and '80s. They also made a name for themselves with the tiny Stylus series of film cameras and evolved all of that into the digital market.

 

Panasonic (also a broadcast-video giant) has teamed with Leica (another photographic legend) to produce a very successful series of feature-packed, high performance digital cameras.

 

Fuji, Samsung, Kodak, Pentax, Ricoh...

 

My point would be that you shouldn't rule any of the major manufacturers out because of someone else's preference or bias. Pick one that you like and be comforted by the fact that unless you buy some unheard-of brand from an obscure island republic, you're likely to get a fine camera that will serve you well, whether it be Canon, Panasonic, Sony, Nikon, etc..

 

In case you are curious, I shoot with Minolta and Sony DSLRs but chose my Canon SD800IS pocket cam for how it felt and ease of use. That's also how I chose my current Sony DSLR. I came very close to switching to a Canon, but the build, control layout and superb lenses that Sony has released won me back.

 

Forgive my rant, but I just returned from looking for a Sony accessory at a local Best Buy and was told that if I ever wanted to take decent pictures, I'd better sell or throw away my Minolta/Sony crap and buy a Canon. This was from a "resident expert" who was unable to tell me what the letters in DSLR stood for or what the f/ numbers on a lens meant when asked.

 

*sigh*

 

Happy shooting, whatever you choose!

 

Dave

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.....

In case you are curious, I shoot with Minolta and Sony DSLRs but chose my Canon SD800IS pocket cam for how it felt and ease of use. That's also how I chose my current Sony DSLR. I came very close to switching to a Canon, but the build, control layout and superb lenses that Sony has released won me back.

 

 

Happy shooting, whatever you choose!

 

Dave

 

Since we are sharing

 

My old time film camera was SLR Olympus OM2, with 28, 50, and 70-150 zoom

 

My Digital ones: Canon G3 prosumer P&S, Casio EX-Z750 pocket P&S, and DSLR D40 16-85VR, 70-300VR

 

Soon to be ordered: D300 with 18-200 VR from costco :D

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Forgive my rant, but I just returned from looking for a Sony accessory at a local Best Buy and was told that if I ever wanted to take decent pictures, I'd better sell or throw away my Minolta/Sony crap and buy a Canon. This was from a "resident expert" who was unable to tell me what the letters in DSLR stood for or what the f/ numbers on a lens meant when asked.

 

Don't mean to hijack here, but...Dave...OMG!!! I'm completely speechless! Now, I know not to expect anyone at Best Buy or Circuit City to really know their stuff, or rely on them for guidance...but good grief! Do they not require ANY photo knowledge whatsoever??? Rhetorical question there, because the answer is obvious! I'd say that the manager should be aware, but my gut tells me he/she probably wouldn't really care. Like you, I only go to those places after thoroughly researching & knowing what I need/want...and only if they've got the best price. But can you imagine the "expert advice" the general public is relying on??? :eek:

 

I would love to be a fly on the wall if you were to return to see this "expert", toting some of your finest works (even your worst is probably far above average!)...and ask "is this the kind of crappy results you are referring to with Minolta/Sony gear???" LMAO! :p

 

-- Renée

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Wow! That's a lot to think about. I was thinking Sony because I have 2 Sony tvs that accept the memory stick which is nice for slide show viewing. I am not tied to Sony for sure. I will check out a small DSLR.......Nikon?? but I think I am really looking for a superzoom for the ease of use and smaller size...not to mention cost. I am looking for image quality and speed, I think :confused: I just am trying to figure out what is the best compromise for a novice that wants great results! :D I also would like to be able to take some decent night pictures. Any thoughts on the best quality of lense? Does one produce better images (sharper) than another? Sony Carl Zeiss vs Canon's?? Thanks so much, you guys are the greatest!

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Wow! That's a lot to think about. I was thinking Sony because I have 2 Sony tvs that accept the memory stick which is nice for slide show viewing. I am not tied to Sony for sure. I will check out a small DSLR.......Nikon?? but I think I am really looking for a superzoom for the ease of use and smaller size...not to mention cost. I am looking for image quality and speed, I think :confused: I just am trying to figure out what is the best compromise for a novice that wants great results! :D I also would like to be able to take some decent night pictures. Any thoughts on the best quality of lense? Does one produce better images (sharper) than another? Sony Carl Zeiss vs Canon's?? Thanks so much, you guys are the greatest!

 

 

Not a Sony ad, but an FYI:

 

Small DSLR: Sony has 2 new Live-view DSLRs that are tuned to play 16:9 HD output directly to Sony widescreen TVs. The A300 and A350 are meant to be P&S friendly allowing people used to composing and shooting with LCDs to move to the DSLR world without compromising autofocus like the current crop of Canons and Nikons. here's an article from USA Today of all places:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2008-04-09-tech-sony-slr-alpha_N.htm

 

Other than that, the current crop of superzooms is better than ever...from all makers. As I stated in my long-winded rant, it's damn hard to pick a bad camera from the top makers these days!

 

Dave

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But can you imagine the "expert advice" the general public is relying on??? :eek:

 

No need to imagine...I experienced it!:(

 

I would love to be a fly on the wall if you were to return to see this "expert", toting some of your finest works (even your worst is probably far above average!)...and ask "is this the kind of crappy results you are referring to with Minolta/Sony gear???" LMAO! :p

 

-- Renée

 

"If" indeed. Not likely. Did you ever hear this bit of advice?: "Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig!"

 

No pig lessons in my future!:D

 

Dave

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No need to imagine...I experienced it!:(

 

But, you are not the general public (as in, the people who don't know better than to listen to that moron)...still aggravating to deal with, though.

 

"If" indeed. Not likely. Did you ever hear this bit of advice?: "Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig!"

 

No pig lessons in my future!:D

 

Dave

 

AGREED!!! However, I'd sure love to see someone try to remove their foot from their mouth upon viewing your work! LMAO @ the pig analogy -- have heard it before and it is very fitting here! :D

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Thanks everyone! I'm going to play with some cameras! :p I think I am someone who wishes for DSLR quality in a pocket camera! hehehe :D On a side note, is it always harder to get a deal on a Sony? It seems there are many places discounting Canons, Nikons, and others, but Sony cameras are usually near or at retail. :( That may influence my decision as well.

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Thanks everyone! I'm going to play with some cameras! :p I think I am someone who wishes for DSLR quality in a pocket camera! hehehe :D On a side note, is it always harder to get a deal on a Sony? It seems there are many places discounting Canons, Nikons, and others, but Sony cameras are usually near or at retail. :( That may influence my decision as well.

 

The newest models are always held close to the intro price as long as possible. The S5IS has been out since last May and the price is starting to slip a little. Might be a good time to get one since the S6IS is probably due out any time ;). If you want to jump back a generation and buy the DSC-H9 model that the new Sony is replacing, it's a great camera and there are deals galore. This "one-step-back-from-the-edge" strategy has saved me thousands of dollars over the years with computer upgrades!

 

On the other hand, I bought my Sony A700 shortly after it first came out and paid full MSRP, but the $200-$300 I would have saved from then to now wouldn't buy a fraction of the enjoyment I've had using it!

 

Whatever camera you buy, use it and have fun!

 

Dave

 

Dave

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Okay.......went to a local camera shop. I think the DSLR's are too much camera for me and a bit pricey for what I would want. So, I think I am down to considering two. They tried to steer me toward the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ18 or the Canon S5 IS. Pros and cons? I like the extra zoom on the Panasonic, but some people really seem to prefer Canon. Thoughts??? :confused:

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Okay.......went to a local camera shop. I think the DSLR's are too much camera for me and a bit pricey for what I would want. So, I think I am down to considering two. They tried to steer me toward the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ18 or the Canon S5 IS. Pros and cons? I like the extra zoom on the Panasonic, but some people really seem to prefer Canon. Thoughts??? :confused:

 

Look here:

Panasonic- http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicfz18/

 

S5IS- http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canons5is/

 

The Canon has a slight edge on image quality, but the Panasonic's lens is superb. That would translate to better full zoom photos on the Panasonic and better wide to normal pics on the Canon. What will you shoot most? Don't you hate these choices?:D

 

Good luck!

 

Dave

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Look here:

Panasonic- http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicfz18/

 

S5IS- http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canons5is/

 

The Canon has a slight edge on image quality, but the Panasonic's lens is superb. That would translate to better full zoom photos on the Panasonic and better wide to normal pics on the Canon. What will you shoot most? Don't you hate these choices?:D

 

Good luck!

 

Dave

 

I use the same site Dave mentions above, and thought you might like a side-by-side so you can easily compare all the different aspects of each:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/compare_post.asp?method=sidebyside&cameras=canon_s5is%2Cpanasonic_dmcfz18&show=all

 

In addition to all of Dave's input (which has helped me greatly many times!), here are some more thoughts.

 

I would have loved to get the S5 IS, if only I could tolerate the shutter lag. I have the SD850 IS -- great pocket camera, but I'm used to film SLR and am fed up with shutter lag, so I just got the new Rebel XSi. If you are not up for DSLR (it's certainly not for everyone), these are probably your best middle ground (cost & ease of use, with quite good image quality).

 

When I was considering the S5 IS, one thing I absolutely LOVED about it is the swivel LCD (had one on an old digital and it is SOOOO useful when you don't have a direct view -- check it out, it's a great feature and I used that a lot on the old camera). One thing I hated (and it's something a lot of people might actually prefer) is that it uses AA batteries. Yes, they are easy to find and that is helpful in a pinch, but I'd rather have a lithium ion -- just my preference. The DMC-FZ18 uses lithium ion.

 

A few other nice things about the DMC-FZ18 are the internal memory (not a lot at 27MB, but it's nice), can shoot in RAW (for those who care), and starts at a wider angle (28mm vs. S5 IS @ 36mm). The wider angle is very nice to have (a real factor to consider, while internal memory and RAW are probably irrelevant to most people).

 

For the S5 IS, a couple other nice things are the flash hot-shoe (very useful feature) and orientation sensor (not critical, but I happen to like having it).

 

It is never an easy decision, as the "perfect" camera for any one person usually doesn't exist. You'll have to weigh which features are most important, and your overall impression & comfort with each camera.

 

Oh, and you should consider turning off the digital zoom, which is basically cropping. Using that will degrade image quality, and either of these cameras has substantial optical zoom (no need for digital -- it's a marketing thing). You can do a test & see the effect the digital zoom has on image quality. Turning it off ensures that you don't accidentally enter the digital zoom range.

 

Good luck in choosing :)

-- Renée

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It is never an easy decision, as the "perfect" camera for any one person usually doesn't exist. You'll have to weigh which features are most important, and your overall impression & comfort with each camera.

 

I have said many times in posts that the perfect camera is usually two (or three!) cameras!:D

 

Oh, and you should consider turning off the digital zoom, which is basically cropping. Using that will degrade image quality, and either of these cameras has substantial optical zoom (no need for digital -- it's a marketing thing). You can do a test & see the effect the digital zoom has on image quality. Turning it off ensures that you don't accidentally enter the digital zoom range.

 

Good luck in choosing :)

-- Renée

 

Awesome point! I stopped using digital zoom so long ago that I forget to tell people to turn it off!

 

Thanks Renée! (On behalf of all that read these posts!)

 

Dave

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I have said many times in posts that the perfect camera is usually two (or three!) cameras!:D

 

A sad & frustrating, but very true, fact! Although, I don't mind having 2 -- a P&S for times when I don't want to lug a DSLR (or worry about damage/theft). Although, even 2 doesn't cover every possible want/need -- as you duly point out! ;)

(If you count my original digital and my Maxxum 7000i, I have 4 -- ugh! Dave, I know you have me beat by a long shot, though!)

 

Thanks everyone. I'm leaning toward the Panasonic...........but my head hurts now and I must go to bed! :eek:

 

I know the "head hurts" feeling all too well. However, if you've done enough homework that you've gotten to that point, you are probably going to end up with a camera well suited to your needs (until you get the itch to upgrade!). Hope you feel better after you've had some rest. :)

 

-- Renée

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I have said many times in posts that the perfect camera is usually two (or three!) cameras!:D

 

 

Dave

 

My take of the the perfect travel combo:

 

A slim P&S > 6 Meg that has optical or sensor vibration reduction and 640x480 30 FPS video. This you can carry this everywhere in your pocket. That will be good enough for any shot with even some 50% crop printed to 4x6.

 

Then for the serious higher quality shooting where pictures are planned, ANY DSLR with effective 35mm focal length wide-mid tele 28mm-85mm or so. If you really want to cover everything then the 18-200mm super zoom by Sigma is available for a one lens do it all. And if you happen to have Nikon then you can get the super 18-200 Nikon. Or you go with two lens wide-mid tele and a 55-200 or 70-300 ( stabilized is best, but not a must ).

 

These days should be heaven for those that remember what photography was like only 10 years ago even. Digital/semiconductor technology has brought great things and expect another 10 wonderful years of improvement!

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I have said many times in posts that the perfect camera is usually two (or three!) cameras!:D

 

Dave

 

It'll be 3 for me

 

Casio ex750

D40 18-200 VR on camera

D300 16-85 VR on camera

70-300VR for the long chots

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I would have loved to get the S5 IS, if only I could tolerate the shutter lag. I have the SD850 IS -- great pocket camera, but I'm used to film SLR and am fed up with shutter lag, so I just got the new Rebel XSi. If you are not up for DSLR (it's certainly not for everyone), these are probably your best middle ground (cost & ease of use, with quite good image quality).

 

Congratulations on the Rebel Xsi. I have been reading and watching this one for the past couple of months now. Still trying to decide if it is the way for me to go. Have you had a chance to try it out yet? What do you think of it? Recommend?

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Congratulations on the Rebel Xsi. I have been reading and watching this one for the past couple of months now. Still trying to decide if it is the way for me to go. Have you had a chance to try it out yet? What do you think of it? Recommend?

 

If you don't have any legacy lenses from a film DSLR, you may want to follow Renée's path and buy a system that gives you ready access to a friend or co-worker who has the same system and a good knowledge of it.

 

Lacking that, consider the new Sony A350. It has a tilting LCD to go with the live-vue and a new system that allows the camera to focus as fast using live-vue as when using the optical viewfinder (most brand's live-vue focusing is very slow). It also has the advantage of in-body stabilization which makes any lens you attach to it stabilized (including the 35 million Minolta lenses produced since 1985). Sony is #2 in total camera sales and even though they only had 2 DSLR models in 2007, the are #3 in that fast-growing market. They have put a lot of bang-for-the-buck in their three recent releases.

 

BTW, I'm not a Sony salesman!:D I have shot Minolta for 30+ years and when Sony took over the technology in 2006, they had to sell me all over again before I bought a new Sony. Additionally, I just had an experience with a brain-dead Best Buy "expert" who was apparently unaware that anyone but Canon and Nikon made DSLRs. That left me a little evangelical about good ol' number three!

 

Whatever you choose, be aware that a DSLR is NOT a point and shoot and though they are perfectly acceptable set on "Auto", you will only realize your investment and expand your creativity by taking some time and expending some effort learning about the nuts and bolts of photography.

 

Good luck!

 

Dave

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If you don't have any legacy lenses from a film DSLR, you may want to follow Renée's path and buy a system that gives you ready access to a friend or co-worker who has the same system and a good knowledge of it.

 

Lacking that, consider the new Sony A350. It has a tilting LCD to go with the live-vue and a new system that allows the camera to focus as fast using live-vue as when using the optical viewfinder (most brand's live-vue focusing is very slow). It also has the advantage of in-body stabilization which makes any lens you attach to it stabilized (including the 35 million Minolta lenses produced since 1985). Sony is #2 in total camera sales and even though they only had 2 DSLR models in 2007, the are #3 in that fast-growing market. They have put a lot of bang-for-the-buck in their three recent releases.

 

BTW, I'm not a Sony salesman!:D I have shot Minolta for 30+ years and when Sony took over the technology in 2006, they had to sell me all over again before I bought a new Sony. Additionally, I just had an experience with a brain-dead Best Buy "expert" who was apparently unaware that anyone but Canon and Nikon made DSLRs. That left me a little evangelical about good ol' number three!

 

Whatever you choose, be aware that a DSLR is NOT a point and shoot and though they are perfectly acceptable set on "Auto", you will only realize your investment and expand your creativity by taking some time and expending some effort learning about the nuts and bolts of photography.

 

Good luck!

 

Dave

 

Thank you. I will look into it. I have a very old Pentax SLR, not digital that I used for years. Had kids, gave up the lenses and film for small, compact and ease. Have been using a Canon S45 p&s for a few years now. You know, slip in pocket or bag and off you go. Now the dslrs are so light, I'm thinking of one of the in betweens. I like my little Canon so I thought the Xsi seemed to have the dslr with a lot of the ease of the p&s. Much like the other poster, I'm used to their menu and set up. I like the flash card and the battery pack. Now that they have live view, stabilization and the dust free lense, not to mention a bit better in price than a lot of the others, I figured I may give it a try. Still thinking about it.

I have, as previously, done some research on dpreview. I will research (and check up here. I've been watching your advise and posts on several threads for a while now :o ), and then buy at either our local camera store/small business owner that offers true advise. We do have the infamous Best Buy guys here too. My other actually preferred option is Costco. Believe it or not. If you don't have to have the sales person's expertise, the price and warranty can't be beat. I'm waiting for them to get the Xsi in to see what they'll offer.

I will check out the Sony. Thanks for the advise. It really is appreciated. Have you tried out the Canon Xsi? If so, what did you think?

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Thank you. I will look into it. I have a very old Pentax SLR, not digital that I used for years. Had kids, gave up the lenses and film for small, compact and ease. Have been using a Canon S45 p&s for a few years now. You know, slip in pocket or bag and off you go. Now the dslrs are so light, I'm thinking of one of the in betweens. I like my little Canon so I thought the Xsi seemed to have the dslr with a lot of the ease of the p&s. Much like the other poster, I'm used to their menu and set up. I like the flash card and the battery pack. Now that they have live view, stabilization and the dust free lense, not to mention a bit better in price than a lot of the others, I figured I may give it a try. Still thinking about it.

I have, as previously, done some research on dpreview. I will research (and check up here. I've been watching your advise and posts on several threads for a while now :o ), and then buy at either our local camera store/small business owner that offers true advise.

 

They will tell you to get a Canon or Nikon because of the vast system of accessories and lenses that are available. If you are planning on becoming a working pro, this might be important. If not, you may never need that $11,000 600mm f/4 IS lens that the vastness covers. You will also notice that if the guy behind the counter shoots Nikon, your choice of the Rebel will seem foolish. If he shoots Canon and you ask to look at a D60, he will frown. Visit more than one shop. Canon vs. Nikon vs. all others approaches the religious fervor of Windows vs. Mac. :D

 

We do have the infamous Best Buy guys here too. My other actually preferred option is Costco. Believe it or not. If you don't have to have the sales person's expertise, the price and warranty can't be beat. I'm waiting for them to get the Xsi in to see what they'll offer.

I will check out the Sony. Thanks for the advise. It really is appreciated. Have you tried out the Canon Xsi? If so, what did you think?

 

I worked with one a few weekends ago to see if live view was as nice as it was on my Minolta A2 digicam. It wasn't. Like I said, I grew up on Minolta's and they were always lauded for the layout of their controls and ease of use...for good reason (Sony has , to my delight, maintained that). I found the Canon controls fiddly and the menus learnable but a lot more difficult to access functions quickly than the Sony quick navigation on my A700 (or the A350 which I played with too).

 

Example - turn on live view:

 

Canon

- Set shooting mode to Creative Zone

- Press "Menu" button and navigate to the fifth tab

- navigate down six lines to "Live view functions settings"

- press "Set" button

- Select "Live view shoot"

- press "Set" button

- Choose "Enable"

- press "Set" button

- press "Menu" button to exit

 

Sony:

- Move the "Live view" switch to "Live view".

 

Turns out that (other than for still close-ups) I'm not much of a fan of live view. The Sony focuses with live view just as fast as with the viewfinder vs. nearly a second with the Xsi, but there is still no substitute for a viewfinder in an SLR.

 

I'm a big fan of simplicity where it's needed and I wouldn't have stuck with Sony if they had turned their DSLRs into PlayStations with lenses. Sony, Nikon, Canon, Pentax, Olympus, Panasonic...they all make good stuff. As I've said before, you'd be hard pressed to buy a bad camera from any of them!

 

FYI: I have a Canon SD800IS pocket cam that I will probably keep until things start falling off of it. I spent a lot of time choosing it and it won out over the other brands, including Sony. The Canon DSLR menus aren't really related to the P&S menus other than superficially.

 

Dave

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