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How long does a hurricane take to brew?

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I'm sailing in 2 weeks. If the Atlantic ocean looks clear right now, does that mean we probably won't have stormy weather? Doesn't it take a while for a storm to start and grow and makes its way to the Caribbean?

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Storms can be very unpredictable. Some give quite a bit of notice, others none at all! Several years ago we were getting pelted one after another just 7 days apart! There are no guarantees. Another reason to get to your embarkation port a day or 2 early.

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There is a great website that will help you understand hurricanes; how they form, historical data, etc....

 

Hurricane 101

 

http://html.orlandoweather.com/sh/idi/weather/hurricanes/index.html

 

We live in Wellington, FL. Fay has been a rainy day but nothing more. There was a tornado last night that hit a horse clinic but that was the only real problems. Never lost power!!!! YEAH

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I'm sailing in 2 weeks. If the Atlantic ocean looks clear right now, does that mean we probably won't have stormy weather? Doesn't it take a while for a storm to start and grow and makes its way to the Caribbean?

 

I have been watching the last few Tropical Depressions/Storms. It takes about 10-14 days from the time it leaves the coast of Africa to arrive near the east coast.

 

We are leaving on a cruise Saturday from New York to Puerto Rico. There is a Tropical Depression out in the mid-Atlantic right now. I am figuring on the rain to be in PR on Monday morning, but that can change, as the weather normally moves around 250-300 miles per day (10-15 MPH). (We are scheduled to be in PR on Tuesday, so watching this is important to me). From there you would add 2 1/2 to 4 days for it to get to Southern Florida (900 miles).

 

This NOAA web site has good information and helps you see and track what's out there.

 

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/gtwo_atl.shtml

 

You might want to start looking now and then see how it goes. This way you might be able to see if your cruise would probably have its itinerary changed. Good Luck and smooth sailing!

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I'm sailing in 2 weeks. If the Atlantic ocean looks clear right now, does that mean we probably won't have stormy weather? Doesn't it take a while for a storm to start and grow and makes its way to the Caribbean?

 

There is no formula. Some build a long time, coming from off the coast of West Africa. Others (like the current Hanna) can become a tropical depression very quickly.

 

No way to tell. Ya just takes yer chances, as the saying goes.

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I have been watching the last few Tropical Depressions/Storms. It takes about 10-14 days from the time it leaves the coast of Africa to arrive near the east coast.

 

We are leaving on a cruise Saturday from New York to Puerto Rico. There is a Tropical Depression out in the mid-Atlantic right now. I am figuring on the rain to be in PR on Monday morning, but that can change, as the weather normally moves around 250-300 miles per day (10-15 MPH). (We are scheduled to be in PR on Tuesday, so watching this is important to me). From there you would add 2 1/2 to 4 days for it to get to Southern Florida (900 miles).

 

This NOAA web site has good information and helps you see and track what's out there.

 

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/gtwo_atl.shtml

 

You might want to start looking now and then see how it goes. This way you might be able to see if your cruise would probably have its itinerary changed. Good Luck and smooth sailing!

 

 

Not all of the storms come off of Africa, especially later in the hurricane season. Stuff can pop up anywhere and at any time...

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I'm sailing in 2 weeks. If the Atlantic ocean looks clear right now, does that mean we probably won't have stormy weather? Doesn't it take a while for a storm to start and grow and makes its way to the Caribbean?

 

I guess the OP has the answer now, since the Atlantic was clear a week ago, but now we have a potential of four storms brewing, with one being a Cat 5 Hurricane and the other could develop quckly.

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There are just too many factors to try to predict how fast they can form. Wilma (or was it Rita) in 2005 was only a lowly TS as it passed Key West and the VERY NEXT DAY, it was a CAT 5 (the fastest on record, I believe).

 

So, in a week and a half you can start looking to the cape verde islands for something spinning off or into the Caribbean Sea for something spooling up. That is the soonest that you could start seeing the beginnings of what could be the next Tropical System to affect the Caribbean (Eastern or Western...)

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Sometimes they pop up seemingly out of nowhere, and sometimes they track across the Atlantic for two weeks or more. There are too many variables to say anythign more.

 

Just watch the weather.

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