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Question about my room on the Dawn


Jacy613

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We are booked into a BA balcony cabin on deck 10. The luggage tags indicate this as a FWD.

Is this cabin going to have more noticeable movement than maybe a mid or aft? We booked a long time ago, and was given this room before we knew anything. I really don't want to change, unless I am offered an upsell (not likely) but I don't want to be prone to motion sickness problems, either. I plan on having Bonine with me.

 

Does a balcony room have any additional "perks" attached to it other than the balcony itself???

Just wondering, and very grateful for your answers!

Jacy

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We are booked into a BA balcony cabin on deck 10. The luggage tags indicate this as a FWD.

Is this cabin going to have more noticeable movement than maybe a mid or aft? We booked a long time ago, and was given this room before we knew anything. I really don't want to change, unless I am offered an upsell (not likely) but I don't want to be prone to motion sickness problems, either. I plan on having Bonine with me.

 

Does a balcony room have any additional "perks" attached to it other than the balcony itself???

Just wondering, and very grateful for your answers!

Jacy

 

You might feel more motion the more forward you are on the ship. Just wear your patches and you should be fine.

 

Sorry, do not know about the perks of a balcony. Have a wonderful cruise.

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Luggage tag that says Fwd does not mean your cabin is forward. It may well be midship. Look at the deck plan. Fwd or aft on the tags just indicate which location the bags are loaded on the ship. The is no midship hatch to load bags.

 

Stick with the Bonine and avoid the patch that can make you feel worse then being seasick

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Balconies will have a separate line for check in, although it may be combined with Latitudes or Mini-Suites etc. It may not be the shortest line!!

 

You will have bathrobes (lower categories do not have bathrobes).

 

Some ships have balcony and mini-suite dining in the OTHER dining room from the one that is open to all passengers at breakfast and/or lunch (suites will have theirs in Cagneys, a specialty restaurant). This takes some of the chaos out of the buffet area. But if you want to go to the buffet, feel free to do so. It may be faster.

 

Balcony passengers can make specialty restaurant reservations 48 hours ahead. Suites can get them any time, and others only 24 hours ahead, I think.

 

Can you find your cabin on the deck plan? If not, tell us the number and we'll tell you if it is forward enough to give you the "dip" for motion sickness. It is only the cabins way forward that will be a problem, if there are rough seas.

 

For stability, the lower the deck, the more midship is the rule.

 

Do you know if you are bothered by motion sickness, as in, do you get sick in a car? You may not experience anything if you don't.

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We were in a forward (very forward) deck 10 cabin. I think it was 10508.

We rode through a storm our first day and a half and I didn't sleep. I didn't get sick but I didn't sleep.

The ship went up , slammed down , side to side. I let out alot of weird sighs... If I remember correctly it was our first 30 hours. I think it was 20 foot swells. Some people said it was more, some less. I knew we were rocking and rolling..

 

I'd go midship next time.

 

This was last october on the Dawn. NYC to Bermuda.

It certainly DIDN"T ruin our vacation...

 

We are booked into a BA balcony cabin on deck 10. The luggage tags indicate this as a FWD.

Is this cabin going to have more noticeable movement than maybe a mid or aft? We booked a long time ago, and was given this room before we knew anything. I really don't want to change, unless I am offered an upsell (not likely) but I don't want to be prone to motion sickness problems, either. I plan on having Bonine with me.

 

Does a balcony room have any additional "perks" attached to it other than the balcony itself???

Just wondering, and very grateful for your answers!

Jacy

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Are the same as a mini suite. 48 hours for specialty restaurant reservations. That is it! The so called fruit bassket is a cereal bowl with fruit for each person in stateroom from apples, oranges, bananas & pears.

 

If you are Silver + Latitudes then you get treats & other perks.

 

We were in mini's on Dawn & Jewel & ate in the dining room for breakfast, liunch & dinner, with no knowledge of anywhere else to go to if you do not want to pay

 

Balconies will have a separate line for check in, although it may be combined with Latitudes or Mini-Suites etc. It may not be the shortest line!!

 

You will have bathrobes (lower categories do not have bathrobes).

 

Some ships have balcony and mini-suite dining in the OTHER dining room from the one that is open to all passengers at breakfast and/or lunch (suites will have theirs in Cagneys, a specialty restaurant). This takes some of the chaos out of the buffet area. But if you want to go to the buffet, feel free to do so. It may be faster.

 

Balcony passengers can make specialty restaurant reservations 48 hours ahead. Suites can get them any time, and others only 24 hours ahead, I think.

 

Can you find your cabin on the deck plan? If not, tell us the number and we'll tell you if it is forward enough to give you the "dip" for motion sickness. It is only the cabins way forward that will be a problem, if there are rough seas.

 

For stability, the lower the deck, the more midship is the rule.

 

Do you know if you are bothered by motion sickness, as in, do you get sick in a car? You may not experience anything if you don't.

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Jacy

 

We just returned from our first cruise yesterday. We were in 10066 fwd on the Dawn. Previously the only ship I had been on was from Miami to the Bahamas a few years ago and was quite seasick, so I was worried I would be again and took many things with me to hopefully combat it this time. To my surprise I was almost perfectly fine. Did not require the wrist bands or the patch I had taken with me, however one evening I did feel a little queasy everywhere I was on the ship, and chose to take a “gravol” (Canadian) which I believe the U.S. equivalent is Dramamine. That evening we had gale force winds (force 8) and waves 7.5’-12’.

 

We loved our balcony room and would definitely recommend it to anyone, as I said this was our first cruise and I have nothing to compare it to.

 

We did not have a separate line to check in however yes we did have bathrobes, and could make reservations 48 hours in advance, although we ate at Cagneys 2 nights (one 24 hrs in advance, 1 5 hrs in advance). We had no problem getting in as we chose to eat around 5:30/5:45.

 

Have fun.

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Thanks so much for the encouraging words! Our cabin is #10576. Is this considered to be forward?

I tend to get a bit seasick (mostly it is motion sickness) but that is usually if I am looking directly at the water. I don't intend to do THAT, trust me! I know enough to keep my eyes on the horizon now.

 

I am just worried about being able to sleep if it is rough waters. I am putting my trust in the Bonine and I will have wrist bands as a back up, as well as the patch, but I have never used it before, so I am going to use them as a last resort.

 

Thanks again!

Jacy

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Jacy: do put your trust in Bonine. I always chew one as soon as I am on the ship and it has never failed me. I might take another one the next day and then I am fine for the trip. Last year on the Dawn we were on Deck 8 right under the bridge. We didn't feel any more motion than midship or aft. I know "they say" you do, but after 24 cruises I see no difference at all. I got seasick on two different cruises years ago. I hadn't taken anything and it hit like a ton of bricks. There is really no warning and then it is too late for dramamine or Bonine to get you back. Better to take it before you sail and hope for calm seas.

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As for Bonine and the like... I recommend taking the standard dose with breakfast before you board the ship. At the dock, you won't notice any movement, but soon after leaving the harbor, you will.

 

Often, the roughest nights are the first and the last (gulf stream issues), so best to be prepared before boarding. Also, there is always so much excitement and activity, I would probably forget to take the pill after boarding.

 

You will typically reduce your pre-seasick feeling by concentrating on the horizon vs the waves.

 

We always travel with a box of ginger snap cookies (with real ginger, not flavoring). These can help eas a queesy stomach, and if you don't need them, they are good to eat. If left over, try them with a mild cheese -- sounds yucky, but really good.

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Thanks so much for the encouraging words! Our cabin is #10576. Is this considered to be forward?

I tend to get a bit seasick (mostly it is motion sickness) but that is usually if I am looking directly at the water. I don't intend to do THAT, trust me! I know enough to keep my eyes on the horizon now.

 

I am just worried about being able to sleep if it is rough waters. I am putting my trust in the Bonine and I will have wrist bands as a back up, as well as the patch, but I have never used it before, so I am going to use them as a last resort.

 

Thanks again!

Jacy

 

No I would not consider that a forward cabin. It is halfway between the forward and midship elevators. Those cabins forward of the forward elevators are the ones you might feel more motion in.

The Dawn had the least motion of any of the ships I have been on. I have stayed well forward of you a couple of times BA10052 and AF11502 the second most forward AF.

I would try the patch on land before I even carried it onboard. They were off the market for a number of years because of the side effects. Many people react very badly to them.

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Since you are sailing on the Dawn in a Balcony you will have another breakfast option.

 

Venetion (MDR) and the Buffet are open to all passengers

Cagneys is open for Suites and Villas

 

Aqua is open for Balcony and Mini-suites for breakfast. You should have a card or something in your room letting you know this.

 

I personally have never had that option (they started it after my sailing last April), but those have posted about it have enjoyed.

 

Have a great cruise. The Dawn is my personal favorite and is beautiful.

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Thanks so much for the encouraging words! Our cabin is #10576. Is this considered to be forward?

I tend to get a bit seasick (mostly it is motion sickness) but that is usually if I am looking directly at the water. I don't intend to do THAT, trust me! I know enough to keep my eyes on the horizon now.

 

I am just worried about being able to sleep if it is rough waters. I am putting my trust in the Bonine and I will have wrist bands as a back up, as well as the patch, but I have never used it before, so I am going to use them as a last resort.

 

Thanks again!

Jacy

 

Looks like your stateroom is in the middle third of the ship. Click on the link below and move the orange bar to highlight deck 10. You will see where your stateroom is.

 

http://www.ncl.com/nclweb/fleet/deckplan.html?shipCode=DAWN

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I stayed in 10532 almost directly accross from the forward elevators. I loved the room and was even trying to get the identical room for my next cruise. I felt nothing, just a word to the wise preventative medicine is where it is at with a cruise. If you allow yourself to get seasick you will have a tough time combating it once it happens. I witnessed others who were not prepared go through it. Where the bands even if you feel like a turkey, take a pill if you need it...just stay ahead of the curve and you will be fine. I went out in a beautiful formal dress with the little bands on...they looked like sweatbands but everone is in the same "boat" so to speak and it is not as much about fashion as it is about enjoyment. Better safe than sorry.

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