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Need to know about going on Alaskan Cruise with Criminal Record


wisconsingal

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HI: I am thinking about planning an Alaskan cruise with my family. One of my family members has a criminal record. I know that most, if not all, of Alaskan cruises include at least one port call to a city in Canada. People with criminal records are not allowed entry to Canada. Therefore, it is very critical to know whether this family member can still go on the cruise and just remain on the ship when it docks at the Canadian port. The plan would be to go on a cruise that begins and ends either in Seattle or Anchorage (sp?).

 

I would prefer an answer from people who have firm knowledge on this issue. I had read another message thread (don't think it was on this site though) that stated that the person has to be cleared to enter Canada to even be allowed to go on the cruise, and that it isn't a matter of just staying on the ship when it is docked in Canada.

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I would prefer an answer from people who have firm knowledge on this issue.

 

You shouldn't base this decision on the answers you get anonymously on line. This issue should be taken up with, at the least, a travel agent and possibly a lawyer. Just my opinion. :)

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Get an answer from someone with legal knowledge.:o

We were in the airport (Vancouver, BC) when two guys from Australia were pulled aside (one, actually, the other was with him). The one had had a felony conviction years ago but he was not allowed into CA so the other one didn't want to go on the cruise without him..........$ lost there, plus they had to get a fast flight out.:(

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I know there is some type of flight available that one never actually "enters" Canada... it goes straight from the airport to some type of "bonded bus" or something like that and then straight to the ship... you might check on that possibility with your travel agent

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HI: I am thinking about planning an Alaskan cruise with my family. One of my family members has a criminal record. I know that most, if not all, of Alaskan cruises include at least one port call to a city in Canada. People with criminal records are not allowed entry to Canada. Therefore, it is very critical to know whether this family member can still go on the cruise and just remain on the ship when it docks at the Canadian port. The plan would be to go on a cruise that begins and ends either in Seattle or Anchorage (sp?).

 

I would prefer an answer from people who have firm knowledge on this issue. I had read another message thread (don't think it was on this site though) that stated that the person has to be cleared to enter Canada to even be allowed to go on the cruise, and that it isn't a matter of just staying on the ship when it is docked in Canada.

 

This is a legal matter. Call the closest Canadian Embassy/Consulate and get the legal interpretation from them. Some anonymous replies here are useless.

 

Here's a link.....make the call. It's better to know the law than be denied boarding and lose all that money.

 

http://canadaonline.about.com/od/travel/a/usembassy.htm

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  • 1 year later...

Hi I haven't accessed this site in a while but I came back to check the replies. Maybe I should clarify that we will not be taking a flight that leaves or departs from Canada because we would avoid entering Canada. We likely will be taking a cruise that is round trip from Seattle. But there are not any Alaskan cruises that do not make a port call to a Canadian port because this is some kind of international law since the cruise ship will not be American owned.

 

So I am concerned that there will be Canadian border agents at the airport or at the ship boarding site in Seattle checking documentation before we board the ship and my concern is that we could be prevented from boarding the ship when we get there in Seattle. Is this a possibility or not? Even though we are leaving from and returning to an American port, are there Canadian agents monitoring the people that board the ships since the ship will be docking at a Canadian port?

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If the family member has to stay on the ship when in Canada, you could not take a cruise from Anchorage. Those cruises end in Vancouver. You would have to tak eone roundtrip Seattle or San Francisco. Or possibly do a b2b from Anchorage.

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Hi I haven't accessed this site in a while but I came back to check the replies.

No kidding - you asked this in March 2009!

 

There are no "Canadian Boarder Agents" at the airport in Seattle checking to see where people who are arriving in Seattle are going. If you think about it, that makes no sense.

 

You were already given the correct answer. Don't check this with posters on a chat board or a TA. You need to consult the link given in post #6 and/or an attorney who understands this issue.

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Don't rely on what anyone here tells you. You have a valid legal concern that should be addressed by someone in the Canadian Immigration Dept or someone with the Canadian Embassy.

 

Call or e-mail someone with the proper Canadian authority and then you will have the correct answer.

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Why don't you put it on that relative to find out from someone who dealt with him, like a lawyer, parole officer, or probation officer?

 

That's the logical place to find out. It's that persons job to take responsiblity and find out, not yours if he wants to go on the cruise.

 

 

HI: I am thinking about planning an Alaskan cruise with my family. One of my family members has a criminal record. I know that most, if not all, of Alaskan cruises include at least one port call to a city in Canada. People with criminal records are not allowed entry to Canada. Therefore, it is very critical to know whether this family member can still go on the cruise and just remain on the ship when it docks at the Canadian port. The plan would be to go on a cruise that begins and ends either in Seattle or Anchorage (sp?).

 

I would prefer an answer from people who have firm knowledge on this issue. I had read another message thread (don't think it was on this site though) that stated that the person has to be cleared to enter Canada to even be allowed to go on the cruise, and that it isn't a matter of just staying on the ship when it is docked in Canada.

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Please do not listen to the posts on this board (although they mean well). We live 21 miles from Vancouver and are familiar with the laws (however, don't necessarily listen to me either). When someone flies into Vancouver, they DEFINITELY know your background. My step-daughter could not enter Canada for a wedding until she/we paid $200 for a "temporary visa" due to a DUI. Many people in our city cannot enter Canada (without paying these fines) due to DUI's -- not major criminal convictions.

 

Staying on the ship may be an alternative. You don't need a lawyer -- just check with the cruise and line and verify with the Canadian government.

 

What you are looking for is probably doable -- the only thing wrong is checking on CruiseCritic. CC is great for many things. . . . but not legal opinions.;)

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There are criminal records (possession of marijuana)....and then, there are criminal records (robbing a bank). There are criminal records buried in the mists of time (pre-computer)...and there are criminal records where the person is still on parole.

 

It can depend on the criminal record.

 

However....don't rely on just staying on the ship in Victoria. Your relative could be denied boarding in Seattle. The cruise line clears the passenger list with the Canadian government, transmitted before the cruise.

 

As TravelCat2 and others point out: don't depend on any post here, including mine. Get a real answer from Canadian authorities, and/or a lawyer who can act as an intermediary with those officials. Make the person with the record deal with this in advance of even booking.

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HI: I am thinking about planning an Alaskan cruise with my family. One of my family members has a criminal record. I know that most, if not all, of Alaskan cruises include at least one port call to a city in Canada. People with criminal records are not allowed entry to Canada. Therefore, it is very critical to know whether this family member can still go on the cruise and just remain on the ship when it docks at the Canadian port. The plan would be to go on a cruise that begins and ends either in Seattle or Anchorage (sp?).

 

Contact your local Canadian embassy or consulate. It depends a lot of what the offence was, how long ago etc etc. No one here can give a definitive answer, but the embassy/consulate can. And for what it's worth, it's much harder for a Canadian with any kind of record to get into the United States, than the other way around.

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Contact your local Canadian embassy or consulate. It depends a lot of what the offence was, how long ago etc etc. No one here can give a definitive answer, but the embassy/consulate can. And for what it's worth, it's much harder for a Canadian with any kind of record to get into the United States, than the other way around.

 

Interesting I did not realize.

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HI: I am thinking about planning an Alaskan cruise with my family. One of my family members has a criminal record. I know that most, if not all, of Alaskan cruises include at least one port call to a city in Canada. People with criminal records are not allowed entry to Canada. Therefore, it is very critical to know whether this family member can still go on the cruise and just remain on the ship when it docks at the Canadian port. The plan would be to go on a cruise that begins and ends either in Seattle or Anchorage (sp?).

 

I would prefer an answer from people who have firm knowledge on this issue. I had read another message thread (don't think it was on this site though) that stated that the person has to be cleared to enter Canada to even be allowed to go on the cruise, and that it isn't a matter of just staying on the ship when it is docked in Canada.

 

I have managed cruise ships for several decades and have cruised Alaska approximately 300 times. On nearly every trip, we had Americans with criminal records onboard. On nearly every one of those cruises, Canadian authorities contacted my Purser before our arrival and requested that we prevent a certain number of pax from disembarking in Canada before the local officials could come aboard for interviews. After the interviews, those who had previously officially cleared their records with Canadian authorities were usually allowed to go ashore. Those who had not cleared their records were told that they must remain onboard in any Canadian port. Gangway Security is informed to prevent them going ashore.

A very few of those with criminal records were taken away in handcuffs and did not return to the ship. The authorities never give us details, so I have no idea why this happened.

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A very few of those with criminal records were taken away in handcuffs and did not return to the ship. The authorities never give us details, so I have no idea why this happened.

 

 

Outstanding warrants? :confused: You can run but you can't hide....

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Canada does has access to NCIC, but be aware that all arrests and convictions are not entered into NCIC. If an arrest was for a state offense, it is the responsibility of the state to enter that information. With regards to warrants, a warrant is entered into NCIC only if the arresting agency is willing to extradite. Thus, there are very few misdemeanor warrants are in NCIC.

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  • 11 months later...

I'm tired of all the false answers.

 

Lawyers, probation officers, local FBI, etc. do not know. I know from experience as my mom has a criminal record and I have an extensive one, with multiple misdemeanors and current arrest warrants. The only ones who know are Canadian Customs, although you can get a good idea from the FBI's main office in Washington, DC. But otherwise you have to contact Canadian Customs in writing. Allow for 3 years to do all the paperwork, if any, before going on a cruise.

 

Canadian customs has access to the FBI's record of criminal convictions, which is different from the NCIC. They also have access to the NCIC itself. The best way is to check the FBI criminal record database yourself to see if any convictions are present. This will require anywhere from $28 to $55 or so in fees for the Live Scan fingerprint card and the FBI fingerprint fee. It is available on the FBI's website if you do a google search for Live Scan. I do not know if Canadian Customs has access to individual state records that border Canada. If the police agency did not fingerprint you, I know you have no FBI record as the FBI requires a fingerprint card for any arrest. But you probably are in the system anyway if you submitted your prints for volunteer work to the Feds, applied to the Federal government, etc.

 

I am submitting my Live Scan card next week as I plan to go on a 10-day cruise to Alaska in the coming years!

 

But the above said, from my practical experience, Canadian Customs does not check cruise ships, or only does so rarely. If they check, cruise personnel will just prevent you from disembarking that Canadian stop. For the most part, Canadian Customs wants you to disembark in Victoria or Vancouver or wherever to spend MONEY! The cruise ship may ask for your passport number in advance, but Canadian Customs does not check it or does not care. They only care about land or air crossings.

 

Cruise ship, per policy take you, even with a criminal record. They can only refuse to take you if you have active arrest warrants.

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I'm tired of all the false answers.

 

Lawyers, probation officers, local FBI, etc. do not know. I know from experience as my mom has a criminal record and I have an extensive one, with multiple misdemeanors and current arrest warrants. The only ones who know are Canadian Customs, although you can get a good idea from the FBI's main office in Washington, DC. But otherwise you have to contact Canadian Customs in writing. Allow for 3 years to do all the paperwork, if any, before going on a cruise.

 

Canadian customs has access to the FBI's record of criminal convictions, which is different from the NCIC. They also have access to the NCIC itself. The best way is to check the FBI criminal record database yourself to see if any convictions are present. This will require anywhere from $28 to $55 or so in fees for the Live Scan fingerprint card and the FBI fingerprint fee. It is available on the FBI's website if you do a google search for Live Scan. I do not know if Canadian Customs has access to individual state records that border Canada. If the police agency did not fingerprint you, I know you have no FBI record as the FBI requires a fingerprint card for any arrest. But you probably are in the system anyway if you submitted your prints for volunteer work to the Feds, applied to the Federal government, etc.

 

I am submitting my Live Scan card next week as I plan to go on a 10-day cruise to Alaska in the coming years!

 

But the above said, from my practical experience, Canadian Customs does not check cruise ships, or only does so rarely. If they check, cruise personnel will just prevent you from disembarking that Canadian stop. For the most part, Canadian Customs wants you to disembark in Victoria or Vancouver or wherever to spend MONEY! The cruise ship may ask for your passport number in advance, but Canadian Customs does not check it or does not care. They only care about land or air crossings.

 

Cruise ship, per policy take you, even with a criminal record. They can only refuse to take you if you have active arrest warrants.

 

 

Lets revive a thread over a year old to give even more conflicting advice! Horray!!!

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The original post on this was 2 years ago..either the person in question got thrown in the klink or they didn't by now...:rolleyes:

 

I'm tired of all the false answers.

 

Lawyers, probation officers, local FBI, etc. do not know. I know from experience as my mom has a criminal record and I have an extensive one, with multiple misdemeanors and current arrest warrants. The only ones who know are Canadian Customs, although you can get a good idea from the FBI's main office in Washington, DC. But otherwise you have to contact Canadian Customs in writing. Allow for 3 years to do all the paperwork, if any, before going on a cruise.

 

Canadian customs has access to the FBI's record of criminal convictions, which is different from the NCIC. They also have access to the NCIC itself. The best way is to check the FBI criminal record database yourself to see if any convictions are present. This will require anywhere from $28 to $55 or so in fees for the Live Scan fingerprint card and the FBI fingerprint fee. It is available on the FBI's website if you do a google search for Live Scan. I do not know if Canadian Customs has access to individual state records that border Canada. If the police agency did not fingerprint you, I know you have no FBI record as the FBI requires a fingerprint card for any arrest. But you probably are in the system anyway if you submitted your prints for volunteer work to the Feds, applied to the Federal government, etc.

 

I am submitting my Live Scan card next week as I plan to go on a 10-day cruise to Alaska in the coming years!

 

But the above said, from my practical experience, Canadian Customs does not check cruise ships, or only does so rarely. If they check, cruise personnel will just prevent you from disembarking that Canadian stop. For the most part, Canadian Customs wants you to disembark in Victoria or Vancouver or wherever to spend MONEY! The cruise ship may ask for your passport number in advance, but Canadian Customs does not check it or does not care. They only care about land or air crossings.

 

Cruise ship, per policy take you, even with a criminal record. They can only refuse to take you if you have active arrest warrants.

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