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If 'you' were denied boarding - did 'you' loose all that was paid for the cruise ?


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Yes as long as it is a closed loop cruise where you leave and return to the same port then you can still travel on a birth certificate and photo ID. This is from the passport website

 

this is from the website for travel after June 1, 2009

 

 

How will the final WHTI requirements affect passengers going on cruises?



U.S. citizens on closed-loop cruises (cruises that begin and end at the same port in the U.S.) will be able to enter or depart the country with proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate and government-issued photo ID. A U.S. citizen under the age of 16 will be able to present either an original or a copy of his or her birth certificate, a Consular Report of Birth Abroad issued by DOS, or a Certificate of Naturalization issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.


Please be aware that you may still be required to present a passport when you dock at a foreign port, depending on the islands or countries that your cruise ship is visiting. Check with your cruiseline to ensure you have the appropriate documents for the stops you’ll be making on your cruise.

 

 

 

 

  • U.S. citizens ages 19 and older must present documentation that proves both identity and citizenship. Identification documents must include a photo, name and date of birth. View the complete list of acceptable documents at CBP.gov for land travel and sea travel.
  • Children ages 18 and under will only be required to present proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate.
  • U.S. citizens can also apply for a U.S. Passport Card, which facilitates entry and expedites document processing at U.S. land and sea ports-of-entry when arriving from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda. The card may not be used to travel by air. Otherwise, it carries the rights and privileges of the U.S. passport book and is adjudicated to the exact same standards.
  • More information for specific populations and situations

As I read it, that was the problem, she had no proof of US citizenship. All she has is a Canadian birth certificate and a Canadian passport.
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As I read it, that was the problem, she had no proof of US citizenship. All she has is a Canadian birth certificate and a Canadian passport.

 

 

 

the person who asked for the clarification was not the OP and IS a US citizen and wanted some verification on the upcoming rules.

 

 

Barbie if you go the RCCL website and click the before you board tab and then travel documents and then domestic cruises it states the same info as I posted above.

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I would write to RCCL and explain the situation and see if they will issue a future cruise credit to be applied to another booking. A lot of times they will do this as a courtesy, but the FCC is non-transferrable and is only valid for 1 yr from the date of issue.

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How nice that there's finally a way to force these people to take care of their children before themselves.

 

I agree. A person who owes child support should not be going anywhere that they would require a passport until they pay what they owe.

 

As for the situation, I am still confused. Why couldn't the friends of the OP just use her Canadian passport if she has dual citizenship (proved or not, the Canadian part must be valid since she was born there)? That is certainly a valid piece of ID. I don't understand what having a US SSN and applying for a green card has to do with anything.

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No problem, both my wife and I are dual citizens, hold american and british passports, and our daughter who was, Made in England, Born in the USA;), also holds both passports, and will not have to choose when she turns 18.

 

It really confuses the border patrol when we go back to England, as a US citizen you have to leave the country using your US passport, as a UK citizen, you have to enter the UK suing the UK passport, when we come back home to the states, immigration ask why there is no stamp in our passport, it looks like we haven't been anywhere!!:)

 

You might check this out!

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/5170688/New-border-controls-could-penalise-Britons-with-dual-nationality.html

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As for the situation, I am still confused. Why couldn't the friends of the OP just use her Canadian passport if she has dual citizenship (proved or not, the Canadian part must be valid since she was born there)? That is certainly a valid piece of ID. I don't understand what having a US SSN and applying for a green card has to do with anything.

 

Hi Susie,

I did not think of the explanation given below by uksimonusa ( even that I knew about that from some other travel experience) but that is where the difference of applying for 'green card' - permanent residency came in.

"The girl" did travel out of the country (US) previously ( with a parent) using the Canadian passport as her ID and proof of citizenship. Last time was a cruise in dec. of 2008 - no problems. This time, because an application was submitted for the 'green card', her immigration status got changed and she was not allow to travel outside the US. And the reason her Mom decided to apply for the permanent residency for her daughter, because she is getting older and will need SSN for many things , possibly even when applying for driver's license. "The Mom" had no idea that applying for permanent residency will make any effect on their cruise. Probably many of us would not think about that either.

Please read the post below which explains the 'green card' and travel. Wes

 

 

 

The chosing at a certain age does not apply anymore, you are a dual citizen for life, but it seems that, although the dual citizenship, is automatic, the needed paperwork had not been filed, so there was no way to prove the dual citizenship, by applying for the "green Card" the process was started, but international travel is not allowed while the case is adjudicated, unless advance parole has been applied for. So in short, she is a dual citizen, but has no acceptable way to prove it at the border
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If you are delinquent enough on taxes to the IRS that is another reason a passport can be denied/seized. My ex-wife has that problem (glad it is not mine).

 

Sympathy to the OP. Usually I am of the camp that you better know what documents you need and you better have them and if you don't, too bad, so sad. But that situation is unusual and I can see where you'd have to be an expert in immigration/citizenship law to see that one coming.

 

Oh well, off to Vancouver in the morning for a daytrip. With my trusty blue passport in hand.

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Thanks for pointing that out, the article appears to refer to Dual nationals, which is different to Dual Citizens, but I will check it out further and see exactly who it applies to, sometimes newspapers report one wording and mean another

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I believe that a USA citizen giving birth in a foreign land should have the US Consulate issue a document of foreign birth for a US citizen. Most people (depending on local laws) born in this manner are of dual citizenship, but the paperwork had better be there to prove it.

Steve

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The chosing at a certain age does not apply anymore, you are a dual citizen for life, but it seems that, although the dual citizenship, is automatic, the needed paperwork had not been filed, so there was no way to prove the dual citizenship, by applying for the "green Card" the process was started, but international travel is not allowed while the case is adjudicated, unless advance parole has been applied for. So in short, she is a dual citizen, but has no acceptable way to prove it at the border
I believe that a USA citizen giving birth in a foreign land should have the US Consulate issue a document of foreign birth for a US citizen. Most people (depending on local laws) born in this manner are of dual citizenship, but the paperwork had better be there to prove it.

Steve

I cannot cite the applicable law, but have friends whose story backs Steve up. Father was working in the Mariana Islands as a US Government employee when Marianas were still a US Trust Territory. Most US citizens in the Marianas who gave birth went to the hospital in Guam [part of the US as it is US territory (not trust territory)]. Mother had a home birth in the Marianas. When they were scheduled to return to the US they discovered that their daughter was NOT a US citizen as the birth had not been registered at a US Consulate within the required time [18 months, 2 years, 3 years??]. Daughter became a US citizen only by naturalization. To get even more complicated, Germany does not recognize you as a citizen even if born in Germany unless one of your parents is a German citizen; so a child born of US parents in Germany and not registered with a US Consulate apparently would not be a citizen of any country:eek:. [Note that births in US Military Hospitals in Germany and elsewhere are automatically registered.]
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Hi, I just stumbled on this thread and have a few comments, despite not having any experience with being denied boarding:

 

First of all, I'm sorry this unfortunate situation happened, how disappointing to be denied boarding! I am always slihtly paranoid that something unexpected is going to happen and I won't be allowed on board.

 

Secondly, I am very confused about that person's immigration status. A citizen can't apply for a green card. A "green card" or permanent resident card is for permanent residents, people who live in the US without being citizens. If she is a citizen there would never ever be any need to apply for residency.

 

I don't understand how applying for residency (when not eligible for residency on account of already being a citizen) would prove citizenship. I'm just really curious about this :p I'm also really curious to know how she was able to leave the US and return without a US passport, a green card or some type of visa in the past.

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Hi, I just stumbled on this thread and have a few comments, despite not having any experience with being denied boarding:

 

First of all, I'm sorry this unfortunate situation happened, how disappointing to be denied boarding! I am always slihtly paranoid that something unexpected is going to happen and I won't be allowed on board.

 

Secondly, I am very confused about that person's immigration status. A citizen can't apply for a green card. A "green card" or permanent resident card is for permanent residents, people who live in the US without being citizens. If she is a citizen there would never ever be any need to apply for residency.

 

I don't understand how applying for residency (when not eligible for residency on account of already being a citizen) would prove citizenship. I'm just really curious about this :p I'm also really curious to know how she was able to leave the US and return without a US passport, a green card or some type of visa in the past.

 

Hi,

I am the OP but I can not give you more detail information because I do not know it. When I started the thread I was mostly interested if anyone in the past was denied a boarding and possibly got some credit for future cruise or whatever. All that I posted is what the neighbor told me.

I do have to agree with you that it does not make much sense to apply for the 'permanent residency' if one is a citizen. Maybe someone else got some explanation.

Wes

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Hi, I just stumbled on this thread and have a few comments, despite not having any experience with being denied boarding:

 

First of all, I'm sorry this unfortunate situation happened, how disappointing to be denied boarding! I am always slihtly paranoid that something unexpected is going to happen and I won't be allowed on board.

 

Secondly, I am very confused about that person's immigration status. A citizen can't apply for a green card. A "green card" or permanent resident card is for permanent residents, people who live in the US without being citizens. If she is a citizen there would never ever be any need to apply for residency.

 

I don't understand how applying for residency (when not eligible for residency on account of already being a citizen) would prove citizenship. I'm just really curious about this :p I'm also really curious to know how she was able to leave the US and return without a US passport, a green card or some type of visa in the past.

I THINK [not absolutely sure] that the girl is NOT a US citizen since despite her parents being US citizens her birth in Canada was not recorded in a timely manner with a US Consulate. Previously she was being treated by US authorities as a Canadian citizen in transit thru the US [certainly most Canadian citizens who take Caribbean cruises transist thru the US to their port of embarkation].

 

Applying for Permanent Residency status [Green Card] alerted the US authorities that she had been living in the US extra-legally. Since the girl has now "appeared on the US authorities radar screen" she is likely to be denied entry to the US until her status is clarified [it is far easier for them to deny her entry than it is to go thru the trouble of deporting her].

 

Thom

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How nice that there's finally a way to force these people to take care of their children before themselves.

 

Hey it just needs to be said -- While the majority of cases where someone is denied a passport because of child support issues may be due to non-payment; I would not make a blanket statement that all cases that these people are taking care of themselves before their children.

 

I know of many cases where the non-custodial parent is making all of their payments in-full and on-time, but where the custodial parent may be using the "system" to make the other parent's life a "living heck". What can happen while that is working its way throught the court system can be technically seen as being "out of compliance".

 

While I too applaud efforts to make parents responsible for their children's well-being, I won't jump to the conclusion that anyone denied a passport for back child support, is not looking out for thier kids.

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Regarding whether or not she could have just used her Canadian passport, I'm wondering whether or not she needed to surrender it as part of the immigration process.

 

2P.P1

 

Hi,

according what I was told everybody had their passports wih them: the neighbor ( US passport)- who is the Mom of the girl with the Canadian passport ( who did have the passport with her, the son ( US passport) and a friend of the daughter ( US passport).

The application for permanent residency was sent to the US officials in Feb.

Wes

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Hi, I just stumbled on this thread and have a few comments, despite not having any experience with being denied boarding:

 

First of all, I'm sorry this unfortunate situation happened, how disappointing to be denied boarding! I am always slihtly paranoid that something unexpected is going to happen and I won't be allowed on board.

 

Secondly, I am very confused about that person's immigration status. A citizen can't apply for a green card. A "green card" or permanent resident card is for permanent residents, people who live in the US without being citizens. If she is a citizen there would never ever be any need to apply for residency.

 

I don't understand how applying for residency (when not eligible for residency on account of already being a citizen) would prove citizenship. I'm just really curious about this :p I'm also really curious to know how she was able to leave the US and return without a US passport, a green card or some type of visa in the past.

 

I'm not sure, but I think a birth abroad, has to be registered within a certain time from for the claim for US citizenship to be valid, as the person in question is looking to do drivers ed I would imagine she is around 16, so they may have waited to long to obtain citizenship, and applied for a green card as an unmarried daughter of a us citizen. This sould eventually lead to citizen ship anyway

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Regarding whether or not she could have just used her Canadian passport, I'm wondering whether or not she needed to surrender it as part of the immigration process.

 

2P.P1

 

US immigration does not make you surrender your passport.

 

As for the girl not being a citizen, or at least not yet registered as such, I also believe that must be the case. I also understand that her pending application would have alerted authorities to her status. But I can't understand how her status went unnoticed when she traveled before that. Surely it would look suspicious to immigration officials if the whole family has US passports and she does not? She'd have to stand in a different line, for one.

 

I'm not entirely sure how things work for Canadian citizens, but don't they too have to prove to US immigration that they are just passing through, not intending to stay in the country like citizens of other countries have to do when entering the US?

 

On a somewhat different subject, I agree with the person who said that not we shouldn't judge too quickly when it comes to child support issues.

 

 

To be somewhat more on topic, the documentation I saw for the cruises I went on stated that passports and such are the passenger's sole responsibility. They can't let you on if you paperwork is not in order and it's not their fault, so I don't see how they would ever be inclined to pay someone back in that situation. I don't know if they ever deny boarding for other reasons, but you might have more of a chance to get paid back then.

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Hey it just needs to be said -- While the majority of cases where someone is denied a passport because of child support issues may be due to non-payment; I would not make a blanket statement that all cases that these people are taking care of themselves before their children.

 

I know of many cases where the non-custodial parent is making all of their payments in-full and on-time, but where the custodial parent may be using the "system" to make the other parent's life a "living heck". What can happen while that is working its way throught the court system can be technically seen as being "out of compliance".

 

While I too applaud efforts to make parents responsible for their children's well-being, I won't jump to the conclusion that anyone denied a passport for back child support, is not looking out for thier kids.

 

What I was really trying to get at is that there are finally ways to force parents to honor their obligations. Unfortunately, there will be occasions when a passport is denied because the custodial parent is playing games and I'm sorry for anyone that may find themselves in that situation.

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