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liner vs cruise ship


Megan_Strick

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I'm watching birth of a legand about the QM2. What is the diff between a liner and a cruise ship?

Liners were designed with much deeper hull. Ships today with 24 foot deep hulls and back then they were about 36 feet. They were designed to be fast and go through areas like the North Atlantic.....

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I'm watching birth of a legand about the QM2. What is the diff between a liner and a cruise ship?

 

Liners were built for travel from Point A to Point B. They were usually built for speed and had more than one class of cabin. Most also carried cargo, usually high value goods.

 

Cruise ships are specifically designed from pleasure cruises. They have different amenities and different emphasis in the public areas. They, generally are built to run more economically with a cruising speed somewhere around 21 knots.

 

Many liners, after Trans-Atlantic flights came to dominate the trade, were converted to cruising, but they were just that: converted liners. They lack the easy flow and leisure oriented facilities we have come to desire. Now, I saw the program about the QM2. While it is true the current Cunarders has some characteristics of a liner, they are truly cruise ships. No one can make money carrying passengers from New York to Southampton on are scheduled basis anymore.

 

Doc

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My understand in addition to the previous posts...is really that a "liner" is typically a steel hulled ship...made for running in almost any weather...think North Atlantic...where a "cruise" ship is an aluminum hull...which really needs calmer seas.

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I'm watching birth of a legand about the QM2. What is the diff between a liner and a cruise ship?

 

Ocean Liner

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

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250px-SS_United_States_postcard.jpg magnify-clip.png

A postcard of United States

 

 

An ocean liner is a ship designed to transport people from one seaport to another along regular long-distance maritime routes according to a schedule. Liners may also carry cargo, mail, and may sometimes be used for other purposes (e.g., for pleasure cruises or as troopships).

Cargo vessels running to a schedule are sometimes referred to as liners.[1] The category does not include ferries or other vessels engaged in short-sea trading, nor dedicated cruise ships where the voyage itself, and not transportation, is the prime purpose of the trip. Nor does it include tramp steamers, even those equipped to handle limited numbers of passengers. Some shipping companies refer to themselves as "lines" and their container ships, which often operate over set routes according to established schedules, as "liners".

Ocean liners are usually strongly built with a high freeboard to withstand rough seas and adverse conditions encountered in the open ocean, having large capacities for fuel, victuals, and other stores for consumption on long voyages.

 

 

Cruise Ship

 

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350px-MSMajestyOfTheSeasEdit1.JPG magnify-clip.png

MS Majesty of the Seas, a cruise ship completed in 1992

 

 

A cruise ship or cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ship's amenities are part of the experience. Cruising has become a major part of the tourism industry, with millions of passengers each year. The industry's rapid growth has seen nine or more newly built ships catering to a North American clientele added every year since 2001, as well as others servicing European clientele. Smaller markets such as the Asia-Pacific region are generally serviced by older tonnage displaced by new ships introduced into the high growth areas. Cruise ships operate mostly on routes that return passengers to their originating port. In contrast, dedicated transport oriented ocean liners do "line voyages" and typically transport passengers from one point to another, rather than on round trips. Some liners also engage in longer trips which may not lead back to the same port for many months.[1]

Traditionally, an ocean liner for the transoceanic trade will be built to a higher standard than a typical cruise ship, including stronger plating to withstand ocean voyages, most commonly crossing the North Atlantic. The only dedicated transatlantic ocean liner in operation as a liner, as of December 2008, was the Queen Mary 2 of the Cunard fleet. The liner Queen Mary is in service as a hotel in Long Beach, USA, the Queen Elizabeth 2 is slated for similar duty in Dubai, and the United States is currently stored in Philadelphia, USA, with long-standing plans to return it to service, although this appears increasingly unlikely given its age and condition.[2]

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