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Boatsie

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  1. For specifically the Oasis of the Seas....they have a bunch of crew members on board (14 reported and unofficially around 60) who have tested positive for corona virus. The logistics of how they plan on getting the crew off the ship are unknown, so that might throw a wrench into their plans...for the whole industry, over & above the problems dealing with a manpower nightmare with future ‘paying’ bookings drying up, (1) there is no cure for viruses; (2) vaccine for the virus is 12 months away at best; (3) most every port for touring & replenishing supplies, is closed thru summer (4) a lot of people who might have cruised, are currently unemployed. Cruising in June isn’t happening...RCCL & all the other know it, they just want to hold on to everyone’s money as long as they can.
  2. Another vote for taking the money while you have a chance and they still have it to give. You’ll have to get in line though...still waiting for my cash refund I asked for over 2 weeks ago for cruise they cancelled.
  3. Requested refund via RCCL email links over 2 weeks ago for our cruise (cancelled by RCCL) that was supposed to sail this past Sunday. We also used FCCs from Hurricane Dorian cancellation to pay portion of this cruise. As of today (Mar 31)..our credit card showed no refunds of taxes/port charges; no refund of cruise fare; and we haven’t seen any email about reissue of FCCs Something to consider for people opting for FCCs vs. the cash refund...once you relinquish your cash refund for (essentially purchasing?) the 125% FCCs, and if the next cruise you pick doesn’t sail...there will be no cash offer the next time around.
  4. I think that’s the way it is supposed to work...i’ve done that (using an FCC towards purchase of my present cancelled cruise) and still waiting on reissue of that FCC with an extended expiration date. I have $2200 in FCC hanging in limbo at the moment—people considering taking them up on the FCCs they’re offering shouldn’t assume they are as good as the cash amount shown on the certificate. I’ve heard there is currently some confusion at RCCL of handling these FCCs to book new cruises (depending on who at RCCL you call), they’re making you put a cash deposit down on new cruise before applying the 125% FCC, even though they rolled your original cash deposit into the 125% FCC. It’s screwed up and confusing for those wanting new trips. However, I don’t think it’s an issue if you use your FCC to pay off a future cruise you’ve already got booked. Add to that the issue that they’re supposed to refund the cash value of taxes & port fees from the cancelled cruise to your credit card fairly quickly (before calculating the 125% FCC)....i’m still waiting to see that come back to my card too. As they continue to slowly drag this thing out and cancel cruises bit-by-bit, and more cruises are cancelled, the FCC situation will get more & more complicated as they issue, reissue & re-reissue these things. FCCs might be a good idea for people applying them to an already-booked cruise with a time horizon in mid-to-late 2021, otherwise, it’s like playing a game of whack-a-mole picking cruises that may or may not be sailing.
  5. They wouldn’t take the first 125% certificate and add another 25% on that...they’d simply take the 125% certificate and maybe extend the expiration date at best. In my case, I used a “Hurricane Dorian” FCC to purchase a portion of a cruise RCCL cancelled in the first round of cancellations....it’s been 10 days since I filed the refund request from the cancellation notification and I still haven’t heard a peep out of RCCL on the status of my requested cash refund or extension of my old FCC.
  6. How much will you lose if you don’t hand over final payment now? Under the CWC program, I believe getting a percentage of your total cruise cost refunded has been flushed. Once they have you’re money, and you cancel under CWC, you only get back FCC. If the cruise gets “voluntarily” cancelled by them, which was the case currently, it’s 125% or refund. But future cancellations just might be “mandated” by authorities...in which case, the refund rules just might change again, and not probably in the favor of the customers.
  7. But what if we used some old FCC to purchase a portion of this cruise and there was still time left to the old FCC expiration date (September 2020)...what happens in that case?
  8. If we booked the our now cancelled RCCL cruise that was partially purchased with FCC gotten from another cruise that was cancelled due to hurricane...how do they usually credit that?
  9. Ouch! Sorry to hear that. You might want to consider looking into spending the week at a really nice Orlando resort ...with Disney World & Universal shutting down, there may be some screaming last minute deals on hotels
  10. Mom (or Dad?) and daughter USA Roadtrip!...Route 66 Chicago to Santa Monica, CA 👍
  11. Does a cruise have to be taken before the FCC “expiration date,” or does it just need to be BOOKED before the expiration date (and therefore taken after the expiration date).
  12. It wasn’t a WH proposal to ban travelers over 70..it came from Adam Goldstein, the CEO of Cruise Line International Association (& former VP of RCCL) who represents the cruise line industry https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/11/coronavirus-cruise-industry-proposes-travel-ban-for-people-over-70.html
  13. The problem is...they are keeping the money of the 70+ year old people (who might not be fit to travel or whose doctor doesn’t want the liability of signing a form) and giving them worthless FCC in return. If they don’t want the customer to cruise...give them back the cash they paid for the cruise.
  14. Well, it doesn’t surprise me that’s NCL is first out of the gate with keeping the money of its 70+ year old customers...it’s balance sheet has been bleeding the reddest ink of the lot going into this situation. Now most every cruise line is pocketing the final payment funds in total, in exchange for their FCCs (whose value may be flushed should they file for bankruptcy protection—a very likely scenario for a few of them). The corona virus has drained the swamp...and it’s becoming crystal clear to the world that all the cruise lines are pretty much naked and deeply in debt.
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