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If 'you' were denied boarding - did 'you' loose all that was paid for the cruise ?


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Hi,

I just talked with my neighbor and was told that 'they' could not board the Serenade ( last week) because there was a problem with her daughter's documents ( immigration) - from anyone's experience in a similar situation - did 'you' loose all what was paid for the cruise ? or were 'you' able to get a 'break' from RCI in any form ( future discount on a cruise or whatever ) ?

Wes

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Wow, that is really upsetting. Did they say what the problems w/ the documents were?

 

Yes,

that was upsetting although they were able to somewhat 'recover' their vacation - they were able to stay in PR for the few days and enjoyed the island.

As far as the 'immigration documents ' problem I do not know all the details but was told by the neighbour that it was an unusual situtation:

her daughter was born in Canada ( US citizens parents) and lives from the time when she was a little baby in the US ( with her Mom). She has been on few cruises already and there never was a problem (the daughter does have a Canadian passport ). Last cruise was in Dec of 2008.

Now she is of the age that she will be taken driver's course in school - she needs a SS number. She could not apply for that because the parents never applied for her for "permanent residency status' , so couple of months ago they did apply. According to the immigration officials that changed her 'immigration status' and she was denied by the immigration officials boarding . They did have insurance but that does not apply either.

Wes

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Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

My two nephews were born in Scotland to American Parents serving there in the US Navy. They did not live on a base. They had duel citizenship and were able to choose which country they would become a citizen with when they reached a certain age and were old enough to decide on their own.

Why would the child be an automatic Canadian citizen and not a duel American/Canadian citizen until older enough to chose?

When did that law change?

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Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

My two nephews were born in Scotland to American Parents serving there in the US Navy. They had duel citizenship and were able to choose which country they would become a citizen with when they reached a certain age.

Why would the child be an automatic Canadian citizen and not a duel American citizen until older enough to chose?

 

The chosing at a certain age does not apply anymore, you are a dual citizen for life, but it seems that, although the dual citizenship, is automatic, the needed paperwork had not been filed, so there was no way to prove the dual citizenship, by applying for the "green Card" the process was started, but international travel is not allowed while the case is adjudicated, unless advance parole has been applied for. So in short, she is a dual citizen, but has no acceptable way to prove it at the border

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Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

My two nephews were born in Scotland to American Parents serving there in the US Navy. They had duel citizenship and were able to choose which country they would become a citizen with when they reached a certain age.

Why would the child be an automatic Canadian citizen and not a duel American citizen until older enough to chose?

 

Hi,

I do not know 'why' - I did not ask those question when talking with the neighbor ..... perhaps because the daughter is not old enough to make that choice yet and Canadian passport could have been obtained because she was born there.

But it does not matter about the immigration status in this post - I am just interested if anyone was able to get some break from the cruise line. There were four people that were going on that cruise and none went, .... so the lose is big.

Wes

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The chosing at a certain age does not apply anymore, you are a dual citizen for life, but it seems that, although the dual citizenship, is automatic, the needed paperwork had not been filed, so there was no way to prove the dual citizenship, by applying for the "green Card" the process was started, but international travel is not allowed while the case is adjudicated, unless advance parole has been applied for. So in short, she is a dual citizen, but has no acceptable way to prove it at the border

 

Thank you for explaining that to me. I did not know it had changed. ;)

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=wieslaw:

Yes,

that was upsetting although they were able to somewhat 'recover' their vacation - they were able to stay in PR for the few days and enjoyed the island.

 

As far as the 'immigration documents ' problem I do not know all the details but was told by the neighbour that it was an unusual situtation:

her daughter was born in Canada ( US citizens parents) and lives from the time when she was a little baby in the US ( with her Mom). She has been on few cruises already and there never was a problem (the daughter does have a Canadian passport ). Last cruise was in Dec of 2008.

Now she is of the age that she will be taken driver's course in school - she needs a SS number. She could not apply for that because the parents never applied for her for "permanent residency status' , so couple of months ago they did apply. According to the immigration officials that changed her 'immigration status' and she was denied by the immigration officials boarding . They did have insurance but that does not apply either.

 

Wes

 

 

Hi,

 

I do not know 'why' - I did not ask those question when talking with the neighbor ..... perhaps because the daughter is not old enough to make that choice yet and Canadian passport could have been obtained because she was born there.

 

But it does not matter about the immigration status in this post - I am just interested if anyone was able to get some break from the cruise line. There were four people that were going on that cruise and none went, .... so the lose is big.

 

Wes

 

 

I only asked my question to anyone on the boards because of the

circumstances you mentioned. I wanted to know if it was still correct or not?

"was born in Canada ( US citizens parents) "

 

I was not addressing that to you. Sorry. This is how we find out most of our information on these boards.

Someone did answer me so I now know the law was changed.

I now know, that my information is old and outdated.

This below is now the new.;)

 

The chosing at a certain age does not apply anymore, you are a dual citizen for life, but it seems that, although the dual citizenship, is automatic, the needed paperwork had not been filed, so there was no way to prove the dual citizenship, by applying for the "green Card" the process was started, but international travel is not allowed while the case is adjudicated, unless advance parole has been applied for. So in short, she is a dual citizen, but has no acceptable way to prove it at the border
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The chosing at a certain age does not apply anymore, you are a dual citizen for life, but it seems that, although the dual citizenship, is automatic, the needed paperwork had not been filed, so there was no way to prove the dual citizenship, by applying for the "green Card" the process was started, but international travel is not allowed while the case is adjudicated, unless advance parole has been applied for. So in short, she is a dual citizen, but has no acceptable way to prove it at the border

 

Hi,

thanks for that explanation that explains why she was able to travel in Dec 2008. Probably her Mom did not even think about that possibility. The immigration officials were able to verify that there was application for the 'green card' and that turn on the 'no go' light.

 

Wes

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I was not addressing that to you. Sorry. This is how we find out most of our information on these boards.

Someone did answer me so I now know the law was changed.

 

Hi Alexis,

Please, why the 'sorry' - you did not do anything that requires that. If anything I do thank you for your response. That is how I learn things too - that is why I am asking here.

In fact, I should have known about the rule of 'no travel' while the green card is being applied for. I had some friends that were in that status, but applied for the 'advance parole' and we did go on a cruise with them. But in this case it seemed so much different - the girl has been here just about her whole life and parents are US citizens ..... we learn something new all the time.

It is just too bad that this 'mistake' is so costly - the neighbors are really nice and good people ..... I do wish that they could recover at leat some of their cost - but I do know that it does not look good for them.

Wes

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Hi Alexis,

 

Please, why the 'sorry' - you did not do anything that requires that. If anything I do thank you for your response. That is how I learn things too - that is why I am asking here.

In fact, I should have known about the rule of 'no travel' while the green card is being applied for. I had some friends that were in that status, but applied for the 'advance parole' and we did go on a cruise with them. But in this case it seemed so much different - the girl has been here just about her whole life and parents are US citizens ..... we learn something new all the time.

It is just too bad that this 'mistake' is so costly - the neighbors are really nice and good people ..... I do wish that they could recover at leat some of their cost - but I do know that it does not look good for them.

 

Wes

 

Well it was off topic in a way and I was really more interested in the citizenship part of the answer. We don't get that many questions like this on here and I kind of jumped on the chance to ask my question.

So, my "sorry" was because when one goes astray, that is polite. :D

I am extremely glad that you asked this, but not under those circumstances. I am very sad for the poor family who had to go through the canceled cruise. I am sure they were heart broken and I wish them luck.

Please keep us posted on their results. ;)

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Thank you for explaining that to me. I did not know it had changed. ;)

 

No problem, both my wife and I are dual citizens, hold american and british passports, and our daughter who was, Made in England, Born in the USA;), also holds both passports, and will not have to choose when she turns 18.

 

It really confuses the border patrol when we go back to England, as a US citizen you have to leave the country using your US passport, as a UK citizen, you have to enter the UK suing the UK passport, when we come back home to the states, immigration ask why there is no stamp in our passport, it looks like we haven't been anywhere!!:)

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To answer the original question (thank you for the wonderful clarification on the citizenship issues:)), typically if you are denied boarding for failure to have proper paperwork, you do not receive anything back from the cruiseline as it isn't their fault.

 

Now, they could try writing RCCL and see if they will allow them to apply the value to another cruise but most likely they will fall back on the contract and say no. They might be entitled to a refund of the government taxes and fees though.

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as far as passports are concerned. Before you start, I know how important it is but if there are circumstances where you can't get one - that being said. I wrote to RCCL to confirm that an upcoming cruise Miami to Miami in July we wouldn't have a problem - no response from them. Any thoughts

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as far as passports are concerned. Before you start, I know how important it is but if there are circumstances where you can't get one - that being said. I wrote to RCCL to confirm that an upcoming cruise Miami to Miami in July we wouldn't have a problem - no response from them. Any thoughts

 

Please explain under which circumstances you can not get a passport. I trust the government has not taken the passport away from you because you are a flight risk.

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Please explain under which circumstances you can not get a passport. I trust the government has not taken the passport away from you because you are a flight risk.

 

 

there are many reasons you can't get a passport a big one now is if you owe child support.

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To answer the original question (thank you for the wonderful clarification on the citizenship issues:)), typically if you are denied boarding for failure to have proper paperwork, you do not receive anything back from the cruiseline as it isn't their fault.

 

Now, they could try writing RCCL and see if they will allow them to apply the value to another cruise but most likely they will fall back on the contract and say no. They might be entitled to a refund of the government taxes and fees though.

 

Hi,

I do agree with you that it is not RCI's fault that there was no proper documentation presented ...... in some way it is a little ironic on my part, but I am glad that perhaps RCI can be proud of their employees that they did their job well. Perhaps 'they' (RCI) saved my neighbors even a bigger problem - who knows, perhaps immigration would deny the entry to the US to the child on the way back.

My neighbor did not complain ( in the conversation with me) about RCI or even the immigration officials ..... she just basically told me what happened. She was provided some information to follow up with RCI, so maybe, just maybe there will be a little more than the government taxes. She did not blame anyone and was not aware of the 'immigration status change' because of the application for permanent residence ....... now she knows ..... and perhaps some of us will remeber this information for a future use..... there has to be more people in a similar 'dual citizenship status'.

She did not even complain about the possibility of all the money being lost ( jr had to cost some money) - but it has to be hard to loose your cruise and the money as well.

I am sure someone got an upgrade to the just 'available jr".

I do know the chances of getting anything from RCI are very slim.

Wes

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Wes, I hope I did not imply that your friends were in any way complaining as I did not get that impression from your original post. I just wanted to mention the idea of writing to RCCL to see if they could help them out in anyway.

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I know you are a TA, we are booked however, on a closed looped cruise and it says even aft5er 6/1 when the rule goes into effect thaqt we won't need a passport.

 

 

Yes as long as it is a closed loop cruise where you leave and return to the same port then you can still travel on a birth certificate and photo ID. This is from the passport website

 

this is from the website for travel after June 1, 2009

 

How will the final WHTI requirements affect passengers going on cruises?



U.S. citizens on closed-loop cruises (cruises that begin and end at the same port in the U.S.) will be able to enter or depart the country with proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate and government-issued photo ID. A U.S. citizen under the age of 16 will be able to present either an original or a copy of his or her birth certificate, a Consular Report of Birth Abroad issued by DOS, or a Certificate of Naturalization issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Please be aware that you may still be required to present a passport when you dock at a foreign port, depending on the islands or countries that your cruise ship is visiting. Check with your cruiseline to ensure you have the appropriate documents for the stops you’ll be making on your cruise.

 

 

 

  • U.S. citizens ages 19 and older must present documentation that proves both identity and citizenship. Identification documents must include a photo, name and date of birth. View the complete list of acceptable documents at CBP.gov for land travel and sea travel.
  • Children ages 18 and under will only be required to present proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate.
  • U.S. citizens can also apply for a U.S. Passport Card, which facilitates entry and expedites document processing at U.S. land and sea ports-of-entry when arriving from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda. The card may not be used to travel by air. Otherwise, it carries the rights and privileges of the U.S. passport book and is adjudicated to the exact same standards.
  • More information for specific populations and situations

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