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India: Travel Tips, Trends? Ideas & Insights?


TLCOhio
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What is new and best for India?  First time to be visiting India and these other locations. Love to learn any smart tips, suggestions and secrets for these various, exotic parts of the world.

 

Our India plans for early 2024 include doing private tour options for Agra, New Delhi, etc. Then fly to Mumbai/Bombay Feb. 11, a day there, then starting 18-day Silversea cruise with stops at Mormugao (Goa), New Mangalore and Cochin. Then stops in Sri Lanka, Myanmar/Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, etc., before finishing Feb. 29 in Singapore. Added time in Singapore, then fly to Tokyo for 2.5 days there before flying home through DFW.

 

Below is my graphic for our general travel plan.  Tips, ideas, insights?

image.thumb.png.be9bf0fbd19bd5aabd2430c33a798b13.png

 

From  CNN, the cable news network, earlier this week, they had this headline: India is now the most populous country in the world. And it’s ready to become a tourism force with these highlights:Having recently become the world’s most populous nation, India has sparked much speculation about whether it will continue to surpass China in other arenas.  All eyes now are on the South Asian superpower’s growing influence on the global stage. And the tourism industry is no exception. By 2024, Indians are expected to spend   more than $42 billion per year on outbound travel.  India is experiencing what Omri Morgenshtern, CEO of travel and bookings website Agoda, calls a tourism 'boom,' and is currently 'the biggest growing outbound destination.' 

 

Here is more from this story: "It isn’t just about the number of people traveling, either. The country is continuing to pour billions of dollars into growing its aviation industry and cementing its status as a travel hub."

 

Full story at:

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/india-outbound-tourism-intl-hnk/index.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Sydney to NZ/Auckland Adventure, live/blog 2014 sampling/details with many exciting visuals and key highlights.  On page 23, post #571, see a complete index for all of the pictures, postings.  Now at 243,992 views.

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This is a great itinerary, TLCOhio.  We will be doing almost the exact same itinerary on the Oceania Riviera in January 2024 from Mumbai.  We already had the pleasure of visiting India for two weeks in April 2018.  Amazing place but the food, to me anyway, let something to be desired.  DW loved the food, however. 

 

I do not know what will happen with Myanmar.  Oceania's 2023 cruises have cancelled the port stop there due to the political instability of the country.  SS may have different plans.  Oceania has not cancelled our 3-day port stop for 2024 yet, but I expect that will happen.  

 

BTW, I like your map!

 

Bill

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On 6/16/2023 at 12:30 PM, ssawjo said:

This is a great itinerary, TLCOhio.  We will be doing almost the exact same itinerary on the Oceania Riviera in January 2024 from Mumbai.  We already had the pleasure of visiting India for two weeks in April 2018.  Amazing place but the food, to me anyway, let something to be desired.  DW loved the food, however. 

I do not know what will happen with Myanmar.  Oceania's 2023 cruises have cancelled the port stop there due to the political instability of the country.  SS may have different plans.  Oceania has not cancelled our 3-day port stop for 2024 yet, but I expect that will happen.  BTW, I like your map!    Bill

 

Yes, Bill, it is a great itinerary, but, late this week, Silversea announced a change.  The three days in Myanmar/Burma have been scrubbed due the military/government tensions and uncertainty in that challenged nation.  No surprise.  

 

They have added additional stops in Sri Lanka for Hambantota and Trincomalee, plus added time for scenic Phuket in Thailand.  We welcome any and all tips, ideas and suggestions for these areas.

 

Appreciate the kind comment on the map.  Will have to revise that visual in the coming weeks.  

 

Please share more from your two weeks in India during your April 2018 visit there.  Any pictures of interest to post?

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Norway Coast/Fjords/Arctic Circle cruise from Copenhagen, July 2010, to the top of Europe. Scenic visuals with key tips. Live/blog at 247,516 views.

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/1172051-livesilver-cloud-norway-coastfjords-july-1-16-reports/

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Just completed reading a book called  "Conquerors" by New York Times bestselling author Roger Crowley.  This author shares important details for the emergence of Portugal around 1500 AD.  This small, poor nation rose up to experience a century of maritime supremacy thanks to the daring and navigational skill of its explorers.  And, the "aggressive", super-warrior ways exhibited to win and dominate in India at key locations such as Goa.    

 

Portugal’s discovery of a sea route to India, its campaign of imperial conquest over Muslim rulers and domination of the spice trade would forever disrupt the Mediterranean and build the first global economy.  "Globalization of Trade"??  Portugal did it most effectively!!  And, disrupted the role and power of Venice, etc.

 

The author details much about King Manuel “the Fortunate” and effective/ruthless Governor Afonso de Albuquerque, plus Vasco da Gama and more.  Much for this story is about Portugal’s ascent and drive to eradicate Islamic culture and establish a Christian empire in the Indian Ocean. The discovery of a route to India around the horn of Africa was not only a brilliant breakthrough in navigation but heralded a complete upset of the world order that brought huge wealth to Portugal. 

 

I completed this book after reading his interesting and highly-detailed Venice book chronicling that City-State's rise and slide downward.  

 

From the New York Times book review in 2016, they had this headline: Conquerors: How Portugal Forged the First Global Empire with these opening highlights:Afonso de Albuquerque died 500 years ago, after spending a dozen years terrorizing coastal cities from Yemen to Malaysia. He enriched thousands of men and killed tens of thousands more. Despite never commanding more than a few dozen ships, he built one of the first modern intercontinental empires. And this was just the beginning: The next step, he said, was to sail up the Red Sea, destroy Mecca, Medina and the Prophet Muhammad’s body and liberate the Holy Land. The 18 years between December 1497, when Vasco da Gama rounded the Cape of Good Hope, and December 1515, when Albuquerque died off the Indian coast, were a pivotal point in history.

 

Religion and political power?  Money and trade?  Is anything really new or different?  In preparing to visit India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Singapore, etc., for the first time in early 2024, all of this Portugal history links together well.  We think of the British as the major world power, especially in India, but we forget about the earlier, key role played by Portugal, the Dutch, etc.  

 

From this review, it summarizes some other key points to understand and appreciate: "Ships and guns gave Europeans command of the seas, but even when Indians bought or copied European weapons and hired European advisers — as they did by 1510 — they still could not compete with what Crowley calls the Portuguese 'berserker fighting style.' From the humblest foot soldier up to Albuquerque himself, the Europeans were simply ferocious, throwing themselves at their enemies with reckless courage. Sometimes indiscipline brought on disaster, but often Africans, Indians, Arabs and Turks turned and fled."

 

This book provides so much "depth" and details for the history of India, its various stage of development and connection with the rest of the world over many centuries.  

 

Full NY Times book review at:

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/17/books/review/conquerors-how-portugal-forged-the-first-global-empire-by-roger-crowley.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Venice: Loving It & Why??!!  Is one of your future desires or past favorites? See these many visual samples for its great history and architecture.  This posting is now at 104,414 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1278226

 

Here is a view of the cover of this interesting book detailing how Portugal created its global trading empire that fueled its power and wealth in the early 1500's.  So much of the centers around India and its amazing history, culture, etc.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see this visual larger/better!)

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  • 2 weeks later...

As we prepare for our first visit to India and doing the Feb. 2024 Mumbai to Singapore sailing, I have been researching much on India's long, unique, involved history, plus the many aspects of their amazing culture and interesting traditions.    

 

From the BBC in the past week, they had this headline: Theyyam: The Indian trance where men become gods with this sub-headline: "Predating Hinduisim, theyyam is an ancient and mysterious folk ritual, and one of South India's most mesmerising experiences."

 

Here are some of the reporting highlights by Tim Bird: “With nearly 1.5 billion people and 330 million Hindu deities, India has no shortage of religious festivals and performances. Yet one of the most ancient and mesmerising is theyyam, which takes place in the southern state of Kerala and parts of neighbouring Karnataka. Meaning 'God' or the "'ncarnation of God', theyyam is an ancient folk ritual combining theatre, mime and worship that predates Hinduism but incorporates Hindu mythology.  Despite the fact that theyyam harks back to an animistic, pre-Hindu time, a fundamental element of Hinduism underlines the performance: the caste system. ”

 

Here was one of the pictures by the author to illustrate this art form from India: 

image.thumb.png.a1281337b6904d582882fac847c85203.png

 

Full story at:

https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20230628-theyyam-the-indian-trance-where-men-become-gods

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Amazon River-Caribbean 2015 adventure live/blog starting in Barbados. Many visuals from this amazing river and Caribbean Islands (Dutch ABC's, St. Barts, Dominica, Grenada, San Juan, etc.).  Now at 71,988 views:

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2076101-live-amazon-river-caribbean-many-pix’s-terryohio/

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Terry, 

 

If you haven't encountered it yet, I strongly recommend William Dalrymple's books on India before traveling. City Of Jinns is a good starting point and is focused on Delhi but any of them would be excellent background. Or, if you prefer, the podcast he does with Anita Anand (called Empire) is also wonderful as a background for a trip to India.

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On 7/4/2023 at 9:50 AM, SimplyMarvie said:

Terry, If you haven't encountered it yet, I strongly recommend William Dalrymple's books on India before traveling. City Of Jinns is a good starting point and is focused on Delhi but any of them would be excellent background. Or, if you prefer, the podcast he does with Anita Anand (called Empire) is also wonderful as a background for a trip to India.

 

Appreciate this above very good suggestion and follow-up.  Will check at our library for that author and this book.  

 

Am right now fishing reading the 480-page, highly-detailed "Freedom at Midnight" book.  It covers the period leading up to, around and after Aug. 15, 1947, when the UK handed India back to the native populations.  But, it became two countries, Pakistan and India.  And, as the say, the rest is history!!   

image.thumb.jpeg.caff7829808ae8cfa715ea6c79db6e9c.jpeg

 

This book was strongly suggested by a good friend whose father was William B. Saxbe, the U.S. Ambassador to India in the 1970's.  His tip was a great one!!  Fascinating reading as this 1975, non-fiction book centers around all of the events leading up to the Indian independence movement and partition.  Much is covered for the last year of the British Raj when Lord Mountbatten was the last Viceroy of British India.  It goes up through the death and funeral of Mahatma Gandhi.

 

The author's style really "takes you there" to understand so very well the long and tangled history of this highly-populated sub-continent with its battles between Hindus and Muslims, plus the Sikh religions and interests, etc., etc.  The parts about the colorful and extravagant lifestyles of the various Indian princes brings out another key part of their history and traditions that might be forgotten or missed.  Much is about the reasons and fatal results from the partition of British India into India and Pakistan based on the centuries of religious differences and mistrusts.  Then, there was the terrible bloodshed that followed.  Also pictured on the cover above are Jawaharlal Nehru and Muhammad Ali Jinnah, two of the key leaders during those challenged times.  

 

Much background is also included going to back 1599 when the first Queen Elizabeth authorized the initial exploring by the British to India as a way to get around high Dutch prices for spices.  This book was an inspirations for the 2017 film Viceroy's House, starring  Hugh Bonneville and Gillian Anderson.  Many details are also outlined for how the British played off the various sides to keep control of this highly-diverse area with its many factions and deep religious divisions.  And the wealth and riches??  Yes, the history for India is complex and fascinating.  This helps better understand the vastness of the British colonial empire at its peak and the "twists and turns" involved over those centuries.    Highly recommended reading for this book and other sources to better appreciate so much as to the "why" and "how" for India today and in the past.  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Athens & Greece: Visuals, details from two visits in a city and nearby with great history, culture and architecture.  Now at 54,940 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1101008

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One of our key objectives before boarding our cruise in Mumbai to Sri Lanka and ultimately ending in Singapore is to be able to explore the famed India Golden Triangle.  

 

From Conde Nast Travel+Leisure magazine last year, they had this headline: India's Iconic 'Pink City' Is Continuously Voted One of the Best in the World" with this sub-headline:  "Jaipur, the capital of India's Rajasthan state, is a destination filled with beautiful palaces, a rich history, and luxury hotels.

 

Here are some of their reporting highlights:Jaipur forms a key point on the Golden Triangle, the tourist circuit that connects New Delhi, Agra, and Rajasthan. Jaipur's nickname is a nod to the pink buildings within its historic core, among them the iconic Hawa Mahal.  Jaipur is also continuously named one of the best cities in the world by Travel + Leisure readers. A city of sprawling palaces, it's also home to ornate architectural masterpieces and sweeping views of lush green hills and idyllic lakes. It is the first planned city in India and has earned UNESCO World Heritage status. And its streets feel a little more manageable than the congested labyrinths of New Delhi and Mumbai.This is a city that inspired Paul McCartney to write 'Riding into Jaipur' and became the backdrop of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel movies. It is a place to to feast on sumptuous meals in the banquet halls of royalty, and to reminisce about a bygone era of Maharajas. Ride elephants and explore Mughal architecture by day and enjoy some of the world's finest hotels by night.

 

Great background and details with this in-depth profile.  Any tips to share from those who have been to Jaipur?

 

Full story at:

https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-guide/jaipur-india

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

AFRICA?!!?: Fun, interesting visuals, plus travel details from this early 2016 live/blog. At 54,426 views. Featuring Cape Town, South Africa’s coast, Mozambique, Victoria Falls/Zambia and Botswana's famed Okavango Delta.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2310337

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In Jaipur when you get to the Palace of the winds you get a lovely view from the rooftops across the street.

We went upstairs in a jewellery shop. The owner invited us in, we went through the shop and up onto the roof. Got lovely photos. I also got a lovely silver bracelet from the shop. No hard sell, just Indian people helping tourists get more of their experience and we were happy to make a purchase. I still wear the bracelet.

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TLCOhio (Casey),

 

I have been busy but would like to forward to you what our itinerary was for India.  My email is ssawjo at cox dot net.  Just email me with your email and I will get it to you asap.

 

BTW, it is NOT recommended to ride the elephants in Jaipur.  It is alleged that they are badly mistreated by their handlers (they are called something else but no matter).  When I was there, they did not look very happy.  

 

Bill

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On 7/6/2023 at 4:45 PM, ssawjo said:

TLCOhio (Casey), I have been busy but would like to forward to you what our itinerary was for India.  My em ail is ssawjo at cox dot net.  Just email me with your email and I will get it to you asap.   BTW, it is NOT recommended to ride the elephants in Jaipur.  It is alleged that they are badly mistreated by their handlers (they are called something else but no matter).  When I was there, they did not look very happy.  Bill

 

Hi, Bill!!  Did send earlier and then resent yesterday an email follow-up.  Maybe it went into your spam folder??  Might re-check if it went there by mistake.  Since the first part of my email is TLCOhio, that could have happened.  Look forward to seeing the details for your itinerary and connecting to learn more.  

 

Last night we had dinner with some long-time friends who are super active world travelers.  Back in the days before she went to law school, became a Judge, etc., she had been a stewardess with TWA and explored many unique parts of the world.  From their "wild" experiences in India a number of years back, they offered . . . Yes, it can be "chaos", but just relax, observe and enjoy that variety and unpredictable nature of what is there with the people, places, history, etc.  Lots of colorful variety that is different than our normal, daily expectations in the USA.  But, that is the beauty of India!  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Lisbon, NWSpain, Bordeaux/Brittany: Live/blog, June 2017 from Portugal to France along scenic Atlantic Coast on the Silver Spirit.  Now at 33,569 views.  Many pictures, details for history, food, culture, etc.:

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On 7/6/2023 at 4:04 PM, Kristal Blade said:

In Jaipur when you get to the Palace of the Winds you get a lovely view from the rooftops across the street.  We went upstairs in a jewellery shop. The owner invited us in, we went through the shop and up onto the roof. Got lovely photos. I also got a lovely silver bracelet from the shop. No hard sell, just Indian people helping tourists get more of their experience and we were happy to make a purchase. I still wear the bracelet.

 

Appreciate this great suggestion and follow-up from Kristal Blade.  Wonderful tip and insight.  Have copied and saved in my file on the MacBook Pro laptop for our time in colorful Jaipur.  Excellent background, especially in still wearing that bracelet.  Wonderful way to keep those very good memories alive and well.  Keep it coming with any and all such creative, nice ideas!!

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Panama Canal? Early 2017, Fort Lauderdale to San Francisco adventure through Panama Canal.  Our first stops in Colombia, Central America and Mexico, plus added time in the great Golden Gate City. Now at 32,113 views.

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56 minutes ago, TLCOhio said:

 

Hi, Bill!!  Did send earlier and then resent yesterday an email follow-up.  Maybe it went into your spam folder??  Might re-check if it went there by mistake.  Since the first part of my email is TLCOhio, that could have happened.  Look forward to seeing the details for your itinerary and connecting to learn more.  

 

 

Casey, try again.  It is ssawjo at cox dot net.  It should work. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/8/2023 at 11:33 AM, ssawjo said:

Casey, try again.  It is ssawjo at cox dot net.  It should work. 

 

Have tried a couple more times.  Maybe going into your junk or spam folder.  Might check there or do a search for TLCOhio on your overall email file.  

 

Just completed watching the one hour and 46 minute film "Viceroy's House" as illustrated well.  Parts of it follows, in much shorter format, part of the "Freedom at Midnight" book.  It also has and added some "love drama" between a couple of the Indian staff members who worked for Lord Mountbatten.  The settings and castings are very well done and gives a decent "overview' for the challenges and history that happened during this time period.   Movies cannot give the full depth for that period in time, but it was well worth getting and watching.  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

 

For "Viceroy's House", this cover art gives a nice visual sampling.  Two of the lead actors are well-known for their other important roles in The Crown and Downton Abbey, etc.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see this visual larger/better!)

image.thumb.png.0336a9e76fdb44213d59aae8ba65de97.png

 

 

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1 minute ago, TLCOhio said:

 

Have tried a couple more times.  Maybe going into your junk or spam folder.  Might check there or do a search for TLCOhio on your overall email file.  

 

Just completed watching the one hour and 46 minute film "Viceroy's House" as illustrated well.  Parts of it follows, in much shorter format, part of the "Freedom at Midnight" book.  It also has and added some "love drama" between a couple of the Indian staff members who worked for Lord Mountbatten.  The settings and castings are very well done and gives a decent "overview' for the challenges and history that happened during this time period.   Movies cannot give the full depth for that period in time, but it was well worth getting and watching.  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

 

For "Viceroy's House", this cover art gives a nice visual sampling.  Two of the lead actors are well-known for their other important roles in The Crown and Downton Abbey, etc.:

(Open your screen/viewer wider to see this visual larger/better!)

image.thumb.png.0336a9e76fdb44213d59aae8ba65de97.png

 

 

Not sure what to say! I checked spam and everything.  ssawjo@cox.net  That should work.  Try one more time.  Sorry about that.  Bill

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24 minutes ago, ssawjo said:

Not sure what to say! I checked spam and everything.  ssawjo@cox.net  That should work.  Try one more time.  Sorry about that.  Bill

 

Have re-sent to your Arizona friend.  Hopefully, one of these will go through.  

 

From the New York Times this morning, they had this headline: How a Vast Demographic Shift Will Reshape the World with these highlights:The world’s demographics have already been transformed. Europe is shrinking. China is shrinking, with India, a much younger country, overtaking it this year as the world’s most populous nation.  But what we’ve seen so far is just the beginning.   The projections are reliable, and stark: By 2050, people age 65 and older will make up nearly 40 percent of the population in some parts of East Asia and Europe. That’s almost twice the share of older adults in Florida, America’s retirement capital. Extraordinary numbers of retirees will be dependent on a shrinking number of working-age people to support them.

 

Interesting projections and details.  Especially for India as it grows so much with a younger, hopefully more agile, creative population.  Also shared in the profile is that these trends might impact the cruise industry's future cruise potential audiences: "In all of recorded history, no country has ever been as old as these nations are expected to get.  As a result, experts predict, things many wealthier countries take for granted — like pensions, retirement ages and strict immigration policies — will need overhauls to be sustainable."

 

Here is one chart shown by the NYT as a future year, who is aging most, what countries are younger and in the middle:

image.thumb.png.1dcef8a67d05cd38bc52934f773177fe.png

 

Full story at:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/07/16/world/world-demographics.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Summer 2019 Calgary, Jasper/Banff National Parks, Western Canada Rocky Mountaineer rail adventure, Vancouver, sailing up to Alaska on Silver Muse, post-cruise excursion to Denali, etc.  Many visuals, Our firsts in these scenic areas!  Now at 19,512 views. Live/blog: 

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2682584-live-terryohio-silver-muse-alaska-canadarockies-pix’s/

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From a luxury travel news website last month, they had this headline: Luxury guide to gorgeous Goa, India’s smallest and richest state with these highlights:Goa is India’s smallest and wealthiest state attracting more than two million tourists annually, who are drawn to its beaches with swaying palm trees, the sedate pace of life and World Heritage architecture. Ruled by the Portuguese for nearly 500 years, Goa offers visitors a fascinating insight into a rich and vibrant culture and a colourful history.  To discover Goa’s historical Portuguese influence I visited the Basilica of Bom Jesus, a UNESCO World Heritage site and an outstanding example of baroque architecture. Located in Old Goa, the basilica is the final resting place of St. Francis Xavier, a Basque Roman Catholic missionary who co founded the Society of Jesus.  The Basilica, consecrated in 1605, is recognised as a landmark of Christianity.

 

For our February 2024 Mumbai to Singapore sailing, we will have a stop for Goa.  Many, including me, forget about this long, long history with Portugal and India.  Plus, the Christian influences and connections for this part of India.  

 

Also noted in this profile: "The Sé Cathedral, the largest church in India, is also located in Old Goa. The cathedral, completed in 1619, was built to celebrate the victory of the Portuguese over a Muslim army, which resulted in the capture of Goa."  Other attractions, including those nature- and beach-related, are outlined in this detailed profile.  

 

They also listed to learn more about Goa’s attractions, the option to visit goa-tourism.com

 

Full story at:

https://www.luxurylifestylemag.co.uk/travel/a-luxury-guide-to-gorgeous-goa-indias-smallest-and-richest-state/

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Early 2020, many visuals and details from New Zealand/South Pacific in going from Auckland to French Polynesia.  This includes Bora Bora, Fiji, NZ experiences, etc:  Live/blog:

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2735732-live-terryohio-“new”-regatta-south-pacificnz-pix’s/

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On 6/15/2023 at 3:30 PM, TLCOhio said:

 

Thrilled to hear you'll be making your first-ever trip to India! You are in for an amazing adventure and I know everyone will be looking forward to reading your report and, of course, seeing incredible photos when you're back. 

 

Always appreciate the supporting media, this time to a CNN piece by:

Tara Subramaniam

 

Have fun planning, always a fun way to kickstart every adventure. Keep us posted. 🙂

 

 

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18 hours ago, Host Bonjour said:

Thrilled to hear you'll be making your first-ever trip to India! You are in for an amazing adventure and I know everyone will be looking forward to reading your report and, of course, seeing incredible photos when you're back. Have fun planning, always a fun way to kickstart every adventure. Keep us posted. 🙂

 

Appreciate these great comments and follow-up from Host Bonjour.  YES, it is fun and interesting to do all of this research and planning in preparing for such an "adventure".  The history, architecture, culture, food, etc., from this region are so totally different and completely amazing.  Lots of consider!!  Like in the United States, one trip cannot cover it "ALL".    

 

We wanted to be sure that we were able to do the "Golden Triangle", including Agra and the famed Taj Mahal.  But in what Silversea originally offered, it did not include a pre-cruise option for Jaipur.  We have been able to arrange a private tour option that makes the "logistics" easier and including colorful Jaipur.  Below is a little added background for this "star" for this nation.  

 

From the Times of India by Precious Rongmei, they had this headline: Reasons Why It's Impossible Not to Love Jaipur with these highlights:The city of Jaipur is a vibrant and culturally rich tourist destination that attracts visitors from all over the world. It is one of the major tourist destinations in India. The city, also popularly known as the Pink City due to the distinctive colour of the pink sandstone monuments and buildings, is not only visually pleasant, it also offers a unique blend of ancient heritage. Jaipur has beautifully incorporated architecture, colourful bazaars, and the royal Rajasthani culture into one stunning travel experience for all visitors.

 

One of my key personal interests is for their "Grand Architecture", including this background cited in this profile:  "Jaipur's pink sandstone structures have earned the city the nickname Pink City. These beautiful and iconic structures showcase a harmonious blend of Rajput and Mughal styles. Monuments like the iconic Hawa Mahal, City Palace, and Amer Fort, with their impressive architecture, are every photographer's delight." 

 

YES, excellent photo opportunities are a key objective for me on this trip.

 

Full story at:

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/travel/destinations/reasons-why-it-is-impossible-to-not-love-jaipur/photostory/101927621.cms

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Late Summer 2022, many scenic visuals and details from Canada Maritimes doing Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton Island, etc., via a Tauck land tour.  Visual Summary:

www.flickr.com/photos/196555480@N08/albums

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From the London/UK Times, they had this headline: India travel guide" with this sub-head:  "What to do, where to stay and why you’ll love it.

 

Here are a few of their key highlights by Prachi Joshi: “Travelling in India can overwhelm your senses with myriad sights, smells and sounds. One moment you might be gazing at the snowclad Himalayas in Ladakh and the next sipping beer and eating fried fish at a beach shack in Goa. Then there’s the contrasting architecture: swanky malls in Bengaluru and ancient archaeological wonders.  What you will remember the most are the people; the warm smiles and hospitality of more than 1.3 billion souls, a largely young population embracing modernity while firmly holding on to traditions and culture.”

 

This summary/suggestions fit perfectly for our starting schedule/plan for February 2024: "One of the first travelling tips for India is 'do not attempt it all'. With an area equivalent to most of western Europe, a single trip will barely scratch the surface. Spend a few days in the capital city of New Delhi ticking off the big-name sights: Mughal-era Red Fort, Jama Masjid, Qutub Minar, and Humayun’s Tomb. Immerse yourself in the frenetic markets of Chandni Chowk before finding a moment of peace at the landscaped Lodhi Gardens. Then there’s Agra for the Taj Mahal — best visited in the early morning or towards sunset to avoid the tourist hordes."

 

Full story at:

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/travel/destinations/asia/india/

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Barcelona/Med: June 2011, with stops in Villefranche, ports near Pisa and Rome, Naples, Kotor, Venice and Dubrovnik. Great visuals with key highlights, tips, etc. Live/blog now at 256,748 views.

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/1362155-solstice-livefirst-timer-reportspix’s-italycroatian-june-7-19/

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  • 5 weeks later...

From the London/UK Independent and MSN News this morning, they had this headline: India’s capital to be brought to standstill for three-day G20 summit with these highlights: “India’s national capital New Delhi will come to a standstill for three days in September as it will play host to several world leaders for the G20 summit.  Travel and access to Delhi, known for having a high population density, is expected to be severely restricted ahead of the event as world leaders like Joe Biden, Xi Jinping, Emmanuel Macron and Justin Trudeau will reach the city to attend the multilateral event.

 

Here is more from this reporting: "No buses will be allowed to move on the city roads between the midnights of September 7 and September 10, people are advised to use the Metro for commuting to their destination.  Police officials have also directed the Delhi Metro to shut services at some stations."

 

Sounds like things will be crazy in the Sept. 7-10 period for in and around Delhi.  Glad our trip there is not until early February 2024.  

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/india-s-capital-to-be-brought-to-standstill-for-three-day-g20-summit/ar-AA1fSLTz

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Canada 2022/2023: Scenic visuals, details from Canada Maritimes (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton Island).  Plus, new from Aug. 2023, exploring historic/charming Quebec City.    Visual/Info Summaries:

www.flickr.com/photos/196555480@N08/albums

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From CNN, the cable news network, earlier this year, they had this headline: Hawa Mahal: How India’s stunning ‘palace of winds’ was ahead of its time with these highlights by Shalbha Sarda:Jaipur is famed for its historic pink buildings.  It was the first 'planned city' of King Sawai Jai Singh, an astronomer who used planetary positions as his guide when deciding on the orientation and positions of the structures. He moved his kingdom’s capital from the nearby village of Amer to Jaipur in 1727.

 

Descendant King Sawai Pratap Singh showcased his passion with Hawa Mahal, architecturally significant and offering lessons in sustainable building.  It was completed in 1799 and is one of India’s most recognizable icons and a popular tourist attraction with approximately one million visits each year.

 

Here is more from this CNN report: "With a staggering height of 87 feet, dotted with 953 ornate louvered windows, it’s a feast for the eyes. But few realize that what you see from the street is essentially the rear of the building.  The King was an ardent devotee of Hindu deity Krishna and commissioned architect Lal Chand Usta to construct a crown-shaped pavilion that resembled Krishna’s crown. Hawa Mahal was the result."

 

While City Palace and Amber Fort are consider the top two attractions as "must-sees" in Jaipur, Hawa Mahal is another key option.  Lots to consider for what can be seen as the top priorities in these various locations in the Golden Triangle.  Any experiences and suggestions for Jaipur?

 

Full story at:

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/india-hawa-mahal-palace-of-the-winds/index.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Norway Coast/Fjords/Arctic Circle cruise from Copenhagen, July 2010, to the top of Europe. Scenic visuals with key tips. Live/blog at 248,537 views.

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/1172051-livesilver-cloud-norway-coastfjords-july-1-16-reports/

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Congratulations to India with this space accomplishment.  Impressive!!

 

From MSN and Sky News today, they had this headline: India's moon lander shows off with another touchdown" in a story by Tom Acres with this sub-headline: "Not content with making history by reaching the lunar surface's south pole, India's moon lander has shown off by hopping to a second soft landing.

 

Here are some of their reporting highlights: “While the rover, named Pragyan, continued to roam the surface, India's space agency revealed on Monday morning Vikram had successfully performed a second soft landing via a 'hop experiment'.  It only reached an altitude of 40cm, and moved between 30cm and 40cm, but the test was said to be a good sign for future missions that could take humans to the moon and back.  The mission, named Chandrayaan-3, came after a previous failed attempt by India in 2019 and one by Moscow's Roscosmos space agency just last month.  India has since also launched its first mission to study the sun.

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/hop-to-it-indias-moon-lander-shows-off-with-another-touchdown/ar-AA1gdw10

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Sydney to NZ/Auckland Adventure, live/blog 2014 sampling/details with many exciting visuals and key highlights.  On page 23, post #571, see a complete index for all of the pictures, postings.  Now at 245,156 views.

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/1896175-solstice-live-australianzhawaii-many-pix’s-jan-20-feb-3/

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